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Is this worth keeping? Citrus wood.

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Forum topic by RyRat posted 06-08-2014 05:38 PM 1577 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RyRat

27 posts in 981 days


06-08-2014 05:38 PM

Topic tags/keywords: citrus wood split

Picked up a few logs of freshly cut citrus wood recently. I was sawing it into small slabs yesterday. This morning i walked out to find it is already split down the middle. Is it worth sawing down the rest of the logs? what is the fix for this?

-- If you are flammable and have legs, you are never blocking a fire exit. -Mitch Hedberg


9 replies so far

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WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1942 days


#1 posted 06-09-2014 02:03 AM

The fix is to slow the drying down. The cracks come from too rapid drying. However, some woods can be so finicky to dry that they are a challenge. Try stacking the boards with 1/2” spacers between the boards, but not inside a heated and cooled space, but rather outside under cover like a shed, barn, or garage.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View richardwootton's profile

richardwootton

1699 posts in 1421 days


#2 posted 06-09-2014 03:42 AM

Definitely worth keeping. Just look at it, it’s gorgeous!

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View RyRat's profile

RyRat

27 posts in 981 days


#3 posted 06-09-2014 02:23 PM

How do I slow the drying down? This happened within 12 hours of sawing. This was in a garage on stickers. I’m in Phoenix, if I put them outside they will bake. Maybe this it the wrong time of year to be sawing down logs?

Yes, they are gorgeous. Thanks!

-- If you are flammable and have legs, you are never blocking a fire exit. -Mitch Hedberg

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1414 days


#4 posted 06-09-2014 08:56 PM

I’m think maybe they are destined to be turning blanks

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

3140 posts in 1334 days


#5 posted 06-09-2014 09:29 PM

I’m no expert but I’ve read a few of these threads for different wood types.

1) wax or paint the ends of the log.

2) sticker them outside, covered. In Arizona (isn’t that Polynesian for “arid zone”?) there might be an entirely different set of rules. (Closed garage utilizing a humidifier?)

3) inside is too dry. It might be that you need to leave them uncut for a few weeks. IIRC, this is actually a no no, but perhaps with the ends waxed, and the bark intact, moisture would equalize more gradually, thus preventing checking (cracking and splitting).

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2609 days


#6 posted 06-09-2014 09:50 PM

“this is actually a no no, but perhaps with the ends waxed, and the bark intact, moisture would equalize more gradually, thus preventing checking (cracking and splitting).”

I have had some birch logs in my shop for a few weeks, bark on, ends waxed with Anchorseal 2, and they are not showing signs of checking yet. At this time of year my shop tends to be in the lower 60s for temperature and ranging from 50-65% humidity depending on how long ago the dehumidifier shut itself off for being too full.

View rrww's profile

rrww

263 posts in 1579 days


#7 posted 06-09-2014 11:03 PM

Was the tree damaged in a storm?

View RyRat's profile

RyRat

27 posts in 981 days


#8 posted 06-10-2014 12:03 AM

Thanks everyone for the input.

Not sure if it was storm damaged. I found them fresh cut in the alley when walking the dog.

I painted the ends and cut up a few more slabs. Really hoping the new ones don’t check in the same way. They look amazing!

-- If you are flammable and have legs, you are never blocking a fire exit. -Mitch Hedberg

View Nomad62's profile

Nomad62

726 posts in 2424 days


#9 posted 06-10-2014 04:31 PM

Try surrounding the wood with some sort of air block, like a loose fitting tarp or blanket. It needs some air movement, but not as much as it has. Damage like that is due to drying, and in your area it will simply dry too fast. If you were in a moist area the damage may be less, but that is not guaranteed; it may crack at any drying rate, just taking longer to do it. It is likely it will not dry without cracking to some extent, but it’s worth a shot anyway. The only risk of drying too slowly is mold or mildew growth, something I’d doubt you’ll have a problem with unless you plastic-wrapped it. Best of luck.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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