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Shoulder plane or other means?

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Forum topic by BubingaBill posted 06-16-2014 06:48 PM 1527 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BubingaBill

290 posts in 1146 days


06-16-2014 06:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question walnut tablesaw plane

Hi all!
I’m in the finishing stages of a box I’m making and I have encountered a small problem. I have a walnut case with a strip of walnut (1/4” x 1/4”) just inside the edges of the lid and base. Flush with the opening. This is just to thicken the sides and give the edges of the opening a look of strength. I decided to give the lid a small gap to add a “gasket” to this case and found 1/8” x 1/8” leather from the leather shop works very well.
I cut a small channel out of the strips on my table saw and it appeared to work well but when I dry fit the strips and tried to close the lid I found the leather strips were sitting too high.
Now I need to make the small grove a 16th or less deeper and I’m afraid to try and recut something so small.
The strips are 2 of each 36” long by 1/4” x 1/4” and 6” long by 1/4” x 1/4”.

Any ideas would be great!!

Thanks!
Bill

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!


17 replies so far

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Richard H

489 posts in 1142 days


#1 posted 06-16-2014 06:59 PM

A shoulder plane would be a fast and easy way to do this. If I understand the location of the channel correctly a router plane would also work as long as you keep pressure on the reference board. If you are careful and go slow you could also scribe a line with a marking gauge and par to it with a chisel. Shoulder and router planes really are connivence tools and good chisel technique can do everything they can do.

I would probably use a light pass with the chisel flat on the grove to clean up any glue anyways as I don’t like to expose my plane irons to glue in any form.

Hope this helps

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BubingaBill

290 posts in 1146 days


#2 posted 06-16-2014 07:30 PM

Richard,
Suggestions on where I could find a cheap one? WoodCraft want 150 and that’s too much. I don’t have that right now.
Thanks

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

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knockknock

337 posts in 1634 days


#3 posted 06-16-2014 09:35 PM

To clarify, do you have:

1) A 1/8” groove in the 1/4” strip, that you want to make deeper

or

2) A 1/8” rabbet in the 1/4” strip, that you want to make wider/deeper

———-

A small shoulder or rabbet plane would work for the rabbet, but I don’t know of a shoulder plane small enough for a 1/8” groove.

If it is a groove, a router plane with a 1/8” inch blade (if your groove is 1/8”+ wide) should work. A 1/8”- chisel should also work, you will have to be careful (there is a Paul Sellers video on how to make a router plane with a chisel by just drilling a hole in a piece of wood).

To hold the strips when working on them. Make a matching (to the strip size) 1/4” groove in a board to stick them in ( a sticking board), with a stop on one end.

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Richard H

489 posts in 1142 days


#4 posted 06-16-2014 09:43 PM

It just occurred to me you said box. Is the box glued up? If so shoulder planes won’t work on the inside face because you have to drive the plane onto and off the work piece to get full registration. In that case a chisel or possibility a router plane are going to be your only choice.

I got a antique shoulder plane used from Ed Lebetkin’s store in Pittsburgh NC but I will say even antique they are not terribly cheap. I also have a slightly larger Lie-Neilsen one which is lovely but much more expensive. I remember seeing some cheap ones on Garrett Wade but I have no experience with them so can’t really comment on how usable they may or may not be. A small wooden rabbet plane might also be a answer and probably a lot cheaper to find used ($10-$20 at flea markets maybe a bit more on Ebay). I have a 1/2” skewed iron one that can get into pretty tight spots.

if you don’t have a shoulder plane or router plane you might want to give scribing a line with a marking gauge and chiseling to it a try on a scrap to see how it goes. It’s not as hard as it sounds if you make a good scribe line to register your chisel in and just go slow. Take light passes and use the part you already completed as a reference for the rest.

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BubingaBill

290 posts in 1146 days


#5 posted 06-16-2014 10:04 PM

The strips are not glued in yet. The box is made. These strips fit inside the opening of the bottom with mitered corners. As far as the strips go I have removed the outside top corner 1/8” wide by about a 16th of an inch deep. I now need to make this a “hair” deeper until I can close the lid with these in place. Harbor freight has a super cheap set of mini planes and one appears to be a shoulder plane. I’m going to swing by there on my way home from work and see if they might work.

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

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Tim

3112 posts in 1422 days


#6 posted 06-17-2014 12:04 AM

1/8” in on a corner? Doesn’t sound like there’s much room to register the plane to keep it flat. I’d pare carefully with a chisel and a guide block, or make a quick router plane if you really didn’t want to risk messing it up.

My guess is the HF plane is not going to work well for you, but it’s possible. But you cut this the first time on the table saw right, couldn’t you test with scrap until you got the right setting?

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BubingaBill

290 posts in 1146 days


#7 posted 06-17-2014 12:41 AM

I was ok with using the tablesaw when the piece was a quarter inch wide but holding it upside down now to cut this a hair deeper is going to be risky with it now only 1/8” wide.

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

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BubingaBill

290 posts in 1146 days


#8 posted 06-17-2014 12:44 AM

All i can do is set the plane to only shave the wood and hope for the best. I only need 1/16” to make this work. I will post some pics so you can see what Im dealing with.

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

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donj9

5 posts in 901 days


#9 posted 06-17-2014 01:18 AM

Get some thinner leather or have a leather worker skive yours down to a thickness that works.

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knockknock

337 posts in 1634 days


#10 posted 06-17-2014 02:40 AM

Maybe this picture of a sticking board will help (excuse the photography). I put a rabbet in a piece of pine, put a small screw at the end of the rabbet for a stop. Then using my small shoulder plane made a rabbet in a 1/4” piece of poplar. Or you could use double sided sticky tape to hold your piece down.

ps. This was a good opportunity for me to get in some practice.

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Richard H

489 posts in 1142 days


#11 posted 06-17-2014 02:51 AM

Does this video help?

http://www.renaissancewoodworker.com/chiseling-a-rabbet/

Shannon is pretty good at explaining these kinds of techniques.

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knockknock

337 posts in 1634 days


#12 posted 06-17-2014 03:05 AM

Shannon (renaissance woodworker) is good, I have learned a lot from his videos.

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BubingaBill

290 posts in 1146 days


#13 posted 06-17-2014 03:29 AM

1/8” leather is the thinest they offer at an awesome leather shop near by.

The first pic Im holding the insert. The second shows the open case without the trim. The third shows a close up with the trim in place

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

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Richard H

489 posts in 1142 days


#14 posted 06-17-2014 04:21 AM

Looking at that part here is what comes to mind.

A small parts sled for a table saw or maybe something like the Grr-Riper push block

A sanding block that can register against the lip

A shoulder plane would work although you would want one of the smaller ones. A small 1/2” or so wooden rabbet plane would also work as it would let you register against the lip.

A router plane. Take two pieces and double stick tape them together with rabbets facing each other than use a router plane to cut down the height.

A chisel and marking gauge.

Can you just reduce the size of the back instead of the rabbet? If you can than a block plane would cut that down pretty quickly. Just count strokes to be consistent between all the pieces. The upside of that is you could leave the leather attached as you would be planning the back side of the piece.

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BubingaBill

290 posts in 1146 days


#15 posted 06-17-2014 05:13 PM

All great ideas. Thank you all for being so helpful!!
I did pick up a mini shoulder plane yesterday but didn’t get to mess with it last night. I have very limited experience with planes but I’m learning. I wish I could block plane the bottoms of these but then the top would be a different heights on either sides of the leather.
I’m going to give the should plane a try and see if it works for me. I will post pictures to show what I ended up with.

-- Measure twice and try not to cut your thumbs off!

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