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Eight Inch Joiner Fever!

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Forum topic by MT_Stringer posted 06-10-2014 04:20 AM 955 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


06-10-2014 04:20 AM

Topic tags/keywords: poplar

Today, for the first time, I wished I had an eight inch joiner instead of a six. Several of the 4/4 rough poplar boards I had bought to build cabinet face frames were 6 inches or wider. :-(

I guess I will just have to get over it because I really don’t have the room for an eight incher. Sure would be nice though.

To get around the 6 inch limitation, I jointed a smooth edge on the wide pieces, then ripped a 3 1/4 inch piece out of a couple and a two inch wide piece from another two pieces. One board was just a little wider than the cutter head so I used a hand plane to smooth it out.

Still, an 8 incher would be nice. Hey, a guy can dream, can’t he? :-)
Oh well. Onward and upward.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas


14 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#1 posted 06-10-2014 04:31 AM

You can flip a wide board around and, using the rabbeting
ledge for support, surface up to 12” on a 6” jointer. It
will tend to be a little off and require some work with
hand planes to get the face flat enough to feed through
a planer and get a suitable board for cabinetmaking. Twist
is really the most important thing to get out of hardwoods
over 3/4” thick. The planer won’t push a cupped oak
board flat the way it will on pine, so the important thing
is to joint the surface opposite the planer cutterhead
so it rides free of twist. The planer will make the other
side pretty flat, then flip the board and plane the jointed
side. From there, assess and correct problems after
letting the board move overnight with a hand plane and
the planer.

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#2 posted 06-10-2014 04:50 AM

Thanks Loren. I do have a planer sled that I have used in the past. For example, say the leftover portion is an inch or so that didn’t get jointed. I place the jointed portion of the board face down on the sled and let the rough portion stick over the side of the sled. After planing the side smooth, I flip it over and run it through the planer to remove the portion that had not been jointed.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 952 days


#3 posted 06-10-2014 04:52 AM

The only problem I see is that you are drinking a diet drink that doesn’t have great taste and 28 flavors.

#DietDrPepperTastesMoreLikeRegularDrPepper

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#4 posted 06-10-2014 04:59 AM

Heh heh, I hit the DP ever so often. :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View jonah's profile

jonah

687 posts in 2764 days


#5 posted 06-10-2014 10:48 AM

If you’re making face frames, doesn’t that mean lots of narrow pieces anyway? Why not just rip each board to < 6 inches and then joint them separately?

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#6 posted 06-10-2014 12:50 PM

Some parts are 3 inches. Others are 2, and some are 1 1/2. I want to use as much as possible from each board. It’ll work.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View bowedcurly's profile

bowedcurly

515 posts in 1195 days


#7 posted 06-10-2014 01:01 PM

sounds good to me, Ihit tha Pepper to once inawhile

-- Staining killed the wood<<<<<>>>>>Dyeing gave it life

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5607 posts in 2698 days


#8 posted 06-10-2014 01:08 PM

FWIW, I ran smack into the jointer width problem myself last night. Much of my stock is 8+ ” wide. So even an 8” jointer would be too narrow… Solved it straight away with a planer jointing sled. It’s a bit ackward starting stock through the planer, but it works well enough I almost, but not quite, wonder why I bother with a jointer…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View johnhutchinson's profile

johnhutchinson

1196 posts in 1095 days


#9 posted 06-10-2014 01:35 PM

Just like you, I often wake up in the morning wishing I had an eight-incher instead of a six.

-- John - Central Ohio - "too much is never enough"

View smitdog's profile

smitdog

229 posts in 1571 days


#10 posted 06-10-2014 02:09 PM

Bwahahah! John, I just about spit out my coffee! I find morning the best time to judge if the size of your jointer is adequate…

-- Jarrett - Mount Vernon, Ohio

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johnhutchinson

1196 posts in 1095 days


#11 posted 06-10-2014 02:59 PM

Sorry about that, but how can I read …

“Still, an 8 incher would be nice. Hey, a guy can dream, can’t he?
Oh well. Onward and upward.”

... and keep a straight face.

No points for that one. Too easy. :)

-- John - Central Ohio - "too much is never enough"

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#12 posted 06-10-2014 03:16 PM

Yep, that was a good one.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Mike Throckmorton's profile

Mike Throckmorton

124 posts in 1131 days


#13 posted 06-10-2014 03:48 PM

This is where some degenerate chimes in with the whole is it important whether it’s helical or straight issue.

-- You are never complete, you just draw a line where done is and stop at that line.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#14 posted 06-10-2014 04:13 PM

“FWIW, I ran smack into the jointer width problem myself last night. Much of my stock is 8+ ” wide. So even an 8” jointer would be too narrow… Solved it straight away with a planer jointing sled. It’s a bit ackward starting stock through the planer, but it works well enough I almost, but not quite, wonder why I bother with a jointer…”

@DB – do you give free home demonstrations? I could drop by just about anytime you have a few minutes to spare. :-)

I would like to see your sled in action.
Thanks
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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