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Forum topic by JIM COLLINS posted 06-17-2014 12:22 PM 903 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JIM COLLINS

33 posts in 2399 days


06-17-2014 12:22 PM

I am in the process of making some picture frames. I made a sled to make the 45 degree cuts, and they are fairly nice but not perfect. I read somewhere about putting a blade tensioner on my table saw, but can’t seem to find what I need to take the wobble out of the blade. does anyone know of this?

-- Jim in the U.P. nothing like the smell of fresh cut wood


8 replies so far

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ChefHDAN

858 posts in 2422 days


#1 posted 06-17-2014 12:51 PM

Do you mean a stabilizer? Like these? http://www.amazon.com/Freud-SC-001-2-Inch-Stabilizer-8-Inch/dp/B0000223O3 I don’t have an opinion on them, if I was not getting the correct results I would first go back to the tune of my saw and confirm, blade alignment, and then go to the jig and be sure I didn’t get out of alignment with my sled, then I would look at the blade and arbor, but I’ve never run into a situation where I’ve needed to consider a blade stabilizer. What is your set up for saw & blade, that info might help some of the more experienced LJ’s to give you a better answer than mine.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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JIM COLLINS

33 posts in 2399 days


#2 posted 06-17-2014 03:55 PM

Thank you. It could be the jig too. I know by looking at it that there is a wobble in the blade not a lot but they just don’t quite line up perfectly. I always have one that has a small crack in it. I was planning on making a new jig. maybe I should do that first. I have put a big square on it and according to that it’s a perfect 45, just don’t line up that way when I try to put the pieces together.

-- Jim in the U.P. nothing like the smell of fresh cut wood

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Dallas

3599 posts in 2059 days


#3 posted 06-17-2014 03:59 PM

Depending who made your big square and the quality, it may not be all that accurate.

I bought architect/engineering triangles at an office supply. Since then it has been a lot easier to get accurate cuts.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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nicksmurf111

366 posts in 1023 days


#4 posted 06-17-2014 05:07 PM

Try a different blade. If the wobble doesn’t go away, then check the arbor. Is it direct drive or belt drive? If there is a spec of rust on the arbor then you might be able to just knock it off. Any detectable blade wobble is bad. Please tell us what saw and blade you are using.

-- Nicholas

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JIM COLLINS

33 posts in 2399 days


#5 posted 06-17-2014 05:34 PM

I am using an old Craftsman table saw series 113 298033 I have used different blades, but right now I have a Bosch finishing blade on 60 tooth 10 inch table saw. I am rather new to this, but looking at the 45 degree cuts along side each other, it seems one leans one way or the other. is that wobble? It is belt drive

-- Jim in the U.P. nothing like the smell of fresh cut wood

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JIM COLLINS

33 posts in 2399 days


#6 posted 06-17-2014 05:34 PM

It is belt drive

-- Jim in the U.P. nothing like the smell of fresh cut wood

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nicksmurf111

366 posts in 1023 days


#7 posted 06-17-2014 06:16 PM

Is it a thin kerf blade or a full kerf blade? I don’t have any experience with thin kerf blades on table saws. I’m sure others here have. But, I doubt the blade can be deflecting.

The wobble could cause your all your angles to be set incorrectly, but only by the amount of wobble you have. If you can see the wobble with your eyes when you hold something next to the blade and turn it, then it’s way too much. Hold a piece of wood up just slightly enough to touch the side of the teeth, and turn the belt by hand, if you hear a zing-zing-zing only half-way around, then it is wobbling. I had a bad blade on my saw. After I figured out the blade was bad, I marked it as such and discarded it.

I assume you already adjusted the trunnions on your saw, and also made sure that the blade was perpendicular to the miter slot? You will need to do both after fixing the wobble. After that, then re-adjust your jig. If your unfamiliar with the process let us know, there are lots of links online.

If the blade is actually wobbling, take the belt off and check for loose or dirty bearings. If they are smooth, clean the arbor with a bronze brush and/or steel wool. If it doesn’t improve, then remove the arbor and have the surface machined on a metal lathe (always replace the bearings once you disassemble). Since you don’t have a direct drive saw, it should be straight forward to repair. That saw is very common, and you shouldn’t have any issues tuning it up.

-- Nicholas

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JIM COLLINS

33 posts in 2399 days


#8 posted 06-17-2014 06:37 PM

Thank you Nicholas, I will try those things.

-- Jim in the U.P. nothing like the smell of fresh cut wood

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