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Forum topic by abie posted 07-08-2014 03:13 PM 1557 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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abie

818 posts in 3232 days


07-08-2014 03:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

My son has a bee in his bonnet and wants to build/design a router table using this aluminum, erector set material.. 80/20
Any feed back is appreciated
Also project plans appreciated….
Bruce AKA Abie
,

-- Bruce. a mind is like a book it is only useful when open.


20 replies so far

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2100 days


#1 posted 07-08-2014 04:23 PM

I’ve seen the stuff and it looks good, but pricey! They have CDs of various plans and maybe also plans on their web site.

-Paul

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2529 days


#2 posted 07-08-2014 04:31 PM

do a search on askwoodman. He uses this stuff all the time and makes a great TS fence over at verysupertools.com. He’d be the one to ask.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1182 days


#3 posted 07-08-2014 04:33 PM

It’s great stuff to work with and when bolted up can be very strong. If you can find it used you’ll save yourself a ton of money, but it doesn’t show up too often. The other nice thing is it can be cut on a miter saw with a non-ferrous blade almost as easily as you could cut a 2×4.

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JAAune

1640 posts in 1778 days


#4 posted 07-08-2014 04:37 PM

I can’t see the advantage of this over plywood for a router table. We used in on our CNC build but that’s a machine that needs more rigidity.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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firefighterontheside

13458 posts in 1318 days


#5 posted 07-08-2014 04:39 PM

Have a look at this.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/101471

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View brtech's profile

brtech

893 posts in 2384 days


#6 posted 07-08-2014 06:21 PM

One tip is that the cheapest way to do a right angle connection is to thread the end tubes, use a hex socket button head cap screw in the mating slot, and drill an access hole to get to the head of the screw with an Allen wrench from the outer side.

The 8020 guys auction lots of the stuff on Ebay pretty cheaply. Do watch out for shipping charges.

Design wise, I’m not sure if it makes any sense to have the extrusions be any part of the top. There isn’t a great way to fill in between struts with laminate. It’s possible, just a PITA. If you use a conventional top over an 8020 base it will be easy, but the off the shelf steel frame Grizzley sells does that for a whole lot less money.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2705 days


#7 posted 07-08-2014 07:53 PM

80-20 stuff is not so easy to work with. You have to know exactly how you want to put it together before ordering it. The extrusions are cut to size at the factory and once you have all the pieces, there is little chance of making changes. If there are parts you failed to account for, you could be stopped dead in your tracks. Users should have extra stock on hand for the inevitable modifications that happen. The material is not cheap. The 1”x1” extrusion costs (at last check) was 23¢ per INCH; 1-1/2”x1-1/2” costs 45¢ per inch, Nuts cost $1.60 each; corner brackets cost $3.95 each. After you add it all up plus cuts and shipping, the cost can be more than is justifiable to spend. I’ve thought about using 80-20 on other projects before, but found the cost much too steep.

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Loren

8301 posts in 3109 days


#8 posted 07-08-2014 08:19 PM

An application that uses the material to fuller advantage
might be an overhead router, a carving machine, a dado
machine, a panel saw, etc. Where a carriage needs to
move in a straight line the material has virtues. My panel
saw build used 90mm square Bosch Rexroth extrusions
and I found it to be adequately straight for the application.

The money to build a router table frame out of 80/20
might be spent on a welding machine and cheap (I mean
it’s real cheap) square steel tubing.

View MikeMcK's profile

MikeMcK

18 posts in 1429 days


#9 posted 09-11-2014 01:36 AM



80-20 stuff is not so easy to work with. You have to know exactly how you want to put it together before ordering it. The extrusions are cut to size at the factory and once you have all the pieces, there is little chance of making changes.

I’ve never worked with this material. Can I assume that it’s not recommended cutting the stock using my 12” mitre saw with a carbide blade?

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firefighterontheside

13458 posts in 1318 days


#10 posted 09-11-2014 01:43 AM

I would think you can cut it. Just have to do it slowly. I used to cut closet door tracks with mine. It’s probably easier to cut thicker aluminum than the thin stuff in those tracks.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2183 posts in 1487 days


#11 posted 09-11-2014 02:00 AM

Be sure to wear eye protection when you cut aluminum with a miter saw (or ts). Be sure NOT to wear fleece, as the chips stick like burrs.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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DIYaholic

19173 posts in 2137 days


#12 posted 09-11-2014 02:40 AM

I’ve also read, that a little WD40 helps….
When cutting with a MS or TS.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View timbertailor's profile

timbertailor

1591 posts in 886 days


#13 posted 09-11-2014 02:41 AM

Seems like the only guys that use this stuff on router applications is DIY CNC crowd.

If your dead set, use a carbide cross cut blade with a high tooth count. 60-80 is better. Use WD40 or other metal cutting\lubricating fluid.

And keep the feed rate slow. A good miter gauge is a must.

-- Brad, Texas, https://www.youtube.com/user/tonkatoytruck/feed

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NoThanks

798 posts in 991 days


#14 posted 09-11-2014 02:49 AM

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1182 days


#15 posted 09-11-2014 12:38 PM

I’ve cut the stuff many times with a nonferrous blade on a miter saw, it works better than a wood specific blade, but either will cut aluminum without a problem. There are generic extrusions out there, 80/20 can be expensive and the generics do offer substantial savings.

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