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Question about shop lighting, cooling, and a few tools.

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Forum topic by SouthernWoodworking posted 47 days ago 726 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SouthernWoodworking

89 posts in 69 days


47 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question planer lathe jointer

Ok, so Im moving into my new shop. Its a 60×40 metal barn with horse stalls. Right now, Im in the “office” area of it and its 16×11. Im moving my tools over and in a little while, will have to knock down a wall to expand for more room. Since this Georgia heat can easily reach 98+ and get about 110 in the barn, how can I cool down this oven? I got two 20in fans that move some air but Im not sure if it needs more. I thought about adding insulation and using the window A/C that was in their about 9 years ago but its covered in dust. Not sure if it works.

As for lighting, their are two regular bulbs in their now but it need more. I went to lowes and looked around at some solutions but they are expensive. I do have some electrical background. Did several car audio installs and used to build robots so I know a little. What do yall use? I thought about running some LED strips across the roof. Its cheaper and more efficient power wise I believe. Dont know about the light output. Their is only one set of outlets in the room so Im getting a electrician out there to add 4 more. None of my tools use 220 so all will be 110.

Lastly, my birthday is about 10 days away and Im thinking about getting another tool. I have a tablesaw, circular saw, Jig Saw, scroll saw, random orbit sander, belt sander, miter saw, and drill press. I was thinking about a planer. Don W is sending me a hand plane for free ( thank you so much by the way!) but, a planer is faster. Though a hand plane is still very useful to have. I was going to do a jointer but I can make a jig for that. I also thought about a lathe. Turning seem really fun to me.

So will all that, what do yall think?

-- Noah Lambert, Georgia, 2x2 Designs.


22 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

3415 posts in 2593 days


#1 posted 47 days ago

You need to concentrate on the HVAC side of the shop rather than tooling. No matter what tools ya have, if the shop/barn is too hot, ya can’t get anything done.
I’d go for air movement at this stage.
Certainly insulation is needed as well as ventilation.
Whatcha gonna do in the winter?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View SouthernWoodworking's profile

SouthernWoodworking

89 posts in 69 days


#2 posted 47 days ago



You need to concentrate on the HVAC side of the shop rather than tooling. No matter what tools ya have, if the shop/barn is too hot, ya can t get anything done.
I d go for air movement at this stage.
Certainly insulation is needed as well as ventilation.
Whatcha gonna do in the winter?
Bill

- Bill White


I love cold weather. It can be 20 outside and ill be fine. HVAC may be too expensive.

-- Noah Lambert, Georgia, 2x2 Designs.

View crank49's profile

crank49

3378 posts in 1603 days


#3 posted 47 days ago

Are you talking about making a shop out of what was formerly office space? The 16’ x 11’ space out of the 40’ x 60’ total?

What kind of ceiling and how high is it. Have to know that before any recommendation can be made that makes any sense.

One thing I can say for sure is that you don’t just need 4 outlets. You need, at a bare minimum, at least a couple of outlet circuits. Three or four circuits would be better. And also, don’t have your lights on a shared circuit with your outlets.

I didn’t see any mention of a workbench. A good solid heavy workbench is really needed to be able to use and take advantage of that hand plane. Hand tools in general were not mentioned much in your list. I don’t know if you don’t have them yet, or just didn’t mention them, but everything productive does not have to have a tail (power cord). At a minimum I would not want to tackle any project without accurate measuring tools, some good squares, a bevel gauge, levels, a divider, and a compass. Then I would also want to have at least a block plane, a jack and a smoother in the hand plane department and at least a couple of good chisels. Finally, a good hand saw or two is needed even if you have powered saws. I use these tools on just about everything I do.

I will agree that it is more important to have a planer than a jointer after you have the above items. You can joint with hand planes and a good table saw if you have to.

Personally I’d rather have a good router before a jointer as well.

A lathe, on the other hand, is a totally different tool for a different type of wood working.

I’m building a 16’ x 24’ shop with a 8’ x 12’ attic room and I’ll need a 12,000 BTU air conditioner. Bought a new one for $300. Have seen some on Craig’s List of similar size for $100 to $200. I chose to go new because I wanted energy efficiency and a warranty. 12,000 BTU is about as big as you can get with a 120volt unit.

