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Was given a couple planes but have questions.

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Forum topic by PaPa_Jack posted 06-09-2014 02:17 AM 529 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PaPa_Jack

8 posts in 144 days


06-09-2014 02:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question plane craftsman recondition

I was given three planes by a friends wife. He passed away about a year ago and had these in his little workshop. I never knew he was into any kind of woodworking. All three are rusted but if fair shape. One is a Stanley block plane that just needed light rust removed. One is a Veritas that was never used but the box was wet and it too was rusted. The third is a Craftsman that is heavily rusted.

I glued some wet/dry sandpaper to a granite plate and cleaned up most of the Craftsman but have a question. There is an area around the mouth that appears to have been designed to sit deeper than the bottom.

[URL=http://s1205.photobucket.com/user/PaPaJack/media/Questions/IMG1002zps8082bcf8.jpg.html][IMG]http://i1205.photobucket.com/albums/bb428/Pa_Pa_Jack/Questions/IMG_1002_zps8082bcf8.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

Is this normal?


14 replies so far

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

1388 posts in 540 days


#1 posted 06-09-2014 02:20 AM

No, just not flat enough. Keep going.

-- Never confuse mistakes with failure. Kevin

View Deycart's profile

Deycart

384 posts in 908 days


#2 posted 06-09-2014 02:45 AM

Yep, keep going… You will be much happier when it’s all flat. However there is a laundry list of other plane feting task that need to be done. Properly sharpen the blade, mate the chipbreaker, flatten the frog if necessary. After all that you need to decide what kind of planing you want to do and then set the plane for that type of work.

View Paul's profile

Paul

520 posts in 216 days


#3 posted 06-09-2014 04:52 AM

I’m a novice, so take what I say with a grain of salt. My last Stanley that I restored looked very similar. The suggestion to keep going with flattening it, I listened to. I ended up up going too far, I flattened the sole to the mouth and ended up with an unusable plane due to taking off too much of the sole. There wasn’t enough metal to support it if taken down too much.

This sort of experience is costly to someone 100% self taught like myself.

Reach out to your local woodworking community for some hands on experience. It’s helped me grow as a woodworker. Offer your time for free to sweep a shop and clean it for some over the shoulder look at how experienced people operate.

Paul

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

6950 posts in 1334 days


#4 posted 06-09-2014 11:32 AM

By looking at the last photo, you MIGHT be able to stop there. The sole is for a JACK plane, not a smoother. The iron/ cutter can be ground to a 8” radius, and sharpened up that way. You can then USE the Jack to do what it is designed for…..to take rough lumber down to almost smooth and flat. The Jack plane should be used first, and a smooth plane would then just get the surface smoothed for a finish. The Jack does all the work, the smoother gets the glory sort of thing.

IF you can, go watch an older episode of The Woodwright’s Shop @ pbs.org Look up Hand Plane essentials with Chris Schwarz. An entire half hour show about the usage of these planes. Eye opener!

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Don W's profile

Don W

15017 posts in 1218 days


#5 posted 06-09-2014 12:02 PM

the real test is how does it work? Like bandit said, if your using it as a jack, it probably ok. I wouldn’t try to make it a smoother. For what a different one will cost it doesn’t seem worth the effort.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

249 posts in 725 days


#6 posted 06-09-2014 02:11 PM

WOW….... Close; get it closer.
If it is a smoother absolute flat. If jack you need it flat to flatten the surface.

It really depends on the plane usage. Some plane sides are so off that if I removed it to make it square the side walls would be TOO thin.

I can live with no square sides but the sole MUST be flat in my book!

View PaPa_Jack's profile

PaPa_Jack

8 posts in 144 days


#7 posted 06-09-2014 02:54 PM

I really appreciate all the responses. It seems we have a little discourse about proper way. I have always been told that the bottom of any plane should be very flat. Hence the reason for this question. It looks like this plane was designed with this taper all around the mouth. It is a very even and consistent “flow”. It is also quite deep. I fear that if I work it down, the bottom will be so thin it might be unusable. I didn’t measure the plane, but it is about 12 inches long. I assume it was intended to be a Jack plane. The blade has no radius though. Of course it is a Craftsman so it might not be the highest quality plane available at the time.

I think I will sharpen the blade to an 8” radius and try it, as is, to work some rough cut red oak I have in the shop.

Jack

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

249 posts in 725 days


#8 posted 06-09-2014 03:02 PM

Sounds odd. Do you have a picture of the handplane? The taper should not be consistent unless it was intended.

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PaPa_Jack

8 posts in 144 days


#9 posted 06-09-2014 03:17 PM

JohnChung, see my first post. Pictures are there.

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JohnChung

249 posts in 725 days


#10 posted 06-09-2014 03:27 PM

I checked the photo. It is only the sole of the plane. Just wondering if it was #4, #5 or something exotic.

View sikrap's profile

sikrap

1015 posts in 2010 days


#11 posted 06-09-2014 03:44 PM

I wouldn’t spend a whole lot of time trying to resurrect the Craftsman. It will be a good learning experience, but ts a lot of work for a so-so plane. What’s the Veritas?

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

View PaPa_Jack's profile

PaPa_Jack

8 posts in 144 days


#12 posted 06-09-2014 04:31 PM

I posted more pics of all three planes on Photobucket. Use the link in the first post.

Dave, I agree about the Craftsman, but these are now the only three planes I own so, I want to be able to at least use them to learn.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15017 posts in 1218 days


#13 posted 06-09-2014 04:46 PM

The craftsman is a late Stanley made jack. Sharpen the radius and it will work as a jack just fine.
I doubt the mouth was ever made like that, at least not intentionally. I’ve never seen another plane like it and can’t think of a reason you’d do it.

The veritas is a nice low angle smoother. A very nice plane to own. I’m sure the sole on that is already flat and a good sharpening (and maybe some work to flatten and polish the back of the cutter) should be all it needs.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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JohnChung

249 posts in 725 days


#14 posted 06-09-2014 04:46 PM

The craftsman looks very much like a #5. It is odd the mouth is tapered. I don’t recall it a standard practise for any #5. The veritas is a low angle smoother. That sole needs to be flat.

I guess I would leave the sole of the #5 as it is. I can’t get anything out of google why the sole was designed such away. But I am certain that the veritas MUST be flat!

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