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Resawing on a small bandsaw

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Forum topic by srzsrz posted 07-10-2014 10:28 PM 625 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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srzsrz

37 posts in 556 days


07-10-2014 10:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw resawing

What is the smallest size bandsaw you’d reasonably recommend for resawing? It seems most resaw blades are at least 3/4” and require at least a 14” bandsaw, but Timber Wolf has a 1/2” resaw blade that fits even the little 9” bandsaws like the Ryobi sold at Home Depot. They claim it’s good for kiln dried domestic softwood up to 8” and hardwood up to 10”.

Does anybody have experience with this? I’m currently looking to buy a bandsaw, and I’d prefer a tabletop model for my tiny shop, but I do want to be able to do some resawing, and if you guys say it just can’t be done reliably, I guess I’ll try to squeeze in a 14” bandsaw that can take 3/4” resaw blades.

I also regularly see the Craftsman 12in ones for sale locally, which come on a stand but aren’t quite as bulky as the 14” ones. Has anyone used a saw like that for resawing?


14 replies so far

View Randy_ATX's profile

Randy_ATX

681 posts in 1131 days


#1 posted 07-11-2014 12:30 AM

First off I would ask what size wood are you looking to resaw?

Also the 9” bandsaw will not cut a resaw height of 8” to 10”.
I’m pretty sure a 14” bandsaw has a max resaw height of 6” with no riser.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

2319 posts in 839 days


#2 posted 07-11-2014 12:35 AM

That Ryobi bandsaw can only cut up to 3 1/2” deep.

That Craftsman is somewhere around a 5” resaw capacity.

The standard 14” bandsaws resaw 6”, or 12” with a riser. Be advised though that they don’t really tension 3/4” blades properly. I would get a 1/2” 3tpi. I have a Grizzly G0555LANV with a 6” riser on it. I can resaw 10-12” hardwoods all day long with the 1/2” blade.

-- End grain is like a belly button. Yes, I know you have one. No, I don't want to see it.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1663 posts in 409 days


#3 posted 07-11-2014 12:41 AM

I have the 9” Ryobi band saw and even trying to resaw a 2×4 with an extremely thin kerf blade is very slow going. If you’re even thinking about anything more substantial, you’ll want at least a 14” band saw with a 1hp if not 1 1/2hp motor just to get started.

View srzsrz's profile

srzsrz

37 posts in 556 days


#4 posted 07-11-2014 12:46 AM

Ah, yes, of course I can’t very well expect to resaw anything that doesn’t actually fit, right.

At the moment, frankly, the only particular project I have in mind is some bifold closet doors for an odd-sized closet. They would be some sort of softwood frames and plywood panels, but bifold closet doors need to be 1” thick for standard hardware and of course softwood comes in 3/4” (called 1”) and 1 1/2” (called 2”) (you Americans are nuts, you knew that?).

After that… who knows. Nothing outrageous, I don’t think. I haven’t seen much of anything wider than about 6” at lumber suppliers around here, not furniture grade anyway, but maybe I haven’t been to the right places.

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srzsrz

37 posts in 556 days


#5 posted 07-11-2014 12:53 AM

Thanks for the comments. What I’m hearing is that 2×4s might be just doable, but painful if you have a lot of them, and anything bigger is going to be a real problem.

I think I’ll go by the principle that if I save money by making something myself, I should allow myself to spend the savings on tools. Given the outrageous cost of custom-sized closet doors and how cheap the materials are that you need to make them, I think I may be able to squeeze in a 14” bandsaw after all ;-)

Financial logic makes perfect sense, right?

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jmartel

2319 posts in 839 days


#6 posted 07-11-2014 01:14 AM

Don’t forget that you don’t have to mount the saw on the provided stand. You can put it on wheels with storage underneath if you have a small shop. That’s on my list of things to make.

-- End grain is like a belly button. Yes, I know you have one. No, I don't want to see it.

View mpounders's profile

mpounders

737 posts in 1584 days


#7 posted 07-11-2014 03:25 AM



Ah, yes, of course I can t very well expect to resaw anything that doesn t actually fit, right.

At the moment, frankly, the only particular project I have in mind is some bifold closet doors for an odd-sized closet. They would be some sort of softwood frames and plywood panels, but bifold closet doors need to be 1” thick for standard hardware and of course softwood comes in 3/4” (called 1”) and 1 1/2” (called 2”) (you Americans are nuts, you knew that?).

After that… who knows. Nothing outrageous, I don t think. I haven t seen much of anything wider than about 6” at lumber suppliers around here, not furniture grade anyway, but maybe I haven t been to the right places.

- srzsrz

You might look at the 5/4 boards used for decking…...they are actually 1” thick and you could just rip them down for your frames.

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com

View Loren's profile

Loren

7734 posts in 2337 days


#8 posted 07-11-2014 05:16 AM

You can resaw with a blade as narrow as 1/4” but I
wouldn’t go above 5 or 6” inches doing that.

A 14” or larger band saw is a very useful tool. Resawing
wider than 6” can be an annoyance anyway. The wider
you go the fussier the setup and the more likely the
resawn wood is to cup significantly.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1700 posts in 1611 days


#9 posted 07-11-2014 10:39 AM

I have good luck re-sawing 8” cedar and maple on my GO555 (with riser) 14” band saw using 5/8” Carbide blades form Grizzly.

-- In God We Trust

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

1430 posts in 1058 days


#10 posted 07-11-2014 12:01 PM

I have a 1984 Delta 14” with a 3TPI 1/2” Timberwolf blade and have good results resawing up to the 6” I can. I would recommend a 14” just because it seems like a lot of people have said that if you go smaller, you’ll want to upgrade soon. Don’t know if that’s true as I started with this saw.

I wouldn’t recommend using resawn 2x stock for your door frames. If you’re buying it from the bog box store, that stuff is prone to warping/cupping/splitting at the pith/etc as it is, and when you resaw it at the lengths needed for a door frame, you’ll end up with far more garbage than you will usable material. I would recommend visiting a hardwood dealer and looking for 4/4 poplar, maple, etc. My dealer sells 4/4 S4S poplar at 7/8 for around $2-3/bdft. With lumber like that, you would be ready to just start cutting and assembling.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View jonah's profile

jonah

453 posts in 1987 days


#11 posted 07-11-2014 12:35 PM

You could also get 5/4 S4S hardwood, which would be right around an inch thick. It starts out at 1.25 inches, but once they plane it down smooth it ends up usually a hair over one inch thick.

You are really much better off with a thickness planer than a bandsaw for making the stock you describe. Either that or find a dealer that sells S4S (surfaced four sides) 5/4 lumber. Resawing is really for splitting very thick stock into usable thinner pieces or making very thin (< 1/2”) pieces. If all you need is 1” stock, that’s something that any decent hardwood supplier will have in stock.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2598 posts in 1040 days


#12 posted 07-11-2014 01:20 PM

If you plan on doing much resawing a 14” saw is what you need as a minimum.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1663 posts in 409 days


#13 posted 07-11-2014 01:27 PM

Are you currently shopping for a band saw or do you already have one that you’re seeing if it will work for what you have in mind?

View lndfilwiz's profile

lndfilwiz

31 posts in 289 days


#14 posted 07-11-2014 01:35 PM

I have purchased 5/4 boards from HD in various grades. I use it for window frames.

-- Smile, it makes people wander what you are up to.

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