You said you have a couple of regular lights in there. Do you mean regular incandescent light bulbs?
If so, you can get 68 watt compact fluorescent bulbs that will fit in a standard light socket. They are about the size of a football and put out the equivalent of 300 watts of light. They cost about $17 each. Cheapest way I know to get a lot of light in an existing layout.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View SouthernWoodworking's profile

SouthernWoodworking

89 posts in 69 days


#4 posted 47 days ago



Are you talking about making a shop out of what was formerly office space? The 16 x 11 space out of the 40 x 60 total?

What kind of ceiling and how high is it. Have to know that before any recommendation can be made that makes any sense.

One thing I can say for sure is that you don t just need 4 outlets. You need, at a bare minimum, at least a couple of outlet circuits. Three or four circuits would be better. And also, don t have your lights on a shared circuit with your outlets.

I didn t see any mention of a workbench. A good solid heavy workbench is really needed to be able to use and take advantage of that hand plane. Hand tools in general were not mentioned much in your list. I don t know if you don t have them yet, or just didn t mention them, but everything productive does not have to have a tail (power cord). At a minimum I would not want to tackle any project without accurate measuring tools, some good squares, a bevel gauge, levels, a divider, and a compass. Then I would also want to have at least a block plane, a jack and a smoother in the hand plane department and at least a couple of good chisels. Finally, a good hand saw or two is needed even if you have powered saws. I use these tools on just about everything I do.

I will agree that it is more important to have a planer than a jointer after you have the above items. You can joint with hand planes and a good table saw if you have to.

Personally I d rather have a good router before a jointer as well.

A lathe, on the other hand, is a totally different tool for a different type of wood working.

I m building a 16 x 24 shop with a 8 x 12 attic room and I ll need a 12,000 BTU air conditioner. Bought a new one for $300. Have seen some on Craig s List of similar size for $100 to $200. I chose to go new because I wanted energy efficiency and a warranty. 12,000 BTU is about as big as you can get with a 120volt unit.

You said you have a couple of regular lights in there. Do you mean regular incandescent light bulbs?
If so, you can get 68 watt compact fluorescent bulbs that will fit in a standard light socket. They are about the size of a football and put out the equivalent of 300 watts of light. They cost about $17 each. Cheapest way I know to get a lot of light in an existing layout.

- crank49


I have two workbenches and gonna build a third to allow for bench dogs. I have level, squares, and all that. Got a nice router too. Got handsaws but need a good coping saw. I dont however have chisels and gonna buy some here soon.

when I say 4 outlets, I mean Im adding 4 ‘things’ ( dont know the word) with 2 outlets in each. So ill have 10 outlets in total. I know the outlets and lights are a separate circuit.

The roof is about 10 ft high I think. Give or take a foot. Its got a plywood roof with some 2×6’s for support and places to hang stuff. The space is already their. Im not having to build anything.

-- Noah Lambert, Georgia, 2x2 Designs.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1657 posts in 1554 days


#5 posted 46 days ago

I suggest that wherever you plan to put those duplex outlets you put in a fourplex instead. I have a small 13’ x22’ insulated shop here in west Texas and run two window units to keep it cool. It is often over 100° here.

-- In God We Trust

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2797 posts in 1876 days


#6 posted 46 days ago

An air conditioner won’t help much if you don’t have insulation. You are better off with a good air flow with a big fan.

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

238 posts in 490 days


#7 posted 46 days ago

Use a exhaust fan mounted in the gable of the roof across for the largest door. Open the door turn on the fan and that will get a nice breeze flowing through the shop. This is commonly used in large fabrication and production shops. Although it still sucks when it’s hot out that fresh air breeze will make you happy not to mention it will change the air out in your shop and keep the air from heating up as bad. You can give a call to your local union sheet metal school or shop and they can help you out with figuring out the size of the fan with the amount of heat, humidity and air changes needed for your area along with or with out insulation. Remember insulation works both ways it can keep heat in or out. Don’t listen to the bigger is better when it comes to hvac work that is a very bad thing to do or recommend. Any thing to do with moving air around is hvac work and calling a union shop will help you with the amount of book knowledge and experience they have in the field.

View NormG's profile

NormG

4112 posts in 1636 days


#8 posted 46 days ago

You did not say what kind of woodworking are you contemplating and/or do now. Think about this first and this may dictate what tool to purchase. Also, I would go with the heating/cooling first, rust is not a good friend

-- Norman

View HerbC's profile (online now)

HerbC

1162 posts in 1492 days


#9 posted 46 days ago

Set up a sprinkler on the ridge of the roof. Water cooling will drop the temps signifivcantly during the day if you have metal roof without insulation.

This is only good if your water is cheap.

