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how would you make *this* cut?

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Forum topic by mzimmers posted 06-08-2014 01:40 AM 983 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mzimmers

168 posts in 3376 days


06-08-2014 01:40 AM

I’ve asked a lot of these “how would you” questions here, and LJ has yet to fail me.

This time I want to create the cut in the end of a 2×4 so that I can insert another 2×4 into the end of it. Since I can’t draw a picture, I’ll describe what wood is to be removed: a 1.5×1.5×3.5 bar from the middle of an end. The wood being cut is going to be stood on end, and support a long crosspiece running through the slots that I’m trying to figure out how to do.

These slots don’t have to be perfect, but I’d like a reasonably tight fit. I though of running the work end-ways into my table saw to get the sides of the cut, but I’m kind of at a loss at how to finish the bottom of the channel.

The wood is PTF, if that makes any difference.

Thanks, guys, as always.

-- M. Zimmers


9 replies so far

View derosa's profile

derosa

1568 posts in 2297 days


#1 posted 06-08-2014 01:51 AM

Best bet is a band saw if you have one, Mark off the area to be removed and make a series of cuts then chop out the waste with a chisel. Other wise a jig saw might be better doing the same as above. Move slow on the two side cuts to make sure the blade doesn’t wander outside your lines. Table saw isn’t that great for what you want to do unless the board is short and you have a tenon jig to hold the board steady.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View RogerInColorado's profile

RogerInColorado

321 posts in 1415 days


#2 posted 06-08-2014 02:09 AM

I’d use a handsaw if you don’t have or can’t borrow a band saw. The probability of getting a straight cut with a jigsaw on a 1.5 thick board is pretty remote. I’d call what you are trying to do a bridle joint. Not precisely, but close enough to get the point across.

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

3140 posts in 1330 days


#3 posted 06-08-2014 02:09 AM

Just go right for the chisels. This also helps up the points on your man card.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2632 posts in 2570 days


#4 posted 06-08-2014 02:28 AM

I have one of these that makes short work of these kind of joints, and it’s really quiet. It’ll make your cuts in short order and is easy to control. Though you may want to use a glove on the off hand, in case of a skip. This baby is sharp. The rest is chisel work.
http://www.rockler.com/takuma-240mm-ryoba-saw

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

168 posts in 3376 days


#5 posted 06-08-2014 01:21 PM

Thanks for the suggestions, guys. I kind of figured there’d be some chiseling in this project, but I was hoping for a miracle answer.

Of course, I could buy a bandsaw, but it’s Sunday and I’m not sure what Lowe’s has to offer (they’re the only game in town).

-- M. Zimmers

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Buckethead

3140 posts in 1330 days


#6 posted 06-08-2014 01:35 PM

Embrace the chisels. “Use the Force, zimmers.”

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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mzimmers

168 posts in 3376 days


#7 posted 06-08-2014 01:36 PM

Hahaha…my chisel “set” is pretty embarrassing; maybe that’s what I should invest in.

How does PTF react to being chiseled, anyway?

-- M. Zimmers

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Buckethead

3140 posts in 1330 days


#8 posted 06-08-2014 01:38 PM

I’m not sure what PTF is. Is that pressure treated fir?
Just use the circular saw to cut out as much material as possible, then finish with the chisels. It will take less time than driving to lowes.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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Buckethead

3140 posts in 1330 days


#9 posted 06-08-2014 01:40 PM

But having a sharp chisel would make a far easier job of it. High dollar chisels are not required.

Oh… And if it’s wood, it’ll chisel. Some woods are harder than others, but it sounds like you actually have a fairly easy task.

If you have an old abused chisel that is dull, and a grinder, you could make do for sharpening there. But just go slow as to not overheat the steel. Don’t turn it blue.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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