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Additional face frame question

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Forum topic by woodworkingdrew posted 06-23-2014 04:23 AM 875 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1073 days


06-23-2014 04:23 AM

anyone ever make face frames from Doug fir? I would like to joint and plane down 2×4 for face frames.

-- Andrew, California


11 replies so far

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1951 posts in 1452 days


#1 posted 06-23-2014 01:25 PM

With 2×4 stock you never really know what you are going to get. Most of it has a higher than desired moisture content and takes some time to dry. In addition, it has a tendency to warp. If you want to use it, I would make certain that the wood is dry, plane down the boards and then wait awhile to see if it is going to warp before making face frames.

I use 2×4 for making some things for the shop but just plane them far enough to get good clean wood somewhere around 1.25×3.25. I usually wait a week or so and see if it is going to warp. Sometimes, I am lucky and other times have generated quite a bit of scrap.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 950 days


#2 posted 06-23-2014 01:27 PM

Give it a shot a see what happens. Anything is possible.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1073 days


#3 posted 06-23-2014 01:37 PM

The problem I am having is the poplar and other woods I purchase are slightly over 3/4 inch and by the time I get the board face jointed its less then 3/4. I need a thicker board to get it more square.

-- Andrew, California

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1833 days


#4 posted 06-23-2014 01:58 PM

Where are you getting your lumber? You should have no problem getting 3/4” oifyou’re buying decent poplar or similar at a hardwood dealer. If you’re buying at a HD or Lowes, you’re starting off pretty close to 3/4 already. Buy S2S 4/4 at a hardwood dealer and you’ll probably start at 7/8, which should be more than enough.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7173 posts in 2041 days


#5 posted 06-23-2014 02:03 PM

Only purchase FaS ( First and Second ) graded hardwood for your
face frame at a hardwood dealer as mentioned above.

http://aurahardwoods.com/products/lumber/

210 Phelan Avenue
San Jose, CA 95112
1-800-411-2872
P 408-275-1990
F 408-287-8547
M-F 8:00-4:30
SAT 8:00-12:00

D. fir has been used for garage cabs but not for anything else.

HTH

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1489 days


#6 posted 06-24-2014 07:46 AM

Up here in the Pacific NW, Doug fir has been used for cabinetry for a long, long time. But vertical grain stuff, not the kind of anything-goes grain you get in BORG 2×4s. There is very little of the vertical grain stuff left; most of it is salvaged from old construction.

Yeah, I know you guys in the rest of the country call it quarter sawn. But up here it’s vertical grain.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Nomad62

726 posts in 2422 days


#7 posted 06-25-2014 03:46 PM

The wood used here in NW Oregon is as wet as it can be; they cut the logs, then treat the pieces with a mold and bug killer, then stack and sell it…just that fast. It dries quickly, but does change shape (sometimes dramatically) as it does. Gotta take the time to pick out nice, straight grain, tough to do sometimes. But, to answer your question, I know a few window makers that use Doug fir with success, and they have good contacts with reliable sellers that will call them first when a good shipment comes in.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2695 days


#8 posted 06-25-2014 06:16 PM



Where are you getting your lumber? You should have no problem getting 3/4” oifyou re buying decent poplar or similar at a hardwood dealer. If you re buying at a HD or Lowes, you re starting off pretty close to 3/4 already. Buy S2S 4/4 at a hardwood dealer and you ll probably start at 7/8, which should be more than enough.

- BinghamtonEd

What Ed said. I am building kitchen cabinets with poplar face frames. I bought 4/4 rough poplar, and milled it to 3/4 inch.

Here is an example.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View woodworkingdrew's profile

woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1073 days


#9 posted 06-25-2014 06:36 PM

I do get the s2s stuff at 7/8 but it is incredibly bowed. I thought of the Doug fir because of the thickness.

-- Andrew, California

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1833 days


#10 posted 06-25-2014 07:13 PM

Where do you get it? Sounds like you need a new source. Any lumber, regardless of how it’s been surfaced, might bow a little just from sitting around and acclimating more, while waiting to be bought. However, if it’s so bowed that you can’t get 3/4 out of it, look elsewhere. Also, how long is the stock, and how long is your jointer bed? If your stock is longer than the infeed table and fairly bowed, you may be able to do a few partial passes on either end to level it out more before you feed it completely over the cutter, which would mean you would need to take off less altogether.

A slight bow can be pulled straight once the face frames are attached to the cabinet boxes.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2853 posts in 2695 days


#11 posted 06-25-2014 07:58 PM

I don’t know if you have tried it, but I plan what size I will need for rails and stiles and other parts. Then I cut the boards to length leaving a little on each end for snipe, unforseen splits, etc.

These boards are usually 4/4 rough approx 5-6 inches wide. I pick out the best ones I can find that are available. Some may be bowed one way or the other.

After I get them home, I cut them to the rough lengths, then rip a straight edge on one side using a sled I made for my table saw. I also have a track saw if needed. Cutting into shorter lengths helps to minimize the bow so when I rip one edge straight, I can save as much material as possible.

Next up is a pass or three on the jointer. Mine is only a 6 inch Jet, so if there is any overhang, I clean it up with a hand plane. After I have that one side flat, I run it on the previously ripped edge to get my 90 deg edge. Then it is off to the planer for some thickness planing. Later I will rip up the pieces into the widths needed, and finally trim both ends of each one to it’s final length.

Note: There will always be a little waste. :-(

Hope this helps you in any way.
Mike

All started as 4/4 poplar 5-6 inches wide; 9 – 13 feet long.

Raised panel doors…

And drawer fronts

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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