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ambrosia maple please help!

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Forum topic by whitesferry posted 06-01-2014 08:04 PM 786 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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whitesferry

17 posts in 201 days


06-01-2014 08:04 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource maple

Hi everyone Im new here . i recently purchased some ambrosia maple from a friend threw a another friend who works at a saw mill to build a coffee table top . i have many questions . 1 – i see the tiny tooth pick size pin holes in the stripes of the wood how can i be certain that all the larve /beetles are gone /dead so i don’t have problems down the road . the material is 6 foot long 28 inch wide and 2 inch thick is there a product to treat the wood with ? will it render the wood seceptable only to certain types of finishing options ?right now its just biscuit’ed together but raw wood i have no way of knowing if it was kiln dried but he did say it was laying around as a slab a while / months. question 2- how should i go about filling the pin holes with what ? wood putty/filler -saw dust glue pack it in there, ? i m unsure . question 3 – obviously i need to sand it a million times 80 grit thru 220 and higher but i have been directed to use something call maple danish oil several times that’s as much as i know at this point Im no wood worker buy any strech of the means after that he said about lacquer but i have no idea how to go about any of this please help id really really appreciate any and all replies without help from this site Im lost and have no idea how to acheive or get a desired good finish that’s gonna last i want it to come out nice for all the work i put in thanks in advance


11 replies so far

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tnwood

206 posts in 1832 days


#1 posted 06-01-2014 08:45 PM

Well, if it was kiln dried there shouldn’t be any live critters left unless it was laying around somewhere damp. If you don’t see any dust falling out of it, it is likely okay. If you think there are powder post beetles, there are several borax compounds around that you apply and as you prepare the slab by flattening and sanding, should not pose any problems with finishing. As far as the finish, danish oil has no real meaning. If you expect the top to be subject to wear and moisture, then an oil finish isn’t the best option. In that case, I would likely use an oil to enhance the character and then apply polyurethane over it. Lacquer is an option of course. I would not fill the pin holes in the slab. They are part of the character of the wood. Good luck.

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whitesferry

17 posts in 201 days


#2 posted 06-02-2014 02:45 AM

hi my name is alex thank you so much for your reply . i was going to sand it then use maple watco danish oil to bring out the character of the wood several coats then lacquer but i have no idea how or what to buy can u guide me please i never done this before thank you thus far alex

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whitesferry

17 posts in 201 days


#3 posted 06-02-2014 03:00 AM

im a mason not a woodworker craftsmen i can do anyting with a brick or block.no so with stain sealing cutting finish work sure i form concrete so i know basic tools but in me free time im lreaning i guess about things i like and wanted to try wood work so i can make something for my family. your wood work is beautiful ive seen ur pictures u know ur stuff im 32 i dont know much lol most folks on here are older then i am i see but i guess ive a old soul i live like im 70 everyone says so but i need alot help

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Rick

7279 posts in 1778 days


#4 posted 06-02-2014 03:08 AM

Alex:

I realize that you are new here. However. There is another Forum called ”Finishing” that deals Specifically with this type of Question. You might have better Luck getting more responses in there.

This Forum is ”Lumberjocks.com Site Feedback Forum”. Members post here when there is something wrong with the Site or just to recommend a Possible Change to the Site.

Good Luck!

-- How long is a Minute? That depends on which side of the Bathroom Door You're On!

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tnwood

206 posts in 1832 days


#5 posted 06-03-2014 12:07 AM

Alex,
If you are set on using the Watco, then that is your first step. Before you commit to that, I recommend you try a couple of things like the Watco, boiled linseed oil which is a lot cheaper, maybe even some shellac as a first coat. If you don’t have any scraps, you can do this on the bottom of the table slab. Then I would experiment with lacquer (you can buy the spray rattle cans almost everywhere), maybe some wipe on polyurethane, or maybe just shellac as a top coat. I never know quite what finish I am going to apply to a project until I start making sample boards of various combinations to find what I like best. By the way, Rick’s comment to post your questions down on the Finishing forum might get you more expert assistance as well. Don’t be in a rush to finish your slab. It is difficult if not impossible to remedy a botched finish.

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WDHLT15

1210 posts in 1222 days


#6 posted 06-03-2014 12:53 AM

Ambrosia maple is called this because of the ambrosia beetle. It attacks the living tree, does not kill it, and brings a fungus in with it on its body. This fungus is what creates the blue-green streak. The beetles cannot live in dry wood (unlike the dreaded powderpost beetle), so they are long gone and do not pose a threat anymore. You do not have to do anything to the wood except enjoy it.

As to the beetle holes, this is part of what makes ambrosia unique and so cool. If you do not like the beetle holes, you probably should be using another type of wood. Filling the beetle holes sort of defeats the charm of what created the wood and figure in the first place.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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whitesferry

17 posts in 201 days


#7 posted 06-05-2014 02:11 AM

i did find a live beetle tiny smaller then an ant i googled it i did look like a babywood boaring beetle what should i do? the slab is still just biscuit jointed together and is cut to the demension i need roughly but not sanded above a gentlemen replied that the beetle cant still be alive. what if they are powder post beetles how do i kill all the bugs to be sure. i wont have problems cant i rub the wood with something before i begin danish oil process or whatever i decide to start with thanks guys alex

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WDHLT15

1210 posts in 1222 days


#8 posted 06-06-2014 11:27 AM

The holes associated with the flame-like stain came from ambrosia beetles. If the wood is dry, they are gone. But, you could have some other type of beetle too. Heating the wood to an internal temp of 140 degrees for 4 – 6 hours will kill all beetles, eggs, and larvae.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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camps764

814 posts in 1105 days


#9 posted 06-06-2014 11:48 AM

I recently did an Ash slab type table for a client. It had a lot of cool holes, character and figuring.

To finish I applied a few liberal coats of Boiled Linseed Oil to bring out the figure and color. After that cured for a few days I applied several thin coats of wipe-on Poly (Polyurethane thinned 50/50 with Mineral spirits) and then two coats of Regular High Gloss Polyurethane cut with Mineral spirits at a 1:10 ratio.

After these two coats dried I lightly sanded with 220 grit paper to get rid of brush marks, rubbed it all down with 0000 steel wool, and then applied 3 more coats of the 50/50 wipe on poly to get ride of any left over sanding marks.

Here’s the result:

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com

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JesseTutt

811 posts in 856 days


#10 posted 06-06-2014 12:12 PM

Following up on Danny’s (WDHLT15) comments, there are several plans on the Internet for building a small solar powered kiln or one powered by a couple of light bulbs. Through together one of them and bake the wood at 140 degrees for a month. You imply that you have biscuit joined the wood together, I would cut the wood at the biscuits as smaller pieces would dry faster. Also, consider coating the ends of the wood with paraffin wax or paint to decrease splitting.

The choice of finish depends on what you want the wood to look like and what you are using the wood for. Shellac is an easy finish but will soften if exposed to alcohol so does not make a good top layer of finish on a table where alcoholic drinks will be placed. For table tops that will have a lot of use poly is the best.

Many woodworkers will help beginners so you might check in your area to see if there are any woodworking clubs and attend a meeting.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

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whitesferry

17 posts in 201 days


#11 posted 06-08-2014 09:41 PM

thanks everyone for your help it’s great im learning alot

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