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White stained item turns yellow

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Forum topic by kat posted 12-11-2006 08:14 PM 5173 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kat

18 posts in 2877 days


12-11-2006 08:14 PM

I was wondering if anyone else has the problem of white stain turning yellow on a finished item after a few months? Am I doing something wrong?
kat

-- Kathy, Kersey Colorado, kh1@hughes.net


12 replies so far

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 3000 days


#1 posted 12-12-2006 01:20 AM

Hi Kat! Did you put a clear coat over the stain? I’ve used lacquer and convertion varnish with no problem on oak maple and alder. I did have yellowing problems putting a clear lacquer over a white lacquer. It was just on some samples but the home owner used that color to pick her paint! I felt really bad! She did put another coat of paint on that matched my new samples. Luckly we found out before I finished the kitchen.

View kat's profile

kat

18 posts in 2877 days


#2 posted 12-12-2006 01:59 AM

Hi Dennis, I have not tried lacquer but I’ll give it a shot. Mybe that will keep it from turning a dirty looking white. Have a happy holiday!!
Kat

-- Kathy, Kersey Colorado, kh1@hughes.net

View thewoodwhisperer's profile

thewoodwhisperer

601 posts in 2870 days


#3 posted 12-12-2006 03:29 AM

Hi Kathy. Make sure you use a “water white” finish, which basically means it is non-yellowing. Most finishes, like oils and lacquers, can yellow over time. When color accuracy is an issue, my go to topcoat is a CAB-acrylic lacquer from Sherwin Williams. Waterborne poly is also a good water-white option.
Just make sure you read the label carefully. If it doesn’t say “water white” or non-yellowing, it will most likely yellow over time.

Good luck!!

Marc

-- For free video tutorials and other cool woodworking stuff, check out http://www.TheWoodWhisperer.com

View kat's profile

kat

18 posts in 2877 days


#4 posted 12-12-2006 03:54 PM

Hi Marc, Thank you. You have been VERY helpful. Have a great day!
Kathy

-- Kathy, Kersey Colorado, kh1@hughes.net

View Mark A. DeCou's profile

Mark A. DeCou

1996 posts in 3091 days


#5 posted 12-15-2006 04:41 PM

Hey Kat: I’m not sure what your project is, but if it is small, a trick I learned several years ago making knives might work. When I have a wood that is light color, and I want to keep it that way, I use Thin CA glue as a light “finish” over the wood before applying any other type of wood finish. I used spalted hackberry once that had some great black and green spalting lines that would just blend with the white background wood whenever I used any type of wood finish. I tried the CA glue method, and the colors held, allowing the sharp contrasts in color to show. After the CA glue is dry, I lightly sanded the wood, and applied a regular finish such as lacquer, or polyurethane. I did this on a handle and some accent striping on a carving chisel carrying case I made several years ago, and the Hackberry is still fairly light in color, although not as light as it used to be. If you could give some details about your project, maybe someone has something that would work better for you.
Mark

-- Mark DeCou - American Contemporary Craft Artisan - www.decoustudio.com

View kat's profile

kat

18 posts in 2877 days


#6 posted 12-17-2006 04:16 AM

Hi Mark. Thanks for the help!!!! I ordered some CA glue from Rockler. I should get it in about 2 days and then I plan to try your method. As for the wood question, I live in Kersey and I am not too far from Denver. Denver is probably the best chance I have. I use 1” Red Oak for my clocks. I like the properties and natural beauty of Oak. There are MANY exotics out there that are very beautiful but most of them are very expensive. I do use quarter inch Balck Walnut, Limba and Mubangu, White Oak and Red Oak to scroll on. I ordered a bunch of every kind I use from Arizona a few months ago but it is as if they vanished!!!! They worked great.
Have a Great Xmas!!!

Kathy

-- Kathy, Kersey Colorado, kh1@hughes.net

View Obi's profile

Obi

2213 posts in 2923 days


#7 posted 12-20-2006 11:48 AM

I used polyurethane over maple and the stuff yellowed terribly. I found out several things. I wasn’t letting the stain sit long enough before applying the finish coat and polyurethane yellows.

