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dado nailing blowout

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Forum topic by woodworkingdrew posted 06-19-2014 05:30 AM 1275 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1073 days


06-19-2014 05:30 AM

I really like using the dado joint, I find it simplistic and effective. After I glue the joint I tack it with a 15ga pneumatic nailer, and its blowing the nails out into the shelf. Are the nails to long or is the gauge of the nail to big? I am using 2 1/4 nails. Thanks!

-- Andrew, California


14 replies so far

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TCCcabinetmaker

930 posts in 1819 days


#1 posted 06-19-2014 06:28 AM

well, some missing info in your question, but if the thickness of whatever you are joining together is less than 2 1/4 then yes, the nails are too long. Also, find a high quality glue that you like, and reduce the gauge of the fasteners you are using, that is unless it’s 4×4s, then increase your gauge…

Oh well I can’t really give ya a helpful answer based on provided info, tried just the same.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

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woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1073 days


#2 posted 06-19-2014 04:31 PM

Tcc- sorry for leaving that detail out. I was referencing 3/4 vaneer plywood

-- Andrew, California

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pintodeluxe

4855 posts in 2277 days


#3 posted 06-19-2014 04:40 PM

3/4” plywood, and I’m guessing 1/4” deep dados? So 1-1/4 or 1-1/2” nails would be sufficient to hold it together until the glue dries. Shorter nails are easier to prevent blowouts.
Since you are gluing the joints, you might consider switching to an 18 gauge brad nailer. I have enjoyed working with my Bostitch 18 gauge nailer much more than the 15 of 16 gauge variety.

Good luck with it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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woodchuckerNJ

1154 posts in 1098 days


#4 posted 06-19-2014 04:53 PM

Try turning your nailer 90 degrees. The nail seems like it is finding it’s own way.
Turning it 90 will often eliminate it.

I try not to use nails for those joints. I do use nails for utility grade or jigs.

-- Jeff NJ

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RockyTopScott

1184 posts in 2943 days


#5 posted 06-19-2014 04:54 PM

I agree with Pinto..I use 18 gauge when I do that technique

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

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NoThanks

798 posts in 993 days


#6 posted 06-19-2014 06:34 PM

The nails have a chisel point. So the nail is going to curve. Like woodchuck says, turn the gun 90 deg. so that when the nail curves it stays in the wood instead of turning out the side. (1 1/2” is plenty)

PS: I exaggerated the curve for the example!

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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Loren

8304 posts in 3112 days


#7 posted 06-19-2014 07:58 PM

I use 1.25” nails for that with a 15 ga. nailer. Blowout is something
you’ll get better at controlling but it never will stop being
aggravating.

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Redoak49

1951 posts in 1453 days


#8 posted 06-19-2014 09:14 PM

This is all interesting. I have used my nail guns in a variety of materials. I only have had problems with the nail bending with my pin nailer or very hard wood where it follows the grain on the 18 gauge nails. I have never had the problem with plywood. I think that a 15 gauge or even 16 gauge nail is way too much for this joint. I would use an 18 gauge nail 1-14” long. I think that he should make certain that he is nailing from the middle of the dado. I typically will make a very light line on the outside to mark the center of the dado. In addition, make certain that the nailer is perpendicular to the wood.

A 15 gauge nailer is much bigger than the 18 gauge and is a little more difficult to accurately place and hold than the 18 gauge nailer.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2102 days


#9 posted 06-19-2014 09:24 PM

15 gauge should be 3 x the cross-sectional area of 18 gauge. So, it should be stiffer, but it’s also displacing more wood, so the forces are higher and maybe that increases the chance of following the grain.

In any thing remotely furniture-like, I would drill pilot holes and use screws instead of nails.

-Paul

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teejk

1215 posts in 2149 days


#10 posted 06-19-2014 09:45 PM

I never use my 15ga nailer on fine work. Nail-guns obey physics…path of least resistance in this case so blowout is a function of that long nail I think. My 16ga works fine, I have more options on nail length and for some reason that slightly slimmer nail can follow a straight line better.

View woodworkingdrew's profile

woodworkingdrew

189 posts in 1073 days


#11 posted 06-19-2014 09:57 PM

If I go the pilot hole, screw route how can I cover up the screw head?

-- Andrew, California

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2102 days


#12 posted 06-19-2014 10:04 PM

How were you covering the nail heads? Is this a painted project? Were you using putty and paint?

For screws, you counterbore the hole and use a plug to cover the screw-head. A variety of plugs are available even at Home Depot. Flathead plugs can be sanded flush. Crowned or mushroom plugs can be left as-is.

I’m not an expert on this. I’ve built exactly one book-case with plugs over screws. I’d better step aside and wait for somebody who knows what he’s talking about!

-Paul

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1184 posts in 2943 days


#13 posted 06-19-2014 10:55 PM

If you have a dado, glue and clamps should be sufficient.

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

150 posts in 933 days


#14 posted 06-20-2014 06:30 AM

I use 18ga narrow crown staples if looks don’t matter or if it will be hidden or filled and painted. I have an 18ga brad nailer and a 16ga finish nailer as well and neither of them get much use. The finish nailer is really only good for … finish work like installing moulding in a house.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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