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Forum topic by Christian Holihan posted 07-08-2014 06:38 PM 1046 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Christian Holihan

85 posts in 1266 days


07-08-2014 06:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question resource

I am wondering about any experience you may have with a group build of single project.

I am finalizing the details of the first project for a non-profit I started. You can read about it here if you like:
http://lumberjocks.com/ChristianHolihan/blog/40464

I am envisioning 5-10 people in a shop working to create a Trestle Table from raw lumber to assembly in roughly 2 days. Different people at different stations cranking out pieces.

I would love your feedback on this question:
Does 5-10 people working on single project sound like a great idea, or is that to many people to have around with not enough for them to do at any one time?

Thanks for any experience or perspective.

-- Nobody deserves particle board | http://artisancare.org


14 replies so far

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1837 days


#1 posted 07-08-2014 07:53 PM

I think the part that’s going to make this somewhat difficult is the fact that you’re only making one table. If you had to crank out a few of them, you could really maximize on the assembly line type approach. With one table to make, I don’t know how you would go about it that wouldn’t leave most of those people waiting for someone else at any given point.

I think 3 or 4 people would be ideal for this. Persons A and B can run the jointer/planer to mill lumber. They could mill lumber for the legs, and then pass that on to persons C and D actually make the legs (if you had a pattern to route to, you could make sure the legs all come out the same). Persons A and B mill lumber for the top, then build the top. Assume the top is secured to the legs by bolts or something to make the joinery quicker/easier, and so the table can be transported.

What are you planning for a finish?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Christian Holihan's profile

Christian Holihan

85 posts in 1266 days


#2 posted 07-09-2014 02:21 PM

That is some good advice Ed. Thanks for your input.

The original table that I am recreating was finished with Tried and True Varnish oil. It takes a while, but the final product looks great!

-- Nobody deserves particle board | http://artisancare.org

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3210 days


#3 posted 07-09-2014 02:57 PM

They did something similar a few years ago at Marc Adams School.

They had a team build with Garry Bennett to build his trestle table for charity. The school screened which students would participate. The event was covered by FWW
See the videos here.
http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/video/gary-bennett-trestle-table-video.aspx

There are a series of 4 videos – they had a team of 7…that covers the whole build

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View Christian Holihan's profile

Christian Holihan

85 posts in 1266 days


#4 posted 07-09-2014 06:06 PM

That is a great resource Dr. Thank you!

-- Nobody deserves particle board | http://artisancare.org

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1829 days


#5 posted 07-09-2014 07:25 PM

It’s a gimmick idea without particular meaning or value.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1837 days


#6 posted 07-10-2014 12:40 PM

From Christian’s link :
1. Find a low income family in need.
2. Organize a group of local woodworkers to come together for a few weekends and build a dining room table.
3. Donate to family.


It s a gimmick idea without particular meaning or value.

- Clint Searl

That’s a pretty boneheaded comment.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 2160 days


#7 posted 07-11-2014 11:34 AM

A number of years back I had the honor of working with 3 other craftsmen of different skills on a project for a group I was involved in. The others that I worked with were a blacksmith, a jewler and a glass craftsman, I did the woodworking. We were contacted by another person whho had been contracted to do this job but found he didn’t have the skills required. He had had several months to accomplish this project and we were contacted 2 weeks before the project was to be completed. The project was a septer shaped as a trillium flower. The top/head being a forged trillium flower with a shaft of wood. Sounds simple right? NOT! Everything revolved around having the flower forged and our blacksmith is a true master, the flower he forged was from stainless steel and hand polished to a high shine. Once completed I turned the shaft from white oak. From my shop the septer went to our jewler friend and was adorned in silver work, which at the time was rather inexpensive. Engraving and custom jewlery work was added. At that point we decided that the septer needed a case in which it could be safely kept so back to my shop to build a wooden framed glass case with a mirror on the bottom which our glass artist etched with floral designs and the logo of the group we were making it for. Our task was completed the night before it was to be presented. It was a thing of beauty and of course were puffed up with pride in our work and accomplishing it on time. The next day when our project was presented to the woman it was made for she litterly almost fainted at the sight of our projectand and needed to be supported by her assistants. This and the ooos and ahhs from the croud were enough payment for us the craftsmen of this project.

All in all it was a great expierance for each of us and as I remember it there was very little pressure to accomplish this task within the time aloted because each of us knew our parts and our skills so that all went smoothly.

And as the late Paul Harvey said, “And now for the rest of the story.”
When the new owner of our project took it home they went to a local jewlery store to have our project assessed for insurance purposes. It was assessed at the time at over $4,ooo. Pretty good for some stainless steel, some oak, some bits of silver and some plate glass.
So bottom line, yes a group build can be a wonderful expierance for all envolved.
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1837 days


#8 posted 07-11-2014 11:43 AM

Mike, beautiful work. What was the scepter for?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Christian Holihan's profile

Christian Holihan

85 posts in 1266 days


#9 posted 07-11-2014 01:25 PM

Mike, that is a great story and the scepter looks amazing. Thanks for the encouragement.

-- Nobody deserves particle board | http://artisancare.org

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1188 days


#10 posted 07-11-2014 01:32 PM

This sounds similar to two different ideas that have proved valuable to everyone. 1) An Amish barn raising, except a piece of furniture for one of the families instead of a barn. Could be repeated a few times so all members involved walk away with something they can use (might be able to save on material by buying in bulk too). 2) Habitat for Humanity, except those benefiting would be required to help in the construction of their furniture instead of their home, much less involved.

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 2160 days


#11 posted 07-12-2014 11:47 AM

BinghamtonEd РIt was for the Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) kingdome of ̠thelmearc a present to the queen.

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View Christian Holihan's profile

Christian Holihan

85 posts in 1266 days


#12 posted 01-30-2015 04:54 PM

So after a lot of planning, we have completed our first build. I learned a lot from this first one and can’t wait to do it again this spring!

Have a look at the results: http://www.artisancare.org/family-affair

-- Nobody deserves particle board | http://artisancare.org

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 985 days


#13 posted 01-30-2015 05:07 PM

Well done. That is a great cause and beautiful table.

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

933 posts in 2160 days


#14 posted 02-07-2015 02:13 PM

Nice job. Nice design. I do like the plaque excellent touch, can easily be seen.

MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

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