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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 06-15-2014 03:07 PM 1179 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1750 days


06-15-2014 03:07 PM

I found a guy here in town who’s father owns a construction company. He’s versed in how to do a lot of stuff. So we’ve been bidding an working some jobs.
We have an opportunity to refinish some restaurant tables for a national chain.
They have birch veneer tables that someone refinished rather badly and the waterbased poly is coming off like a sunburn. Peeling right off.
We have a finishing battle plan and are about to quote this job next week, but I’m having trouble finding out how much these tables would cost them if they bought new.
Most of the online places to buy restaurant tables are really cheap with the most expensive I’ve found at around $250.00

Can anyone tell me where a national chain would buy their tables and how much a new table top would cost them?

I don’t want to bid this job too high or they might just buy new.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


11 replies so far

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2581 posts in 2425 days


#1 posted 06-15-2014 06:10 PM

A national chain will buy wherever they can get the best price. There are a number of manufacturers that cater to restaurants and lounges. Are the $250 prices for the top only or top and base? We had to get prices for the separate components as there are a wide range of bases and tops. I used to sell restaurant equipment and supplies for about five years. Tops can have a wide range of prices, depending on material- laminate, wood, plastic, metal. Personally, if it were me, I would buy new and take the amortization on my taxes, if the tops were still available. To me, sounds like the tops aren’t worth refinishing. BTW, are there any identifying marks or a name on the underside of the top? JMHO.

View huff's profile

huff

2828 posts in 2749 days


#2 posted 06-15-2014 06:59 PM

I don’t want to bid this job too high or they might just buy new.

Russell,

What are you basing your bid on; whether you can do the job and make a profit or whether you can underbid the job so they won’t buy new?

The price of a new table should have nothing to do with your bidding. It cost what it cost and they will have to decide whether they would keep what they have or order new ones.

Nothing is worse than trying to second guess what a customer might do and base your pricing on that. Wouldn’t you much rather lose the job, than under bid the job just to get it so you can work hard and lose money?

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

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InstantSiv

259 posts in 1059 days


#3 posted 06-15-2014 07:11 PM

I think knowing what a new table would cost is smart. Business people think in terms of $. He very well could price himself out of the job not knowing the cost of a new table. He can also better understand what kind of money he could be making or not making if he knew the cost of a new table.

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1750 days


#4 posted 06-15-2014 07:16 PM

Huff – From what we’ve heard from the commercial guys at Sherwin Williams, we can strip them with Stripease and use a trowel on finish. Couple coats should work. We might get the materials at cost too. May have to apply some stain after the Stripper if it discolors.
This restaurant isn’t going to get the new decor for about three years according to the manager and they really need to do something fast due to peeling poly.
My concern is that we don’t under bid or get so close to the new price that we lose the job. This might be the start of something big for us.

Right now I’m thinking that depending on the size of the table (average 30” x 48”) is $75.00 to $95.00 for the larger tables labor plus materials which will average out to about $10.00 to $20.00 per table. We’re looking at 56 tables.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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RussellAP

3059 posts in 1750 days


#5 posted 06-15-2014 07:23 PM

I’m going to call their corporate office and see if I can talk to a buyer about how much these tables are costing them. I may be able to replace the tops cheaper than refinish them. Then All I’d have to do is install them. I could then take the old tops and refinish them and sell them to someone else.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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huff

2828 posts in 2749 days


#6 posted 06-15-2014 07:33 PM

Pricing your jobs should be based on your material cost, labor cost, overhead and all other cost involved in doing the job.

My point I’m trying to make for Russell is; if you start basing your pricing on what the customer wants, than that’s a good way of pricing yourself out of business.

I’ve seen too many shops go out of business because they were so busy trying to underbid jobs to either beat their competitors, or trying to stay busy when it’s slow, or trying to offer a price they thought the customer would pay.

Under bidding and getting the job can be much more costly than pricing it correctly and not getting the job.

Nothing wrong with knowing what a new table will cost, but if you start letting that determine your price instead of dealing with the true cost of doing the job, than you will undoutably under bid the job and lose money in the end.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

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huff

2828 posts in 2749 days


#7 posted 06-15-2014 07:35 PM

Russell,

Now that’s a good idea; now you can give them both options and make a profit either way they decide to go.

They should appreciate that you are trying to save them money. They also realize you are a business and need to make a profit also.

Hope you make out.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View mporter's profile

mporter

253 posts in 2042 days


#8 posted 06-15-2014 07:37 PM

What chain is it? I would think a fancier sit down place would be willing to spend more money than a cheaper fast food place. You may concider that.

View ,'s profile

,

2387 posts in 3011 days


#9 posted 06-15-2014 09:39 PM

I think John makes the best points. Trying to adjust your bid to fit what you suspect a customer may want or will be able to afford is not a good deal. My thoughts are it is a production type job and I dont think you are set up that way. I believe most food businesses will go the most economical route which is not the ideal customer for a quality custom shop

-- .

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1507 posts in 2273 days


#10 posted 06-15-2014 09:51 PM

You could laminate them and t- mold the edges for an approx. cost of 34.00 bucks or you could make appropriate preparation and put glass on them for about 45.00 ea.

No one here can give you a suitable answer without more info.

And as stated, you can bet the owner well knows what a new table will cost.

Offer some options.

JB

View Don W's profile

Don W

17965 posts in 2031 days


#11 posted 06-16-2014 12:24 AM

I agree with Huff. The cost of the refinishing will not change no matter what the tables cost new. Bid the job to make your profit. Spend the time creating your estimate and don’t worry about new cost.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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