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Newbie question: circular saw blade for ripping poplar

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Forum topic by shantsn posted 06-14-2014 05:00 PM 2492 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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shantsn

6 posts in 945 days


06-14-2014 05:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip

Hey everybody,

I’m getting ready to build a shelving unit using some 3/4 poplar but need to rip a few inches off each. I’m gonna be using my ridged 15amp circ saw, and went to HD to get SE advice on what type of blade to get. The guy I asked said to get the highest tooth count they had which ended up being a 140 tooth hollow ground blade for plywood and laminate. Now that I’m doing some more research I’m finding that a high tooth count can cause the wood to burn because of slower feed rates. I’d prefer to have the smoothest edge possible after making the cuts, but I definitely don’t want to burn the wood. What do you guys say, should I return this blade and get a 80 tooth or something in that range?

Thanks!


26 replies so far

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firefighterontheside

13500 posts in 1322 days


#1 posted 06-14-2014 05:06 PM

Are you talking about a 7 1/4” saw and you got a 140 tooth blade? Are you sure.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2325 days


#2 posted 06-14-2014 05:07 PM

If your going to be ripping the boards to width (parallel to the grain) then you need much lower tooth counts. My 10” tablesaw uses 24 TPI blade for ripping and does a very good job.

You will probably need to use a plane or a jointer to get the edge of the board smooth enough for finish work. Or you can use a sanding block and work your way from 80 grit to 220 grit sandpaper…

Good Luck!

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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firefighterontheside

13500 posts in 1322 days


#3 posted 06-14-2014 05:11 PM

Ok, there is such a thing,but it is not carbide. I would think you want to take that back and get something like a Freud Diablo 24 or 40 tooth blade.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#4 posted 06-14-2014 05:41 PM

A 7-1/4” 40 tooth would serve many purposes for you. Rip and crosscutting.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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shantsn

6 posts in 945 days


#5 posted 06-14-2014 05:51 PM

“Ok, there is such a thing,but it is not carbide. I would think you want to take that back and get something like a Freud Diablo 24 or 40 tooth blade.”
- firefighterontheside

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Avanti-Pro-7-1-4-in-x-140-Tooth-Plywood-Circular-Saw-Blade-P07140R/202035226

thats the exact blade that was recommended to me at HD. its for a 7 1/4 circular saw, and ill be ripping the boards so ill be sawing with with the grain not against it. when i look at blade descriptions all the “ultra finish” and “finish” blades have tooth counts ranging from 40-60. looks like ill be returning this one, am i better off with something like the link below?

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Avanti-7-1-4-in-x-60-Tooth-Fine-Finish-Circular-Saw-Blade-A0760R/202021695?N=5yc1vZc2jqZ1z0sjn9Z1z1313c#customer_reviews

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JonHitThingWithRock

97 posts in 1187 days


#6 posted 06-14-2014 06:01 PM

i’d go with a 40 tooth, it’ll do both ripping and crosscutting well enough. if you’re not averse to swapping blades all the time, you could get a 24 tooth for rips and a 60 tooth for crosscutting.

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nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2609 days


#7 posted 06-14-2014 06:03 PM

shantsn, there is a reason the people that work at a big box store work there and not in a cabinet shop or in the field. There are exceptions, but they are few and far between. In my experience, when you are ripping, as in, going with the grain, the fewer teeth the better. A circular saw doesn’t have that much power to push the teeth through the wood. The 60 tooth blade you provided the link to above may be a good blade, but it’s made for crosscutting. I will look online at HD and see if I can find something for you. I myself would not go over 24 teeth.

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

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nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2609 days


#8 posted 06-14-2014 06:10 PM

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shantsn

6 posts in 945 days


#9 posted 06-14-2014 06:10 PM

“shantsn, there is a reason the people that work at a big box store work there and not in a cabinet shop or in the field. There are exceptions, but they are few and far between. In my experience, when you are ripping, as in, going with the grain, the fewer teeth the better. A circular saw doesn t have that much power to push the teeth through the wood. The 60 tooth blade you provided the link to above may be a good blade, but it s made for crosscutting. I will look online at HD and see if I can find something for you. I myself would not go over 24 teeth. ”
- nailbanger2

Thanks for all the info guys. I’ve done some simple and rough woodworking in the past but this is the first time I’ve spent a good chunk of money on materials and want to make sure I have a nice finished product when done. So I appreciate you guys bearing with me while I come to the realization that even though a blade says ultra finish it doesn’t mean it’s gonna give me a smooth cut for the job I’m looking to do with it.

My main goal with this blade is the smoothed possible cut running parallel to the grain, the boards are 11 or 13’ long that I’ll be ripping. I also don’t mind purchasing a blade just for this project for this specific use of ripping, so I don’t want to compromise with a blade that will do ripping and cross cutting well, but would rather a blade that will be better at ripping.

So if I’m understanding you guys correctly, I should be looking for something in the 20-40 tooth range for ripping, and these blades won’t make rough cuts and leave splinters if I cut correctly?

Thanks again for all the info

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nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2609 days


#10 posted 06-14-2014 06:15 PM

11 or 13 feet long will be a challenge with a circ. saw. I stand by my choice, but would rather see you rip that with a table saw. If you need any pointers as to the proper procedure with a circ. saw, let us know.

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1742 days


#11 posted 06-14-2014 06:16 PM

The 60 tooth in your post #5 is suited for crosscutting.

You would be better off using one of these 2 Diablo blades. (I own both and perform well)

A 40 tooth is a combination blade. Can do both ripping and crosscutting
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Diablo-7-1-4-in-x-40-Tooth-Carbide-Circular-Saw-Blade-D0740R/100017783

A 24 tooth is a rip blade
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Diablo-7-1-4-in-x-24-Tooth-Carbide-Circular-Saw-Blade-D0724R/100008676

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2609 days


#12 posted 06-14-2014 06:21 PM

KDC68 – great minds think alike!

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

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shantsn

6 posts in 945 days


#13 posted 06-14-2014 06:21 PM

“11 or 13 feet long will be a challenge with a circ. saw. I stand by my choice, but would rather see you rip that with a table saw. If you need any pointers as to the proper procedure with a circ. saw, let us know. ”
- nailbanger2

I will be returning my blade and exchanging it for the 24 tooth diablo you guys recommended. Thanks again!

I figured using my circ saw isn’t the best option, but I don’t have a table saw and don’t have access to one either. I’m planning on using my saw horses with a sacrificial board underneath and will be making a jig to keep my cut straight along the whole board. I’m open to any and all tips you guys can give me!

Thanks

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nailbanger2

1041 posts in 2609 days


#14 posted 06-14-2014 06:30 PM

Make sure the boards won’t move on the horses. This is a problem with my plastic saw horses. Also, I imagine you will be using a straight edge to run the saw along, so make sure your boards are straight also. Unless you will be straightening both sides of the board (not a bad thing if you can).

I don’t want to get you depressed, shantsn, but if you do this perfectly, you will still have to clean up the edges.

http://www.woodsmithtips.com/2014/06/12/sanding-block-upgrade/?autostart=true&utm_source=WoodsmithTips&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=8308

This may help you.

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

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firefighterontheside

13500 posts in 1322 days


#15 posted 06-14-2014 06:36 PM

Good luck. The best way to have a smooth edge is to make sure the saw does not twist one way or the other as you cut. If it does it will leave circular marks on the edge as the back of the blade slides sideways into your edge. If you have very straight boards that you are ripping, you can use one as a guide as you cut the other. Make sure that you clamp them together well so that the weight of the saw doesn’t make the board you are cutting sag and then the saw base would go under the guide and mess up the cut.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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