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How dry must Maple be?

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Forum topic by TedHains posted 57 days ago 474 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TedHains

20 posts in 1400 days


57 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: maple

I had a Maple log sawn to 5/4 last August, stacker with dividers stored under a tarp in North MN. what moister should it be down to so I can make a Table?

-- God determines the number of days, but you determine how they are spent. Ps 118:24


15 replies so far

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pintodeluxe

3279 posts in 1417 days


#1 posted 57 days ago

Once it is down to 14-15% moisture content, you can take it inside to dry it out. Either set up a kiln with a home dehumidifier, or bring it into a climate controlled shop. Once it is 6-8% you are ready to build.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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Shawn Masterson

1243 posts in 552 days


#2 posted 57 days ago

IMHO 6-8% seem low. The wood will equalize to the ambient moisture where it is. I have never used a moisture meter. I generally leave my wood stickered and stacked with a roof cover (open on the sides) for 1 year an inch.

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kdc68

1942 posts in 881 days


#3 posted 57 days ago

Acceptable moisture content (MC) is a variable depending on the in-use location, say 6 to 14%...??....

Ideally the moisture content should be within 2 percentage points of the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of the in-use location…..

I’m sure I will be corrected if I am wrong… I will follow this post to see…. ;-)

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Hammerthumb

1126 posts in 579 days


#4 posted 57 days ago

Agree with kdc68. Here in Las Vegas mc will get below 6% in my shop. If I was in Florida it might be as high as 14-16%. When the moisture content reaches equilibrium (stops changing) is when it is ready.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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Hammerthumb

1126 posts in 579 days


#5 posted 57 days ago

By the way, typical kiln drying will be between 6 to 9%.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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WDHLT15

1079 posts in 1080 days


#6 posted 57 days ago

If the table is to be used in a house, 8% is a good target. If you air dry it to 15%, then bring it inside and sticker it inside you house in an out-of-the-way place, it will reach equilibrium in 3 or 4 weeks. The equilibrium M% will be lower in winter due to heating your house. So, design a little shrinkage into your project.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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TedHains

20 posts in 1400 days


#7 posted 57 days ago

Thanks Danney

-- God determines the number of days, but you determine how they are spent. Ps 118:24

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TedHains

20 posts in 1400 days


#8 posted 57 days ago

Thank you one and All, This has been a BIG help.

-- God determines the number of days, but you determine how they are spent. Ps 118:24

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WDHLT15

1079 posts in 1080 days


#9 posted 57 days ago

Maple will air dry to 15% here in Georgia in 3 – 4 months. A little faster if you keep a couple of fans on the stack. In more Northern climates, it will dry slower. You have to have good air flow or the lumber will gray stain. It is an enzymatic oxidation reaction in the wood that occurs in high humidity and warm temperatures. The fans really help a lot to prevent it, but I always seem to get some gray stain when air drying maple.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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Shawn Masterson

1243 posts in 552 days


#10 posted 57 days ago

I find these numbers very interesting. I had some start of the season AC troubles (fixed 4 days ago) and have my jobsite thermometer in my living room and the humidity on it right now says 42% @72*. I live in northern Indiana. The high low variations for the last 24 hours is 41%-43%(it stores for 24 hours). Am I comparing something wrong here?

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WDHLT15

1079 posts in 1080 days


#11 posted 57 days ago

At 42% relative humidity and 72 degrees, the EMC (equilibrium moisture content) is 8%.

The numbers sound right.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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TheFridge

545 posts in 90 days


#12 posted 57 days ago

Dry it a year per inch then acclimate it if possible. Similar to when wood floors are going to be put in a home you want to put it in your house to let the moisture content in the wood and the house equalize.

I put crown molding in my house when I remodeled. It went straight from an outdoor but covered rack at a lumber yard in south louisiana, to cut up and installed in my house. I wondered for years why my crown shrunk weeks after I put it in. It cracked the caulk and caused gaps. It sucked to have to recaulk and repaint.

-- "We build our workshops. Then we enjoy the fruits of our labor by laboring for more fruits." - Me

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WDHLT15

1079 posts in 1080 days


#13 posted 57 days ago

I would air dry it till it is air dried. The time will vary depending on your location and climate. In the deep South, we get good drying even in winter. The wood never freezes. In the North, there are less good air drying days, and in the winter in many places with lots of snow, there is not much air drying that takes place in winter.

If I air dried wood for a year per inch, I would waste a lot of time. That is why a good moisture meter is important if you dry much wood at all.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln

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TedHains

20 posts in 1400 days


#14 posted 57 days ago

Thank you so much everyone for all the help. I am good now, I found a Kiln to do the drying for me. Happy, Happy.

-- God determines the number of days, but you determine how they are spent. Ps 118:24

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Nomad62

691 posts in 1562 days


#15 posted 55 days ago

Shawn, air humidity is different than wood humidity. These numbers are stating the percentage of moisture each has in comparison to what each can potentially hold; wood can hold more water volume that air per cubic inch, so it’s moisture content when ready for valid woodworking will read much lower that the air it sets in.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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