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Forum topic by ChefHDAN posted 07-05-2014 11:56 PM 1358 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


07-05-2014 11:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: oak

Hey LJ’s give me your opinion please, and the benefit of your expertise.

Church needs two candle stands which will be a total of 36”. from 3/4” red oak. I figure to construct the center as a box column with mitered edges so there will only be face grain. I’m considering cutting gothic arches into the top portion to mirror other designs on alter. I’m thinking to cut & bevel the 8 side pieces, then cut them across at 14” and then stack two sets of four with DS tape and cut the arches at the BS. The big question I’m wondering is if a 1.5” leg on each side of the arch glued at the miter to the adjoining face would be strong enough to resist any twist. The intended candle stand is +/- 4# max

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it


12 replies so far

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JAAune

1634 posts in 1776 days


#1 posted 07-06-2014 12:07 AM

It’s a candle stand and not a steering column so twisting forces should be negligible.

There are two types of forces it will likely have to deal with. One is wood movement so be sure the grain orientation and joinery accommodate that. The second situation involves people picking it up by the top and moving it around. Make sure the top can support the entire weight of the lower portion.

Besides, I suspect 1.5” wide boards would be fine even on a steering column. You’ve got something that has almost the same strength as a 1.5” square board once the two pieces are mitered together. Take a stick of wood with 1.5” square cross section in your hand and try breaking it by twisting it. You’ll need a ton of leverage to do that.

That candlestick was one I built when I used to work for Remmert Studios. It’s plenty strong for what it’s being used for and it’s basically just four 1 1/4” (going be memory here) thick pieces of wood mitered together at two spots.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#2 posted 07-06-2014 12:54 AM

Damn Jacob, that’s a fine piece.. Got me thinking but everything else on the altar has the arch in it.

Agree with the lift strength, which concerns me cutting it in half. Was thinking to either use pocket screws or maybe put a 1/2” stick of square stock on the inside.

How would you do the 1/4” recess in the top to fit the candle base? Was thinking a router base circle jig with the stock DS taped to the bench

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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JAAune

1634 posts in 1776 days


#3 posted 07-06-2014 01:20 AM

A lathe or CNC router would be my choice nowadays. heh

But in the past, I’d probably draw a circle with a compass then mill out the bulk of the circle freehand with a router starting from the center and working towards the outside. Before making the final pass I’d create a circle template from MDF and attach it to the top then run a hinge mortise bit against the template to get that perfect circle.

An alternative is to start with a thick board, resaw off a 5/16” thick slice, plane everything smooth, cut the circle on the scrollsaw and sand fair before gluing the two pieces back together.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#4 posted 07-06-2014 10:06 AM

There is no way I can use this as an excuse for a CNC or a Lathe, my wife would see right through that, but I could probably get away with the mortise bit, that sounds like a good way to get it perfect!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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mtenterprises

933 posts in 2152 days


#5 posted 07-06-2014 11:51 AM

I would use a miter lock joint router bit on the edges and then just glue it together. Nice basic design. Though I would be adding lots of fancy trim and molding. (Only my opinion)
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

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bigblockyeti

3663 posts in 1180 days


#6 posted 07-06-2014 12:11 PM

You shouldn’t have to worry about it twisting, as already mentioned, the forces this thing will endure aren’t that substantial.

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#7 posted 07-06-2014 03:37 PM

Mike, that’s a great idea, I’ve been looking at lock miter bits for quite awhile, perfect excuse to get one now. Not sure how I’ll dress it all up in the end, but I know I’ll add a few bits to the final assembly. Very tempted to try an inlay in the lower portion but I may not have the time to add it.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2319 days


#8 posted 07-06-2014 03:46 PM

If you get a lock miter joint bit, be sure to order the lock miter setting jig from Infinity Tools. It will save you a lot of time and aggravation setting up the bit.

Good Luck!

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1946 days


#9 posted 07-06-2014 03:56 PM

To go with the idea of the trim and finishing, I think I would add fluting with a router or chisel.
That would add depth of image and some nice shadow lines.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#10 posted 07-06-2014 07:43 PM

Herb, thanks for the heads up on Infinity, watched the set up video, and cancelled my other order for the infinity set up, not a cheap joint, but for the use this bit will probably see, I guess it’s worthwhile to go with a good one, and the jig is pretty nifty.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#11 posted 09-18-2014 01:40 AM

Many thanks to all of my LJ friends known and unknown for the help and advice they turned out pretty good, only I’ll see all of teh mistakes. It was a hell of a concept and I stretched a few muscles learning some new stuff.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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wseand

2754 posts in 2501 days


#12 posted 09-18-2014 08:34 AM

Great looking candle holders. Came out real nice

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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