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Forum topic by 1voyager1 posted 07-05-2014 09:07 PM 902 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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1voyager1

74 posts in 892 days


07-05-2014 09:07 PM

For my first try-out project I’m keeping it nice and easy.
I’ve made a simple jig for assembling rafts to mount orchids on.
Probably not of much interest to most people.

But, I have encountered a problem that will crop up when assembling the rafts in the jig.
The jig is constructed with a plywood base and 2×4 sides and slat locators.
The raft’s edge pieces are rabbeted at each end, then glued together in a bottom layer and a top layer with a middle layer of slats glued at each end between the top and bottom frames.

That may not be too clear, but what’s important is that the ends or the frame and slat pieces will be glued together while in the jig. I do not want the raft to glue to the jig. I need some kind of finish on the sides and bottom of the jig that will act as a parting agent, but will not in anyway be toxic to, or interfere with the root growth of the orchids.

I’ve considered coating the inside of the jig with petroleum jelly.
But, I worry about it getting on the raft and interfering with the orchid roots adhering to the wood of the raft.

Anyone have any ideas or thoughts on this problem?

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.


8 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

805 posts in 2309 days


#1 posted 07-05-2014 10:17 PM

I think we’re going to need a picture, When I’ve got a glue contact issue I use Johnson’s paste wax pretty frequently, but I have 0 idea of it’s effects on sensitive orchids

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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1voyager1

74 posts in 892 days


#2 posted 07-05-2014 11:21 PM

This is what the jig looks like:

The first frame layer goes in:

All the ends of the frame pieces are rabbeted.
Glue will be applied as the pieces are assembled:

Then, the slats of the middle layer are installed with glue applied where they will be touching the bottom and top frames. The spacers on the L & R sides are added for strength and rigidity:

Then, the pieces of the top frame are assembled the same as those of the bottom frame were:

Finally, 2 pieces of 2X4 that just fit into the jig will be clamped over the upper and lower edges to compress the glue joints until they have set.

Actually, not very complicated.
Just not set up for high speed production.

I need to keep the glue that is squeezed out of the joints from gluing the raft into the jig.
I had made some of these raft jigs back in Alaska.
I had some thin sheets of a teflon type cutting surface that I had cut up to fit the inside.
They worked pretty good except that they had to be assembled into the jig as the pieces were placed in.
I have not been able to find anything like them around here yet. So, I’m considering a finish of some kind to act as the parting agent.

Orchids are not all that fragile.
In fact they’re pretty tough.
I simply do not want to inhibit their healthy growth.
It’s like you don’t use copper piping in a fish hatchery.
Copper is toxic to marine life.

Note:
I had fun ripping the 15” strip of 1/2” plywood off the end of a 4’X8’ sheet with no supports or help.
It had been a long time since the last time I’d had to do that.
But I had always had side and out feed supports set up.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2150 days


#3 posted 07-06-2014 12:10 AM

Shellac is non toxic. I prefinish insides of boxes before glue up so I can clean up squeeze out in the corners.

Blue painter’s tape is another option.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1811 days


#4 posted 07-06-2014 12:11 AM

Coat it with paste wax, the glue won’t stick to anything with paste wax on it.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2319 days


#5 posted 07-06-2014 06:20 PM

Why not line the jig surfaces with UHMW Polyethylene film?

Source: McMaster Carr

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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Crank50

173 posts in 1036 days


#6 posted 07-06-2014 08:51 PM

Glad Wrap is polyethylene film; and no glue sticks to it,

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2319 days


#7 posted 07-06-2014 09:51 PM

The film I referenced is available with adhesive backing, making it possible to line the jig neatly.

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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1voyager1

74 posts in 892 days


#8 posted 07-08-2014 03:40 AM

Thanks folks they’re all good possibilities for dealing with the glue problem.
I think I’ll try the quick and dirty method first.

The new blade for my new saw just arrived today.
I had also ordered a can of paste wax for the saw’s table.
It arrived with the blade.
After waxing the table, I waxed the jig.
If it doesn’t work all I’ll lose is 13 feet of 3/4” X 3/4” redwood.

It’s time to move on to making an out feed table for the saw.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

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