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Is it possible to make splines with no end grain showing?

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Forum topic by TiggerWood posted 46 days ago 505 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TiggerWood

197 posts in 239 days


46 days ago

The only possible way I can think of is to find a sharp bend in the wood and make the splines out of that. Is there any other way or does the end grain on the spline not matter/bother you?


9 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7426 posts in 2280 days


#1 posted 46 days ago

You could make triangle spline stock and then glue thick
veneer mitered on the corner on it. Then cut off your
splines. The thick “veneer” will give you some long grain
to plane away.

End grain on splines does not bother me.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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Yonak

249 posts in 153 days


#2 posted 46 days ago

I’m making a chest top right now which splines are shorter that the length of the adjoined pieces. I just started short and ended the dado cut short on the table saw. Is that applicable to your question ?

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TiggerWood

197 posts in 239 days


#3 posted 46 days ago

Loren, That sounds good and challenging.

Yonak, I’m sorry, I have no idea what you are describing.

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Yonak

249 posts in 153 days


#4 posted 45 days ago


Yonak, I m sorry, I have no idea what you are describing.

- TiggerWood

Clearly, you and I are not singing from the same songbook. Good luck.

View TheDane's profile (online now)

TheDane

3740 posts in 2295 days


#5 posted 45 days ago


Yonak, I m sorry, I have no idea what you are describing.

He is talking about a stopped dado (or groove). The dado/groove stops just short of both ends of the pieces being joined. The spline would then be more like a loose tenon … you would get the advantage of the strength and alignment a spline affords without seeing the end-grain of the spline itself.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Loren's profile

Loren

7426 posts in 2280 days


#6 posted 45 days ago

There are all kinds of concealed joints most woodworkers
have never learned to cut. Hidden dovetails and things
like that. You can cut a miter with a sort of half-lap in
the back, but cut back so the excavated portion on the
one side is not visible from the edge of the frame. You
can even do a miter with a concealed mortise and tenon
joint but it could be tricky to cut well and especially tricky
on thin frame stock.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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patron

13017 posts in 1973 days


#7 posted 45 days ago

mitered corners
and the spline going down the miter
with the grain going across the joint
(so the spline doesn’t split)

plane stock to saw kerf thickness
and crosscut pieces to length

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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TiggerWood

197 posts in 239 days


#8 posted 45 days ago

Thank you guys. I understand what your saying about the hidden joints.

I like the spline contrast and have seen many splines on picture frames, with the long grain showing on the side, possibly with the end grain on top and bottom. It really looks good and I would probably take the approach with picture frames. I want to make a wine box using splines. On a box, people will see both sides of the spline.

Right now I’m thinking of making the spline with the grain on one side and then inlaying veneer on the other. How does this sound to you?

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1494 posts in 353 days


#9 posted 45 days ago

I think you’d be loosing much of the strength involved with having the wood turned in such a manner that the end grain wasn’t visible. If you’re more concerned with the contrast look than gaining strength in the joint, you could make a shallow stop dado on two adjacent sides and inset a small piece of the contrasting wood of choice. It would take very little wood to do so and you could miter the corners together so they matched the miter of the wood they were inset into.

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