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Is this table saw a good 1st saw for the money?

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Forum topic by watermark posted 07-05-2014 06:48 AM 4593 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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watermark

482 posts in 1406 days


07-05-2014 06:48 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

This Delta 36-510 tablesaw is on CL for $45.

Just looking for opinions if this would be a good 1st TS or would it be better to spend some more $$$ on a newer saw.

It’s a 20yr old saw and I already checked ereplacementparts.com and parts don’t look easy to find.

-- "He who has no dog, hunts with a cat" Portuguese proverb


13 replies so far

View Heavy's profile

Heavy

118 posts in 2051 days


#1 posted 07-05-2014 07:18 AM

Well for 45$ I am sure you will find a use for it. I don’t know what you are planning to use it for but it may come in handy. Just don’t expect to rip some hardwoods without problem. These saws are made for small stuff that you need done on site.

View OhioMike's profile

OhioMike

73 posts in 1626 days


#2 posted 07-05-2014 09:29 AM

It wouldn’t be my first choice for a woodworking shop. If you’re looking for a real bargain in a used table saw, look for an old Emerson-built Craftsman contractor’s saw. The model number will start with 113.

They show up on Craig’s list regularly around here and go for between $75 and $200. They can be tuned for good accuracy and can accept aftermarket fences and miter gauges as finances allow.

They look like this:

Mike

EDIT: Here’s one with optional cast iron wings (nice) but might be too far away from you.

https://honolulu.craigslist.org/mau/tls/4532204410.html

View toolie's profile

toolie

2023 posts in 2092 days


#3 posted 07-05-2014 11:33 AM

+1 on the 113 series saws. i have two of them, one a c-man the other a 2412 built for ridgid. i opted to keep them over a 70s vintage 3hp unisaw i refurbed and sold, finding that the unisaw didn’t add any accuracy to my WWing and that, as a hobbyist, i’d never have a need for it’s ability to run all day long in a commercial environment.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View JimRochester's profile (online now)

JimRochester

376 posts in 1078 days


#4 posted 07-05-2014 11:49 AM

Obviously it will make two pieces of wood where previously there was one. But those style of saws are really for the jobsite not the woodworking shop. For small stuff it will work but it will have a tough time on anything over 3/4 and the accuracy will probably not be what you are looking for.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1760 days


#5 posted 07-05-2014 12:41 PM

If you need a light saw to throw in the back of a truck and rip the occasional piece of one by material, buy it. Otherwise look for one of the old Sears as suggested.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1184 days


#6 posted 07-05-2014 12:52 PM

It would be better used as an occasion on-site saw vs. your first that you’re doing all your cutting on. A contractor saw would be a better bet and patience will eventually reveal a decent example for around $100.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4028 posts in 1814 days


#7 posted 07-05-2014 01:23 PM

I agree w/ the other posters, that is not a good first saw. The Craftsman 113. series is the way to go, I bought mine 30 years ago and I still use it everyday.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2227 posts in 1910 days


#8 posted 07-05-2014 01:30 PM

I had one like it,tried to sell it for $25 ,couldn’t ,so I gave it away.while I had it I only used a few times .terrible choice for a hobby woodworking shop.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View toolie's profile

toolie

2023 posts in 2092 days


#9 posted 07-05-2014 03:18 PM

  • it will have a tough time on anything over 3/4 and the accuracy will probably not be what you are looking for.*

I emphatically disagree with this statement. A quick review of the projects in WOOD magazine will often reveal the project pieces being fabricated on a ridgid 3650. Additionally, having owned a unisaw, the panacea of old cabinet saws, I can report with first hand authority that it was no more accurate than either of my 113 series contractor saws. Al one needs to do, assuming the contractor saw has not been abused, is take the time to dial it in and it will do just about anything a hobbyist wants to do. I have ripped 8/4 hardwoods without incident. I didn’t shove them through the 113s like I could the unisaw, but with the proper blade and a little patience regarding the feed rate, the task was accomplished without incident. IMHO, the right contractor saw, set up and equipped properly, can be a forever saw Capable of delivering fine woodworking results.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View JimRochester's profile (online now)

JimRochester

376 posts in 1078 days


#10 posted 07-05-2014 03:48 PM

Toolie, wasn’t referring to the 113, I was referring to the one he had pictured. What little I’ve heard about them indicated a lack of power and a lack of precision for our type of woodworking. I agree the 113 is ma superior saw if he can find one

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#11 posted 07-05-2014 05:04 PM

The ABCs of Table Saws

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7481 posts in 1470 days


#12 posted 07-05-2014 05:22 PM

Did anyone else realize that this guy is in HAWAII?

I seem to recall someone else from Hawaii mentioning that there’s not a whole lot of choices in woodworking equipment on the island. I’m thinking that the CL listings are pretty dismal there… just like here in my tiny little town.

This MIGHT be a good “starter saw” till something else comes along.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View watermark's profile

watermark

482 posts in 1406 days


#13 posted 07-06-2014 12:53 AM

Thanks for all the advice. I think I will let this one go if it’s not already gone. Plan was to get up this morning check this forum and make a decision but my real job got in the way…

I had an old craftsman not a 113 though that still had a strong motor but the mechanism to raise and lower the blade broke so I gave it away before looking into repairing it. The guy had it running in 2 weeks cleaned up like a brand new saw.

JoeinGA- your right pickings are slim and prices are high on the good stuff.

-- "He who has no dog, hunts with a cat" Portuguese proverb

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