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Forum topic by kaurikid posted 45 days ago 935 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kaurikid

17 posts in 419 days


45 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: interesting wood

First photo is of the trunk and the second is of a small (80mm x 40mm x 4mm) sanded and lightly oiled piece and a larger piece (170mm x 40mm x 20mm) freshly cut and unsanded.

I was given 2 pieces of a tree trunk measuring about 40cm in diameter recently from a friend of a friend who had no information to offer about them. One piece of trunk I have cut up for future projects but try as I may I can’t find anything on the net to help giving it a name.

The wood is very heavy, dense and has a “herbal tea bag” smell to it. It doesn’t sand easily but eventually sands to a great finish.

I’d be very grateful if someone could help with info or a link. Thanks you guys

Regards
Steve

-- I started out with nothing and I still have a lot left!


19 replies so far

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

210 posts in 247 days


#1 posted 45 days ago

Did it come from a tree cut locally (and where is that)? That may give us some hints. Has bark been removed or is that the outside of the tree just like when it was standing? The olive color may be helpful, but I’d like to know where it came from.

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bigblockyeti

1469 posts in 347 days


#2 posted 45 days ago

Do you have a direct shot of the end grain? That may help with the ID.

View JonHitThingWithRock's profile

JonHitThingWithRock

85 posts in 348 days


#3 posted 45 days ago

the boards in the bottom picture look like mahogany to me

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Randy_ATX

672 posts in 1068 days


#4 posted 45 days ago

Osage Orange would be my guess.

-- Randy -- Austin, TX by way of Northwest (Woodville), OH

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LiveEdge

210 posts in 247 days


#5 posted 45 days ago

Osage Orange isn’t a bad guess. You can tell by taking some fresh shavings and putting them in a small glass of water. If the water turns yellow you have your ID.

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Yonak

243 posts in 147 days


#6 posted 45 days ago


Osage Orange isn t a bad guess. You can tell by taking some fresh shavings and putting them in a small glass of water. If the water turns yellow you have your ID.

- LiveEdge

Osage orange is a geat guess.

View Mario's profile

Mario

103 posts in 2022 days


#7 posted 45 days ago

Look closely at the end grain, if the pores are arranged in an orderly manner (even groups along defined bands) you might very well have osage orange, now if the pores are just all over the endgrain it could very likely be teak. Hard to tell just from color or growth rings on the debarked piece.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10721 posts in 1316 days


#8 posted 44 days ago

Looks like either hedge or mulberry from here. If it’s really hard/heavy, I vote for hedge.

hedge=Osage Orange

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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kaurikid

17 posts in 419 days


#9 posted 44 days ago

Thanks everyone for your suggestions and ideas. The wood was given to me here in China so I’m presuming it’s either native or an import from somewhere in Asia/The World? I don’t think its Osage Orange as the test with shavings in water proved negative.

I hope the end grain picture will suffice? I rubbed some linseed oil on the right half because it seemed to help bring out the grain, the left side has no oil or the like. The end grain is so tight it’s difficult to make out detail as Mario questioned.

I noticed the sawdust left on the band had turned a greenish color after a short time if that means anything to someone. I asked the guy about the bark and he tells me that’s how it was when he got it given to him.

The smell is quite strong and knowing the Chinese as I do this is the kind of smell they’d like wafting around their room I think. Not my cup of tea though much prefer the smell of a good curry!

Thanks to everyone that’s trying to help.

Regards
Steve

-- I started out with nothing and I still have a lot left!

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

210 posts in 247 days


#10 posted 44 days ago

This is not going by grain look and I’m not exactly familiar with Asian trees, but going by density and the possible fact that I’m looking at the “bark” on the round (and it hasn’t been removed), could it be eucalyptus? That’s not based on much though.

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Yonak

243 posts in 147 days


#11 posted 44 days ago

Ah so the facts are coming out. Steve, what answer did you get when you asked the giver where she got them?

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kaurikid

17 posts in 419 days


#12 posted 43 days ago

I received an email today from the guy that gave me the wood and he informs me that the name in Chinese is ( 玉檀香 ) which with Google Translate is “Jade Sandalwood”. From this I was able to find out more information on one of many sites such as this one:

http://www.copehardwoods.com/contents/en-ca/d3_palo_santo_hardwood_export_wholesale.html

I’ll let you decide if you want to find out more but I feel pretty sure this is my wood. I’m still open to anyone that can offer any more info on this wood that you feel I might be interested in.

Popular names used in the west seem to be Tineo and Palo Santo and it’s the 2nd densest hardwood in the world!

Thanks again to everyone.

Regards

Steve

-- I started out with nothing and I still have a lot left!

View LiveEdge's profile

LiveEdge

210 posts in 247 days


#13 posted 43 days ago

Just to clarify, Tineo and Palo Santo (verawood) are not the same woods. It looks like you are much closer to the second (also called Argentine Lignum Vitae) than the first.

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palaswood

694 posts in 378 days


#14 posted 43 days ago

As for end grain pics, you need to get A LOT CLOSER than that with clear focus -were looking for pores (tiny holes) or anything telling. And oil will severely darken end grain so sometimes its better to not oil it for close up ID purposes.

Palo santo is apparently an incense wood (ie sandalwood) so thats cool and would explain its aroma.

Incidentally, Eucalyptus wood doesnt have much of an odor, unlike its leaves.

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

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Tango

68 posts in 2179 days


#15 posted 43 days ago

Almost sure is Palo Santo (Bulnesia sarmientoi). The smell is characteristic to this species. In Paraguay (where I am from..) was very common (and precious) wood. Was declared an endangered species a couple of years ago. Very dense and hard, nice greenish color. Suitable for turning. The most exotic use I know of is the Dogfish brand Beer Palo Santo infused….”An unfiltered, unfettered, unprecedented brown ale aged in handmade wooden brewing vessels. The caramel and vanilla complexity unique to this beer comes from the exotic Paraguayan Palo Santo wood from which these tanks were crafted..”

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