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Forum topic by mzimmers posted 06-01-2014 01:43 PM 694 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mzimmers

121 posts in 2570 days


06-01-2014 01:43 PM

...cutting very small pieces of hardwood? I make some spline boxes (I’m sure many of you have seen the plans online) that call for little triangular pieces about 1/8” thick. I can create the triangle profile fairly easily on my table saw, but…what would make it easier to knock out the 1/8” cuts?

Band saw? Scroll saw? Something I’m overlooking? Currently I do it on my miter saw, which apart from the 50% waste, gets a little tedious looking around the shop for wherever the saw threw the little piece just after cutting it.

Thanks for any ideas…

-- M. Zimmers


21 replies so far

View TiggerWood's profile

TiggerWood

197 posts in 261 days


#1 posted 06-01-2014 01:54 PM

I work with small pieces and find the scroll saw to work best.

View mzimmers's profile

mzimmers

121 posts in 2570 days


#2 posted 06-01-2014 01:55 PM

Thanks, TiggerWood. Do you have a particular technique for cutting exact thicknesses? This is a big time-saver in making these parts.

-- M. Zimmers

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TiggerWood

197 posts in 261 days


#3 posted 06-01-2014 02:04 PM

After a little Googling, it seems that the best approach is to make a spline jig for the table or miter saw. Just Google spline jig.

Basically, I guess you would cut the thickness first and then go to town cutting all the splines, I think.

Hmm, they have jigs that work either way. Your choice.

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TiggerWood

197 posts in 261 days


#4 posted 06-01-2014 02:16 PM

Thanks for posting this question. I’m learning a lot from it.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1677 posts in 1577 days


#5 posted 06-01-2014 02:31 PM

I make thin pieces myself and cut the thickness first non my table saw, then the shape. Just as TiggerWood suggested.

-- In God We Trust

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1286 posts in 1714 days


#6 posted 06-01-2014 02:46 PM

What about a quick simple hand tool option? I would use a good fine tooth back saw. A Japanese style pull saw has a very thin kerf. Almost zero waste and cuts fast. If you need precision, use a bench hook or some type of miter box you can build yourself.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

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a1Jim

112093 posts in 2232 days


#7 posted 06-01-2014 03:54 PM

A thin stock ripping jig will do the job.Here’s one Matt made.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/84494

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2710 posts in 1232 days


#8 posted 06-01-2014 05:37 PM

I cut the strips on the table saw, the triangle shape on the bandsaw (less waste).
I don’t use a thin strip jig; I use a sacrificial pusher with the stock between the fence and blade. With a riving knife and pusher, it’s plenty safe.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

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mzimmers

121 posts in 2570 days


#9 posted 06-01-2014 05:47 PM

Thanks for all the suggestion, guys. All the options are good, but it sounds like the one that suits my needs best is NiteWalker’s.

Now…if I can just figure out to keep the saw from tossing the little triangles into the dark corner of the garage and/or the vacuum from sucking it up. Maybe a little 1/8” block between the riving knife and the fence? The cut stock’s never going to get that far.

-- M. Zimmers

View muleskinner's profile

muleskinner

674 posts in 1092 days


#10 posted 06-01-2014 06:24 PM

I’ve done a few splined miters. I use the planer to get the thickness first. Then just cut chunks for the splines. Trim and sand after gluing.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10874 posts in 1345 days


#11 posted 06-02-2014 12:25 AM

I plane stock to the exact thickness to fit the spline slot, then cut slightly oversized triangles with the little bandsaw.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

1547 posts in 376 days


#12 posted 06-02-2014 01:01 AM

If you’re already starting with fairly small strips, the bandsaw would probably be the safest route, also fairly small kerf to if your cutting something pricey (like ironwood). A good tablesaw jig would be more likely to leave a finish that required little if any sanding before installation, but much larger kerf if your cutting down something with any substantial width.

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mzimmers

121 posts in 2570 days


#13 posted 06-02-2014 09:42 PM

I haven’t tried planing to 1/8” yet. I have a DeWalt DW735 with the Byrd cutter; I know that’s about at the ragged edge of what it will do. Worth a try, I suppose.

Getting the thickness exact is more important to me than getting the other dimensions right. I can always use a trim router bit to clean up any extra, but if the thickness isn’t right, it makes insertion a real chore.

-- M. Zimmers

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10874 posts in 1345 days


#14 posted 06-03-2014 12:27 AM

If you double face tape your stock to a flat board, you can plane thinner than 1/8”. Just take really small ‘bites’ when you get close to the final thickness. I usually use my drum sander to thickness my splines but have used the planer in the past and it worked fine.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

192 posts in 1722 days


#15 posted 06-03-2014 03:15 AM

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