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Grain Direction in Marquetry ??

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Forum topic by Bigkahunaranch posted 06-16-2014 07:53 PM 911 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bigkahunaranch

122 posts in 972 days


06-16-2014 07:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: veneer marquetry grain

Ok0 So I am very new to marquetry. I have learned a lot reading the blogs here and Boatwright has been great answering questions.

My first project is a three color palm tree, like the picture.
And I am going with the packet method and cut on a scrollsaw.
My question concerns the leaves. There are five of them, and they fan out.
So in order to get the grain to match the leaves, would I uses five different pieces of green veneer?
If so that would be five green, one brown for the coconuts and one tan for the trunk of the tree.

Now what if I wanted to segment each leaf to have the grain opposed on each one?
Would I use ten pieces of green veneer?

Thanks
Dave

-- To see samples of my work, please visit https://www.facebook.com/bigkahunaranch


4 replies so far

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jmartel

6570 posts in 1614 days


#1 posted 06-16-2014 08:17 PM

I would do each leaf in 2 pieces, having the grain maybe 45 deg different to each other (22.5 degrees off of the centerline for each)

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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shipwright

7170 posts in 2262 days


#2 posted 06-16-2014 10:56 PM

If you want to do Boulle style just make one layer in the green and accept the grain as it comes. The grain in most dyed veneer is quite plain and it should cause little problem. If you want to orient the grain in each piece you would be better of with either double bevel or piece by piece (classic) style.
My advice, since you are starting out would be to go with Boulle style and focus on the menial stuff like assembling the packet properly and following the lines as perfectly as you can.
If you want to give the leaves definition, you can cut in Boulle style, cutting each leaf in two pieces and then use sand shading along the spine to simulate three dimensions. This will be more dramatic than grain orientation in a dyed veneer with little character.

Good luck and keep us posted.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Bigkahunaranch

122 posts in 972 days


#3 posted 06-17-2014 10:05 PM

Thanks folks for the replies.

So I tried the Boulle style. My packet was Koa for the trunk, Dyed Green for the leaves, Aformosa for the coconuts, Birdseye Maple for the sand which I drew in, and plain cut Maple for the backgound.

The Bad:
I forgot to number the pieces ( I knew better).
Some of the leaf tips split at the ends ( should have taped them up-again I knew better)
I had lots of gaps on several pieces ( I checked my table to blade and it was at 90 degrees)
Worst of all, walked by a window with the tray holding the pieces and a good Texas breeze disoriented everything.

The Good: I learned alot.

After assembling what I could I gave myself a “D” grade.
But I know it will get better with practice.

-- To see samples of my work, please visit https://www.facebook.com/bigkahunaranch

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shipwright

7170 posts in 2262 days


#4 posted 06-17-2014 11:15 PM

When you do Boulle style, make sure that you don’t crowd the pieces tightly together when you assemble. The cutting style means that there are kerf gaps and you can’t make them go away. If, however, you disperse them evenly they are almost invisible. There is a strong tendency to try to get tight fits as you start assembling but you will only end up with bigger gaps in other places. (Don’t ask how I discovered this.)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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