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Will need to lift a 1800 lb CNC off of trailer???

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Forum topic by Jerry posted 41 days ago 879 views 0 times favorited 47 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jerry

2163 posts in 2144 days


41 days ago

I am having a CNC delivered on flat bed car hauler. It will be tarped. I have thought about renting a forklift. That is likely to be 500.00 +/-. My neighbor has a tractor with forks, it is a 35 hp and we have lifted a 1200 lb shaper with it, just thinking 1800 lbs is too much for the tractor. I am planning on letting the shipper back his trailer into my shop and have been looking at a 1 ton Gantry Crane at Northern Tool: http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200356724_200356724

I think I could lift at 4 corners with tow chains and let the shipper just drive out from underneath and then just simply lower the CNC down onto the floor. I am thinking for around 700.00 I can have the crane / hoist that would come in handy in my shop from time to time. But for 500 I would be renting a forklift for one day with nothing else to show for it.

But, a 2000 lb max limit on a crane lifting a 1800 lb CNC, not sure if that is just too risky. By the way, the CNC is 12’ 6” long.

In the next 8 months or so I intend on purchasing an older 50 hp ranch tractor with loader, but for now that does not help me.

I know Loren has been able to handle some of the heaviest of machines without much other than brains and muscle :)

Any advice.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net


47 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

510 posts in 83 days


#1 posted 41 days ago

I wouldn’t try a 1 ton crane.

-- "We build our workshops. Then we enjoy the fruits of our labor by laboring for more fruits." - Me

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TiggerWood

192 posts in 203 days


#2 posted 41 days ago

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

510 posts in 83 days


#3 posted 41 days ago

That’s kinda what I’m thinking.

[removed]

-- "We build our workshops. Then we enjoy the fruits of our labor by laboring for more fruits." - Me

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2163 posts in 2144 days


#4 posted 41 days ago

I love that pic. We use that method moving machinery a lot. This CNC has 4 legs so that would be difficult. I have thought about installing wheels under the legs and rolling it off the trailer. Really strong heavy duty wheels would not cost all that much. But the shipper might get impatient on my while I drill holes for bolting wheels onto the legs.

Here is a pic:

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View Loren's profile

Loren

7226 posts in 2245 days


#5 posted 41 days ago

Consider building a platform you can roll it onto.

I have considered this approach. The platform can be lowered
incrementally using jacks, wedges and jack stands.

That’s only 500lb to the corner. If you can bump it down
by 1/2” at a time I don’t see a lot of damage potential.

Of course it would be quicker to use a crane.

I broke a ramp made of 2×6s in half last month unloading
my Tannewitz JS using a pallet jack. If I had stuck cinder
blocks or wood bolsters underneath it would not have
broken. In any case, the machine is tough enough to take
the rapid descent. A CNC may not be.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2163 posts in 2144 days


#6 posted 41 days ago

The platform is also a decent idea. Got me thinking some.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

510 posts in 83 days


#7 posted 41 days ago

You might have to splurge for a piece of equipment here bud. The legs look stout but I wouldn’t trust setting one end down first after seeing it. Huge risk.

Maybe lift side by truck, put some rollers under those 2 legs. Build a support for the other end to hold the table right inside the legs. Lift the back end, set it on supports while the front legs are rolling, then lift the front and drive the trailer out.

How to get it inside I have no clue.

I’m of the opinion a forklift rental would be almost insurance against a catastrophe. Plus if it’s not facing the way you want it’s really gonna suck.

Looks like it has forklift sleeves. That’s a plus.

-- "We build our workshops. Then we enjoy the fruits of our labor by laboring for more fruits." - Me

View Iwud4u's profile

Iwud4u

270 posts in 126 days


#8 posted 41 days ago

I would get the forklift and do it right. There should be noted pick up points.
Last thing you want to do is tweak the frame. It will never be right if you do.
IDK what you paid for it, but if it costs another 500 to do it safely (and without damage) then I think it’s worth it.

-- It's far better to be criticized by a wise person than applauded by a fool --

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2163 posts in 2144 days


#9 posted 41 days ago

I am pondering this situation. The more I think about it, I agree with renting a machine is basically like paying for insurance against catastrophe. I think I can actually rent a bobcat with forks or a fork lift for around 300 so my 500 figure is probably a little high. And 300 is a small fee for safety.

Thanks a ton guys.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View Iwud4u's profile

Iwud4u

270 posts in 126 days


#10 posted 41 days ago

For what it’s worth, at least it’s a write off. ;)

-- It's far better to be criticized by a wise person than applauded by a fool --

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

1893 posts in 465 days


#11 posted 41 days ago

Your buddy has a tractor that can lift half.

Make some wheels that fit on the bottom of sleeves that will slip under/around the legs. Do two legs, lower, then lift the other side and slide the other wheels on. Use the tractor to slow/control the descent down the ramps. Let the driver leave, then place the machine within your shop, undoing the sleeved wheels in the same manner. Two legs, half lift at a time.

But then I just spent at least four hours of your time, not counting the cost of an adequate set of wheels/casters. Plus the time of your buddy, and his equipment… Plus the pucker factor.

Thinking it through, perhaps you’ve already come to the smartest decision. Rent the lift.

-- Bucket, any person that spends 10k on a bicycle is guaranteed to be a $@I almost started to like you. -bhog

View nicksmurf111's profile

nicksmurf111

111 posts in 47 days


#12 posted 41 days ago

I’ve hung cars by the rafters before accidentally. Missed an engine mount. Just an unsafe thought…

-- Nicholas

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2163 posts in 2144 days


#13 posted 41 days ago

Thanks guys, new I could count on my fellow LJ friends. Sometimes thinking out loud with friends online can help clear my mind. The CNC is going to be picked up and will be on it’s way soon so now is the time to get my end ready for unloading.

This has been quite the little adventure. But without a little adventure I would be just bored stiff :)

The auctioneer did not have a rigger prepared for buyers. They gave buyers 2 rigger contacts. One told me he quite that job and hung up. The other hung up on me twice. Yes, he actually hung up on me twice… The first time he hung up on me, I figured it was probably him being busy and maybe more unintentional. The second time I figured he is just disrespectful and lacks common business character.

I was able to contact the previous owner’s wife, the owner recently passed away, hence the auction. The wife was actually able to get me in with a good person to load for us. In the meantime I had 2 decent shipper quotes ready and just waiting on me to hire.

Now it is finally coming together. But now I must figure out my end of it all. But a 300.00 lift sounds like a real winner.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View freddy1962's profile

freddy1962

553 posts in 146 days


#14 posted 41 days ago

Rent the forklift. Go on owwm.org. Post the pic of the machine. Their are probably 50 guys on there that have moved similar or larger sized machines. They are extremely skilled at this sort of thing and helpful. Rigging and pick points are very important if that’s the way you go. Certainly don’t roll it on a “built” platform. I’ve done all my machines with my tractor, the heaviest being 1000lbs. This is a bit larger and costly. Think it out.

-- JEFF Illinois (Banks of the Mississippi)

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1155 posts in 893 days


#15 posted 40 days ago

Just be careful. If you have to extend the arms of the forklift way out far to clear the trailer you may have an issue with weight and balance. You don’t want to be liable for damage to the forklift or hurting someone. Interested to see the solution.

” But the shipper might get impatient on my while I drill holes for bolting wheels onto the legs” – you could get car skates and just jack up each corner and slip one in.

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