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Round-edges that are stopped against another piece???

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Forum topic by JayinChicago posted 05-28-2014 04:28 PM 751 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JayinChicago

5 posts in 934 days


05-28-2014 04:28 PM

I built a wine rack for a cellar space we have, and I rounded over the edges of all the vertical pieces with a 1/8” round-over bit, but every vertical piece intersects several horizontal pieces, and because of the router base the bit isn’t able to run right up to the intersection of the two pieces. So what I’m left with are vertical pieces that have a nice 1/8” rounded edge until they get close to the horizontal pieces where the edge becomes more square.

I’m getting ready to build some more of these racks and I’m trying to figure out a way to get a nice clean rounded edge all the way up to the intersection of the horizontal “braces” that help hold all the vertical pieces together. I don’t know a lot about hand-tools, but would a simple card scraper allow me to start right at the intersection and round over the couple of inches that the router doesn’t get? I guess another way to look at it is I need a tool that will allow me to get the blade right up against the horizontal piece and then push/pull along the vertical piece’s edge several times to round it over.

This photo isn’t the greatest at illustrating what I’m talking about, but hopefully it helps clarify my confusing description. Although if you look carefully at the 2nd vertical piece in from the left you can sort of see how the edge goes from rounded to a slightly more square edge as it gets towards the horizontal bottom piece.


5 replies so far

View Ripthorn's profile

Ripthorn

1406 posts in 2446 days


#1 posted 05-28-2014 04:48 PM

If your wood is relatively straight grained and you aren’t trying to go across the grain with it, something like a slick plane will do it in no time. Lee Valley sells a cornering tool that has 4 different radii. Would be much quicker than a router for those spots, and a lot safer and more effective. A card scraper would only be good for getting rid of the sharp corner, but not leaving a perfect roundover. A scratch stock might do it, but a cornering tool isyour best bet.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#2 posted 05-28-2014 05:04 PM

You could route the way you are now, and then round over the rest with a rasp/file. Or you could just do it as you’re doing now, and call it a intentional design element.

Can you do the routing prior to assembly? If you know where the cross-members will be, you simply stop the cut at those points.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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JayinChicago

5 posts in 934 days


#3 posted 05-28-2014 05:15 PM

Actually in a perfect world Ed’s right I should just rout right up to the point where the cross pieces will be, however I didn’t trust my math enough to know precisely where the cross pieces would go prior to putting all the bottle supports on, because it’s the bottle spacing that determines where the horizontal braces go. So what I did was run the router down the edges but wound up giving myself a pretty wide cushion on either side of the are where the horizontal piece would go. What i really wanted to do was somehow create a rounded dado in the horizontal pieces, so I could simply round the entire edge of the vertical pieces and then just have them fit into the dado on the horizontal braces. Unfortunately I couldn’t come up with a method that was consistently repeatable and gave me a good fit.

That said now that I have a better idea of what I’m doing I might be able to get a bit closer on my next one, but I do like the idea of using a rasp/file to clean up the vertical edge. The rasp/file and some sandpaper might get me the result I’m looking for.

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1831 days


#4 posted 05-28-2014 05:44 PM

It sounds like the first one worked out the kinks and you’re getting into the following pieces with a bit more confidence. It also sounds like using a story stick would help you a lot, if you’re making multiple pieces and want everything to line up. Once you know where the pieces go, a story stick, combined with cutting all like pieces at the same time with the same setup, will yield more accurate results.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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JayinChicago

5 posts in 934 days


#5 posted 05-28-2014 05:57 PM

Yeah it’s not exactly a story stick, but I have a large layout jig that I use along with several different spacer blocks to ensure that all of the bottle slots are the same size, and that the dados on the horizontal pieces are all the same width. That way I can (hopefully) build the cellar out in installments and every rack will have the same basic dimensions and spacing even if one section is built a year after the previous one.

I do like the idea of a story stick to lock in the spacing of the horizontal pieces so they’ll all line up as the racks get put next to each other though

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