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Forum topic by woodworkingdrew posted 06-22-2014 05:59 PM 1586 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1075 days


06-22-2014 05:59 PM

I have two questions.

1. What methods are out there for attaching face frames to the carcuss

2. Is it common practice to leave a 1/4 inch overhang on the face frame?

-- Andrew, California


11 replies so far

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1184 posts in 2945 days


#1 posted 06-22-2014 07:13 PM

1. I dado FF and glue, but looking at spline more now

2. I think so

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#2 posted 06-22-2014 08:10 PM

1) For kitchen style cabinets, I use pocket screws and apply a skin on the finished ends if it will show. When I built, the buffet, I didn’t have to skin anything. On mom's cabinets, I attached a mdf panel to the end next to the refrigerator.

Same for Shelley's wet bar.

2) The 1/4 inch allows the installer room to scribe the cabinet to the wall if necessary.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Sawdust4Blood's profile

Sawdust4Blood

392 posts in 2488 days


#3 posted 06-22-2014 11:31 PM

I either use pocket screws or biscuits. First choice is pocket screws by a large margin because they are a lot easier than getting the alignment perfect on the biscuits. Only advantage to the biscuits is they are completely hidden without having to skin over.

I typically make my overhang about an 1/8th unless I think that I will need to scribe to a wall. You definitely want to leave at least an 1/8 even if you aren’t scribing because that little gap between cabinets also lets you adjust for walls that aren’t completely flat and still have the faces look right.

-- Greg, Severn MD

View English's profile

English

517 posts in 943 days


#4 posted 06-23-2014 01:48 AM

I use pocket screws, Glue and Biscuits, I really don’t want them to come off

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#5 posted 06-23-2014 02:03 AM

“I use pocket screws, Glue and Biscuits, I really don’t want them to come off”

John, have you ever tried to remove a face frame after the glue dries? I have. I removed all of the pocket screws and couldn’t beat the frame off without busting it up. I finally gave up. :-(

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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English

517 posts in 943 days


#6 posted 06-23-2014 02:14 AM

No, I have never had a need to, but if I did I would just build a new box. They are not coming off.

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

View woodworkingdrew's profile

woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1075 days


#7 posted 06-23-2014 02:26 AM

MT- I read and heard somewhat the same thing. I think its very effective to just use glue alone.

-- Andrew, California

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#8 posted 06-23-2014 02:37 AM

“No, I have never had a need to, but if I did I would just build a new box. They are not coming off.”

That is exactly what I had to do.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View DLCW's profile

DLCW

530 posts in 2120 days


#9 posted 06-26-2014 01:51 AM

For attaching faceframes to carcasses, I use biscuits mainly for alignment. Modern glues will hold a faceframe to a carcass very well. I’ve experimented and have found I can’t break a faceframe from a REAL plywood carcass. MDF, melamine or particle board carcasses are a different story. Easy to break the faceframe from the carcass. So I guess the answer here is, it depends on your carcass material.

For cabinets mounted side by side I use 1/16” faceframe overlay. For cabinets that will butt against a wall, the amount of overlay depends on well the kitchen walls were done. If done well, I will leave 3/16”. If done the ussual way, I will leave 1/4”. For end cabinets, I will leave either 3/16” or 1/4” on the side so that cabinet can be scribed to the wall.

I have customers that don’t want this level of sophistication (read price) in their installation, so I will have a simple 1/16” overlay on faceframes and use scribe molding to fill any gaps. Scribe molding, for those who don’t know what it is, is a 3/4” wide x 1/8” thick piece of faceframe stock that is applied using a pin nailer. The pin is virtually invisible. Customer saves money and it still looks very nice.

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

View Todd's profile

Todd

384 posts in 1143 days


#10 posted 06-26-2014 11:06 PM

If it is a shop cabinet I use pocket screws, unless it will be painted then I just use glue and an 18g brad nailer. For nicer stuff I use the Sommerfeld Tongue and Groove set:

Which is what I used on this nightstand.

Click for details

-- Todd, Huntsville, AL

View RogerM's profile

RogerM

764 posts in 1865 days


#11 posted 06-27-2014 01:36 PM

Ditto on the Sommerfield’s Own (tongue and groove) system. I have used this system for at least 4 years and love it.

With respect to the overhang question I do both. Leave an overhang on a set of wall cabinets that will be butted to each other or one that needs to be coped to a wall. Make them flush for furniture or free standing pieces. The Sommerfield’s Own system will easily accomplish both.

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

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