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Removinf rust stains from nails on white oak floor?

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Forum topic by Canofworms posted 06-20-2014 08:23 PM 829 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Canofworms

93 posts in 246 days


06-20-2014 08:23 PM

I read oxalic acid will remove it.
They are well absorbed in the wood about 1/2 to 3/4 inch around each nail and there are about 20 of them.
Any advice?


29 replies so far

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Canofworms

93 posts in 246 days


#1 posted 06-22-2014 05:53 PM

Anyone?

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freddy1962

909 posts in 293 days


#2 posted 06-22-2014 06:04 PM

Pictures may help.

-- JEFF Illinois (Banks of the Mississippi)

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bandit571

7470 posts in 1427 days


#3 posted 06-22-2014 06:07 PM

Dutchman might work. The kind you make. Not the Dutchgirl powder. The black is a reaction between the Tannin in the wood and the iron in the nail. Maybe the stuff the take out Lime Rust & stains.?

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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shampeon

1378 posts in 927 days


#4 posted 06-22-2014 06:43 PM

Bandit is correct that it’s a reaction between the tannins and the iron. Oxalic acid will remove those kind of stains, but any moisture will cause it to happen again. Barkeeper’s Friend, available in any hardware store and many drug stores next to the Ajax, is detergent and oxalic acid. Maybe try a test on one to see if it works, and go from there?

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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Canofworms

93 posts in 246 days


#5 posted 06-22-2014 07:22 PM

I have 4 products to try.
The floor has been sanded already. I need to make sure it is Nuetralized before staining.
Tsp
Naval jelly
Lemon juice and salt
Calcium lime rust remover product

What’s Dutchman?
I tried the four plus a pencil eraser. The eraser made it worse.
All four worked to some degree. I dabbed on and waited 15 minutes. Then wet vacuumed excess off and then blotted and rinsed with water and then vacuum again.

The naval jelly worked the best.these are before and after pics

One thing I need to keep in mind is that he can sand these spots heavy after i treat spots or they will come back. I will only be able to re

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Canofworms

93 posts in 246 days


#6 posted 06-22-2014 09:13 PM

Ok how do I use the barkeeper friend?
Just scour it?

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bandit571

7470 posts in 1427 days


#7 posted 06-22-2014 09:59 PM

A Dutchman is a patch of thin wood. You can either match the surrounding grain/colour, or make it a contrasting design. Route out a recess to house the patch ( enough to cover the defect) and glue the patch in.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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Finisherman

210 posts in 593 days


#8 posted 06-24-2014 06:29 PM

Oxalic acid will likely work. You can buy it in crystaline form as wood bleach at a store that sells professional finishing supplies. You mix the oxalic acid crystals with hot water until you have a saturated solution, meaning that no more crystals will dissolve into the hot water. Just brush the solution onto the surface and let it dry. If the stains aren’t entirely gone, repeat the process as necessary. After the stains are gone, neutralize the surface with a solution of baking soda and water, as you’ve been doing. I’m a little bit surprised that the naval jelly is removing the black stains as well as the rust, unless of course, the naval jelly contains oxalic, as well as phosphoric acid. If it works, it works. As others have said, barkeeper’s friend contains oxalic acid, as does Dutch boy cleanser. I’d apply either of those with just enough water to make a thin paste and then wait and neutralize as described above.

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Canofworms

93 posts in 246 days


#9 posted 06-24-2014 08:53 PM

So my first question is how can I neutralize this without baking soda? Can I just repeatedly rinse with water?

OK. So I used the baking soda as a wet paste as a neutralizer for a few spots and let sit 20 minutes.
The dark stains came back and the stain actually wicked out into the board more than before leaving a large dull stain extending 1lmost 2 inches around the initial nail hole.
This is not your fault I was going to try this anyway.
So I made a thick paste of barkeepers friend and applied. Waited 20 minutes and then vacuumed off excess.
I used a wet vac and a small paint brush to apply water and sucked it up immediately. I did this several times to each spot.
This removed the stain.

So my question is… What if I don’t use baking soda to neutralize?

Also, naval jelly does not have oxalic acid per their tech team.

If I had it to do over again I would use a child’s medicine syringe to carefully apply a thick glob of naval jelly and leave on 10 minutes and then suck it off with vac and then light rinse with water. After letting sit overnight I would then rinse several times with water and vac it up.
Here is the before and after when I did just the naval jelly.

After naval

Can I get away with just rinsing with water a second time as described above?

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Canofworms

93 posts in 246 days


#10 posted 06-24-2014 11:22 PM

Finisherman,
What if I don’t neutralize the naval jelly or the barkeepers friend?
When I did the baking soda paste it brought the stain back with a vengeance?
Can I just repeatedly saturate with water and vacuuming up?


Oxalic acid will likely work. You can buy it in crystaline form as wood bleach at a store that sells professional finishing supplies. You mix the oxalic acid crystals with hot water until you have a saturated solution, meaning that no more crystals will dissolve into the hot water. Just brush the solution onto the surface and let it dry. If the stains aren t entirely gone, repeat the process as necessary. After the stains are gone, neutralize the surface with a solution of baking soda and water, as you ve been doing. I m a little bit surprised that the naval jelly is removing the black stains as well as the rust, unless of course, the naval jelly contains oxalic, as well as phosphoric acid. If it works, it works. As others have said, barkeeper s friend contains oxalic acid, as does Dutch boy cleanser. I d apply either of those with just enough water to make a thin paste and then wait and neutralize as described above.

- Finisherman


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gfadvm

11478 posts in 1434 days


#11 posted 06-25-2014 12:35 AM

I personally really like the nail stains! They add character and aren’t the least bit offensive to me. I’d leave em.

People pay extra for wood with character like yours!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Canofworms

93 posts in 246 days


#12 posted 06-25-2014 12:37 AM

Thank you.
I realize that, but I don’t like them.
Unless you want to buy this reclaimed white oak 2” planks for $15 a foot?

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gfadvm

11478 posts in 1434 days


#13 posted 06-25-2014 01:00 AM

Different strokes for different folks.

That’s why they make Fords and Chevys, blondes, brunettes…...........

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Finisherman

210 posts in 593 days


#14 posted 06-25-2014 04:21 PM

You can try applying your finish without neutralizing the acid, but you risk having your finish fail sooner or later. If you can’t use the baking soda, I suggest that you substitute several applications of distilled water. I suspect that the minerals in your city water, rather than the baking soda, might be the culprit. Try mixing the baking soda with distilled water, rather than with tap water. Also, you don’t need to use the baking soda as a paste. Just dissolve several teaspoons into a quart of water. Best of luck.

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Canofworms

93 posts in 246 days


#15 posted 06-25-2014 07:02 PM

I will try several applications of distilled water and the shop vac.

Is the barkeepers friend a good option for lightening the entire area?
When I stand back the area looks blotchy.
These blotches are from the pet stains and from the very light areas where I used the Barkeepers friend.

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