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Tenoning Jig - which to buy

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Forum topic by Crickett posted 06-17-2014 04:45 PM 1672 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Crickett

117 posts in 946 days


06-17-2014 04:45 PM

I’m very eager to buy a tenoning jig as it’s impossible to get clean cuts from a stack dado. Most units appear to look the same at first glance. I know Delta made a killer one in the early 90’s and it weighed quite a bit but you can’t find them anymore. While I’m not a huge Griz fan in general, they appear to look similar to many of the others with basic features. I’d like one with a micro-adjust and I’ve only come across the jet that has this. Please offer some advice or user experiences. Does anyone have one they’re looking to sell?? Thanks ~ Crickett


28 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#1 posted 06-17-2014 04:59 PM

If I didn’t have one of those old heavy Delta ones, I would
make one from the plan on Woodgears.

https://woodgears.ca/tenon/jig.html

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Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#2 posted 06-17-2014 05:01 PM

I used one of these for a few years. I’m not sure what
happened to it. Jig rides on the fence. I used it to cut
tenons and saddle joints.

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Hammerthumb

2533 posts in 1441 days


#3 posted 06-17-2014 05:01 PM

I have the Jet model and really like the fine adjustment on it. Works very well.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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Crickett

117 posts in 946 days


#4 posted 06-17-2014 05:03 PM

I really want to stick to the cast iron ones for their shear mass and controllabilty. Even the most experienced of woodworkers get kickback back using wooden tenoning jigs. Just ask Paul Sellers…...

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jmartel

6575 posts in 1616 days


#5 posted 06-17-2014 05:05 PM

I built the woodgears tenon jig. There’s really no way of getting kickback with it.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2316 days


#6 posted 06-17-2014 05:06 PM

I think this one is essentially a copy of the Delta, http://woodworker.com/tenoning-jig-mssu-116-738.asp?search=tenon jig&searchmode=2 I got it several years ago and have no complaints, it’s wicked heavy and works well, you can register for a pro account and get it for a bit less & with the $5 shipping special it’s a good deal for the $$$

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Lumberpunk's profile

Lumberpunk

323 posts in 1803 days


#7 posted 06-17-2014 05:08 PM

I just picked up a Delta off of craigslist this weekend for $50 in good condition. Shop around second hand world (kjiji, ebay?) you will find one eventually. (I had choice from 3)

-- If someone tells you you have enough tools and don't need any more, stop talking to them, you don't need that kind of negativity in your life.

View Crickett's profile

Crickett

117 posts in 946 days


#8 posted 06-17-2014 05:13 PM

Since my mortising machine is a Jet, maybe I should keep it in the family. Are there any other options with micro-adjust other than Jet. With the wooden jigs, you don’t have the heft and can lead to lifting if you don’t have a washer running inside the t-style miter track or kickback – plenty of vids online showing this and how scary it is. Anytime my blade is more than 2” above my table, I will take every precaution I can.

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jmartel

6575 posts in 1616 days


#9 posted 06-17-2014 05:23 PM

If you keep your miter slots waxed, the jigs will not lift.

Also, if your slots have the t-style track, you probably won’t be able to use the cast iron jigs anyway.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Crickett's profile

Crickett

117 posts in 946 days


#10 posted 06-17-2014 05:35 PM

I didn’t say “t-track,” I said “t-style” as in the type of miter slots I have in my cabinet saw. See the slot pictured here. And keeping you slots waxed would lower the friction leading to easier lift. At any rate, we’re getting off topic here. Does anyone have experience with different cast iron jigs than can lend some first hand experience?

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GregD

783 posts in 2602 days


#11 posted 06-17-2014 06:03 PM

I have the tenoning jig that Rockler sells.

The challenge for tenons is getting the precise thickness that you need. The advantage of the woodgears jig is that it references 1 side of the work for both cheek cuts and so is not affected by the thickness of the work. I found that after only 1 week my thicknessed parts were no longer of precisely uniform thickness and I had to fine tune the thickness of each tenon individually. Granted that was framing lumber, but it had been sitting around for a while.

I made a jig for a dial indicator so I could set the tenoning jig to take off a specific amount of waste from the tenon.

-- Greg D.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2316 days


#12 posted 06-17-2014 06:09 PM

The Woodtek micro adjusts, looking at images of both, WoodTek,

Versus the Jet,

they appear to have the same control features but the clamping structure of the WoodTek has a much better design IMO

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2533 days


#13 posted 06-17-2014 07:49 PM

I’d say make your own. I made one with a few clamps some mdf and glue. Since you make the mortise first and only need to trim each side of the tenon till it fits, you just need an adjustment mechanism. I came up with one using a re-purposed clamp and a dial indicator and magnetic stop in a scrap of wood. I can easily adjust the fence by the thou.

You mentioned the dado blades not leaving a good cut. I bought an 8” blade that was 1/4” thick with a flat top so it gives me super smooth cuts. Love it. you could cut with just a plain blade though. Anyway here are some pic’s and a link to the blade.

https://flic.kr/s/aHsjHkqqeC

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2003715/284/Bessey-Single-Screw-Edge-Clamp.aspx

http://www.infinitytools.com/8-Flat-Top-Blade-24T-5_8-Arbor-250-Kerf/productinfo/080-250/

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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Crickett

117 posts in 946 days


#14 posted 06-17-2014 08:05 PM

ChefHDAN – I’m not familiar with Woodtek but I’ll say it looks like a sweet unit. For $100 seems like a no-brainer to me, and if it’s equivalent to the Jet than I’m a happy camper. Thanks for the tip – much appreciated.

View Sawdust4Blood's profile

Sawdust4Blood

392 posts in 2488 days


#15 posted 06-17-2014 08:52 PM

I’ve had the Rockler tenoning jig for about 4 years now. It’s always done right by me but it was also $40 cheaper back then. I’ve built fence riding jigs but the fine adjust screw on this jig allows tuning the tenon thickness much easier than tweaking the fence would ever be. Of course the other option would to keep making them with your stacked dado and get a good shoulder plane to tune them. I’m happy with the tenoning jig that I have but it’s pretty much a one trick pony. Not sure I would make the same choice if I had to pay over $100 for it.

-- Greg, Severn MD

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