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Forum topic by Maximillian posted 06-15-2014 09:40 AM 974 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Maximillian

84 posts in 2746 days


06-15-2014 09:40 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question finishing sanding

Hi team
I am making a table top from “Flakeboard”, also known as “Strandboard”. It is a particle board made from large flakes. I know it is a bit of an unusual project but I really like to look of the board.
I have put the board through a commercial sanding machine, which has a done a good job of smoothing the surface. However, there are a myriad of ‘pits’ in the surface. Further sanding removes them but reveals others; far too many to patch with normal fillers.
Can anyone recommend a way of easily filling the entire surface. The pits are shallow and range from pin pricks to about 2mm in diameter. Given that the flakes are a mixture of colours, ranging from pine white through to hardwood red, the colour of the filler doesn’t matter so much.
I want to use a high gloss polyurethane or other product to eventually finish it. I thought of using Liquid Glass, but I think the potential for disaster is too great, given I have never used it before.
Thanks
Max

-- Max, New Zealand


11 replies so far

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2314 days


#1 posted 06-15-2014 11:49 AM

Famowood filler

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1533 posts in 1826 days


#2 posted 06-15-2014 12:23 PM

Bondo

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22021 posts in 1803 days


#3 posted 06-15-2014 12:43 PM

Pour on epoxy if you want to keep the look.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Loren's profile

Loren

8309 posts in 3112 days


#4 posted 06-15-2014 03:13 PM

Drywall mud goes on easy and is easy to sand flush. Many
fillers shrink as they dry so more than one application is
usually necessary.

If you want a real smooth, uniform surface, be diligent
about the filling and make sure you get it all filled.

I mostly use “rock hard” water putty these days which
can be mixed to a range of consistencies. It hardens
in about 30 minutes so one has to make it up in smaller
batches. It takes pigments that are water soluble…
like acrylic model paints or artists pigments.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1751 days


#5 posted 06-15-2014 03:28 PM

Monte, don’t pour on epoxy until the surface is completely sealed. It takes 8 hours for that stuff to harden and any seepage into the wood will mess up the flatness of the surface. It’ll turn out with ripples and look horrible.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3199 days


#6 posted 06-15-2014 03:49 PM

Why not a sheet of lexan over it?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Maximillian's profile

Maximillian

84 posts in 2746 days


#7 posted 06-15-2014 07:17 PM

Thanks for your many an varied responses.
Russell, what would you recommend I seal the surface with?
Monte, the only epoxy I know of is a glue. Are you referring to some kind of two-part clear finish? If so, I would appreciate your product recommendation.
Loren, can the water putty be ‘screeded’ or do I have to ‘patch’ as I am doing now. The problem with patching is that I cannot be guaranteed of filling every pit, only those that I notice

-- Max, New Zealand

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

3059 posts in 1751 days


#8 posted 06-15-2014 07:22 PM

That depends on what you will use after it is sealed. Shellac is a good all purpose sealer, but if you can use something thicker I would.
I’d ask Charles Niel about what chemical sealer to use, but Loren’s idea would likely be best on the surface you’re working with. You will need to sand the crap out of it after the mud. The only drawback to the drywall mud idea is that it may not come out even if you don’t sand it with a professional sander. If you can find a local mill that can sand the whole piece down in a machine, that would be better than a rotatory sander.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4032 posts in 1816 days


#9 posted 06-15-2014 08:10 PM

I’d wet sand it with thinned Danish oil wipe off and let dry. It might take a few times to level the surface as flake board has some large voids.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Maximillian's profile

Maximillian

84 posts in 2746 days


#10 posted 06-15-2014 08:16 PM

Hi Bondogaposis (nice name)
To clarify, are you suggesting using wet and dry sandpaper with Danish Oil? Is that as a sealer or the finish coat? I would like to use Danish oil, at least as an initial coat, as it imparts a nice lustre.
I find that I can get the surface near to perfect by sanding. However, further sanding starts tearing the flakes and becomes counterproductive.
I have looked online at how to apply epoxy finishes. They look very difficult to do and the potential for a monumental stuff up appears to be quite large.

-- Max, New Zealand

View Loren's profile

Loren

8309 posts in 3112 days


#11 posted 06-15-2014 10:02 PM

I haven’t messed with thinning the water putty, but it’s a lot
like plaster in that it just becomes soupy, which generally makes
it difficult to control. For your application it might work well
to do that. You can sift the powder through a fine screen
or flour sifter if you want a real smooth mixture.

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