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Cutting Board Repair Help

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Forum topic by Chris posted 06-27-2014 06:24 PM 752 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chris

164 posts in 1045 days


06-27-2014 06:24 PM

I am new to wood working and I am trying to repair a cutting board. I found it in my wife’s dad’s wood shop. Her dad has passed away and I thought I would give repairing/finishing a shot. The first thing I did was used some glue/clamps to reattach one of the strips of wood to the rest of the board. I just used a leaf blower to get the glue in the seam and then clamped it. I think it turned out pretty solid.

The next step was to sand it down. There was a couple places where it was chipped and I have been using an orbital sander at 120 grit to get down past those chips before trying to finish. Well, as I was sanding last night, I found that the board was not flat anymore, probably because I bogged the orbital sander down in some places making it uneven.

At this point, I am wondering what my options are. I do have access to a planer I would just need to go to a friend’s house for it. I have read that it is not smart to use a planer on an end grain cutting board but I don’t think this is an end grain cutting board. Maybe I am wrong? The only sander I have is the orbital sander I mentioned above. Any other ideas? I am definitely new to this stuff so please share thoughts, concerns, etc.

Here are some pics of the board:


5 replies so far

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1830 days


#1 posted 06-27-2014 06:28 PM

That’s not an end grain board. Looks to be edge grain (could be face grain but probably not). It doesn’t look to be cupped or anything. Go ahead with the planer. Take light cuts (1/32ish). You can scribble all over the surface with a pencil. Keep taking light cuts, and when the pencil is all gone, you’ve planed the whole surface. Flip it over and repeat.

Some of the edges look a little rough. After it’s planed, I would take a light pass on the rough sides on the table saw, then round over the edges with a sanding block, router (hey there’s one in the background), or block plane. Or, if it’s just the one strip you glued back on, sand or plane it to match the rest.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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Chris

164 posts in 1045 days


#2 posted 06-27-2014 06:32 PM

Thanks Ed for the advice. Pic 1 is of the bored at glue up, and pic 3 is of the board once after glue up, routing, and a little sanding. At the point in pic 3, it was dead flat, and I just kept sanding to try to get down in the board and get those chips out. I don’t have any current pics of the board up there where it is a little uneven now.

Thanks for the advice though. I will take it slow on my friends planer.

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UncannyValleyWoods

441 posts in 1325 days


#3 posted 06-27-2014 06:46 PM

To add to what BinhamtonEd said…Be sure you do not over clamp. We are making cutting boards here, not diamonds. You just need enough pressure to get a little glue squeeze out and that’s it. Over clamping will ruin a good cutting board faster than anything.

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/UncannyValleyWoods?ref=hdr_shop_menu

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Chris

164 posts in 1045 days


#4 posted 06-27-2014 07:10 PM

Thank you for the tip. To be honest, this was my first project using pipe clamps or a router. So, I had no idea how much pressure to add to each one.

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UncannyValleyWoods

441 posts in 1325 days


#5 posted 06-27-2014 07:14 PM

It’s all good. You will learn volumes with each project. Keep working outside your comfort zone!

-- https://www.etsy.com/shop/UncannyValleyWoods?ref=hdr_shop_menu

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