View kat's profile

kat

18 posts in 2877 days


#8 posted 12-20-2006 01:57 PM

Hi Michael, I do believe it is the polyurethane. I’m going to try the CA glue and lacquer. I have a piece stained white snd ready to finish.I am just waiting for the glue. I ordered it.
Have a great Xmas! Looks like we are going to have a white one. Its a blizzard outside right now!!!
Kathy

-- Kathy, Kersey Colorado, kh1@hughes.net

View Mark A. DeCou's profile

Mark A. DeCou

1996 posts in 3091 days


#9 posted 12-20-2006 06:51 PM

Hey Kat: just a caution for you, the CA glue has a very strong odor, I mean very strong. Not like Deft Lacquer, but much worse. You’ll want to be cautious about working with it in a large quantity during the winter with closed windows. This summer I used 12-14, 4 oz bottles sealing up cracks and knots in my China Hutch and Dining Table I built. The smell can deaden your nostrils to the point that you don’t really smell it after awhile, until you start to feel bad, which happened to me a few times even with all of the shop windows open, and the vent fan running. What I learned to do with so much of it out wet at one time was to do it before I quit at night, and then went into the house while it was curing.

I put my source for CA glue in the Skills Forum under “What Glue to Use”, which is quite a bit cheaper than Rockler, and I can get bigger bottles from them. I like Rockler and use them for just about everything else I need. I use www.rocklerpro.com which usually is something like 20% less than their regular website. I think you need a tax number as a business to sign up for it, but they have special pricing for professional woodworkers.

You will not want to use the Activator spray with your thin coating of CA glue, as it will turn the CA white-ish, or cloudy. Just use the Thin CA and put it on reall lightly, covering all of the wood, and then let it cure naturally. It can be brushed, but I learned to just use the bottle tip to spread it out while I squirted it out on the wood. Then you can lightly sand to get it smooth after the CA dries. This technique on Oak and Walnut, and other open grain woods will not fill the grain pores, but will seal the wood and hopefully prevent it from turning yellow on you.

Also, I have learned that if I stay away from Paint Thinner thinned finishes, it yellows less, meaning I use Lacquer most of the time. I like the durability of Polyurethane, but keeping a dust free environment in my little shop while it is drying beyond tacky is just impossible. I have learned that if I put down fill coats of lacquer, and let it cure for 2-3 weeks, I can put a coat of either wipe-on poly, or spray poly over the top of the lacquer.

You’ll want to practice on a non-project board before you do your project wood,
let us all know how it works,
mark

-- Mark DeCou - American Contemporary Craft Artisan - www.decoustudio.com

View kat's profile

kat

18 posts in 2877 days


#10 posted 12-20-2006 09:07 PM

Hi Mark, Thanks for the heads up!! I have been known to use that kind of stuff in inclosed areas. Years ago I varnished a door in a very enclosed area. About three fourths of the way through the project my ears started to ring really loud. I knew I screwed up. It took a couple of days for the ringing to stop. I will check out the website. As far as tax numbers go I have just used my SS #. I don’t know if they will accept that but I’ll check. I was hoping to get the glue today but all the main roads and hwy’s are closed because of the blizzard we are having. It might be a couple of day’s.
Kat

-- Kathy, Kersey Colorado, kh1@hughes.net

View Mark A. DeCou's profile

Mark A. DeCou

1996 posts in 3091 days


#11 posted 12-22-2006 04:12 AM

Oh my gosh, I can’t believe I didn’t remember this sooner. I was tucking the kids into bed, and all of a sudden it dawned on me. I don’t understand the connection, but it worked.

I know a guy that builds custom pool cues and uses a lot of maple. About 4 years ago I was touring his shop and I was astonished at how white the maple was after the cues were finished and I asked if he would tell me the secret. He said that he uses Clear Acrylic Paint that he buys from a supplier that sells to Autobody shops. It is the same clear coating that is applied to cars when they are custom painted. This was a surprise to me, as I hadn’t thought of making the connection before.

After that I found stumbled onto some clear Acrylic in a spray can at Walmart, and have since used it once in awhile on my walking canes, like when I am out of Deft but need to finish up a cane that night.

The stuff is inexpensive, like under $3/can, so you might give it a try.

Hope something works,
Mark

-- Mark DeCou - American Contemporary Craft Artisan - www.decoustudio.com

View kat's profile

kat

18 posts in 2877 days


#12 posted 12-23-2006 02:14 AM

Hi Mark, I went to Walmart earily today and bought the clear acyilic. This afternoon I finished the clock. I posted it in new projects. Hope it stays white! Take a peek if you get a chance. I had to use white with this mermaid because I scrolled her out of Black Limba and it has gray and black colors in it. Because of the gray and black it won’t blend with just any wood color. I guess I could have stained her a different color but I wanted the natural color of the wood.
kat

-- Kathy, Kersey Colorado, kh1@hughes.net

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