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2364 posts in 1594 days


#10 posted 46 days ago

Insulation would be my first recommendation. I used to live in the Atlanta area and it was hot there. Can’t have too much, IMHO. Window units might be too small. IMHO, exhaust fans would only bring in hot air from outside. Consider how humidity would affect your wood stored in the barn. Consider the time and energy it would take to cool down from 98 to say, 75. Lighting- I would opt for fluorescent lights- two or four bulb units. The number would depend on how you are setting up shop. 40X60? I would sell the horses and use the whole thing or at least half of it.
I’m stuck with a 16X18 shop that used to be a garage. Fortunately, it has CH&A.

View SouthernWoodworking's profile

SouthernWoodworking

89 posts in 69 days


#11 posted 46 days ago



Insulation would be my first recommendation. I used to live in the Atlanta area and it was hot there. Can t have too much, IMHO. Window units might be too small. IMHO, exhaust fans would only bring in hot air from outside. Consider how humidity would affect your wood stored in the barn. Consider the time and energy it would take to cool down from 98 to say, 75. Lighting- I would opt for fluorescent lights- two or four bulb units. The number would depend on how you are setting up shop. 40X60? I would sell the horses and use the whole thing or at least half of it.
I m stuck with a 16X18 shop that used to be a garage. Fortunately, it has CH&A.

- Knothead62


The horses have been gone for about 9 years. Only thing thats left is petrified horse poop. I have two 20in fans that I hooked up for the first time today. Cooled it off a ton and the heat index was over a 100 today. I changed the bulbs out with new ones and that made a big difference. Still may need a little though. May put bigger bulbs in.

FYI to all. The whole barn is 60×40, My shop is only 16×11. I think I wasnt clear enough the first post and some people got confused.

-- Noah Lambert, Georgia, 2x2 Designs.

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

238 posts in 490 days


#12 posted 46 days ago

Knot the exhaust fan is replacing the hotter air that would be in the building and creating a breeze that will help wick away the sweat off of your body thus cooling you down. It’s not as nice as a full hvac set up but would be a cheap alternative to a full hvac set up while saving up money for a full set up. Also try to plan your layout of your shop in advance. Like leaving a space empty for a full hvac set up and duct work and if I had mine to do over I would do individual breakers for different areas (lighting breakers, power outlets maybe even different breakers for different power outlets). I used to hate how the electrical company ran wiring. Jumping from one room to another on the same breaker to save on not running 40ft of extra wire instead of a individual circuit for each space. Which oddly was about what was left on a roll after we was done. Just plan ahead and I keep installing more lighting and moving what I have around I don’t think you can ever perfect the lighting.

View SouthernWoodworking's profile

SouthernWoodworking

89 posts in 69 days


#13 posted 46 days ago



Set up a sprinkler on the ridge of the roof. Water cooling will drop the temps signifivcantly during the day if you have metal roof without insulation.

This is only good if your water is cheap.

- HerbC


Well, I do have a pond beside me. Might could hook a water pump up to it and run a line to the roof….

-- Noah Lambert, Georgia, 2x2 Designs.

View HerbC's profile (online now)

HerbC

1162 posts in 1492 days


#14 posted 46 days ago


Set up a sprinkler on the ridge of the roof. Water cooling will drop the temps signifivcantly during the day if you have metal roof without insulation.

This is only good if your water is cheap.

- HerbC

Well, I do have a pond beside me. Might could hook a water pump up to it and run a line to the roof….

- SouthernWoodworking

I used this method to cool a 12×24 garage building we used for a shop in St. Mary’s, GA back in the late 70’s. It kept the shop workable in July and August. When you turned on the sprinkler on a sunny day, the water would actually hiss when it hit the tin. The water would be quite warm (read as HOT) initially and then would even out at perhaps 90 degrees…

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

238 posts in 490 days


#15 posted 45 days ago

Since it’s a 16×14 a mobile ac unit may work for you will need one thats 11000 btu by my calculation. I was treating the space as in the sun with more than one person going in and out and since it has no insulation and will have machinery going as a kitchen space. You can get a ac unit for around 350 but I think in you case it would be good to get a ac and heater in one with a dehumidifier they are around 600. Those calculations will work for a inclosed space. Those prices are a lot cheaper then a full hvac install and all it would take is you ordering it and moving it around where you want it. At 11000 btu if you do add insulation you will be able to not run it as long but I wouldn’t go bigger than that. We have one where I work for overlay welding inside tanks with multiple people.

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