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Forum topic by woodoogolem posted 07-06-2014 08:36 PM 960 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodoogolem

51 posts in 887 days


07-06-2014 08:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question rustic refurbishing

I bought some low grade hard wood (damson or plum) which apart from some cracks also has larger nests and stripes of rotten wood. In fruit trees this is often the case and results in areas similar to a sponge.

I don’t want to throw half of the wood away, I also wouldn’t care the rooten parts if they wouldn’t crumble off so easily. This white stuff rather gives the wood some character :-)

I tried my luck by soaking the areas with transparent PU resin. Now I have to wait for the resin to harden thoroughly.

What other methods have people sucessfully tried or what else could be worth trying?


7 replies so far

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Monte Pittman

21981 posts in 1798 days


#1 posted 07-06-2014 08:39 PM

Small areas with CA glue. Otherwise, tung oil will help.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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runswithscissors

2176 posts in 1485 days


#2 posted 07-06-2014 11:59 PM

Git Rot is specifically for that kind of problem. JB Weld makes a similar kit. They are a thin, slow cure epoxy that soaks into spongy wood and hardens it. Works pretty well as long as you won’t be subjecting the item to physical stresses

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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JoeWhite

24 posts in 1393 days


#3 posted 07-08-2014 06:32 PM

I’m looking to do something similar in some pine decking supports that I came across. I’ve planed them down and cleaned up the surfaces but there are still a lot of cracks. I want to turn the cracks in to a feature, maybe with some acrylic shavings or something to give it some color. Kind of like a veining look. Can I just mix some add some colored dust or chalk to the epoxy and fill in the cracks? And if so, how hard will it be to smooth out the epoxy with the wood?

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woodoogolem

51 posts in 887 days


#4 posted 07-08-2014 06:39 PM


Git Rot is specifically for that kind of problem. JB Weld makes a similar kit. They are a thin, slow cure epoxy that

Git Rot looks like what I would need :-) unfortunately it is not easily available here in Germany. Similar to JB Weld which is on ebay but ships from the States include a hefty shipping. So I will look how my resin works and post my results later.

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woodoogolem

51 posts in 887 days


#5 posted 07-08-2014 06:51 PM



Small areas with CA glue. Otherwise, tung oil will help.

For CA the areas are too large, but Tung is something I wanted to try anyway. Years ago I used hard oil for finishing but I think this would not be appropriate.

BTW: rotted or rotten?

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woodoogolem

51 posts in 887 days


#6 posted 07-08-2014 06:58 PM



Can I just mix some add some colored dust or chalk to the epoxy and fill in the cracks?

I have exactly done this. I sanded a scrap piece of this wood and filled empty areas. Then I let drops of resin soak in.

As mentioned in another post I am still waiting for the resin to harden. Then I want to try and sand or plane it. I will post about my results.

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CRJ

1 post in 878 days


#7 posted 07-08-2014 09:22 PM

for filling holes or cracks one can “color” 5 minute epoxy with saw dust. For black one can use ebony – it doesn’t take much to color the epoxy.

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