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Favorite Industrial woodworking equipment?

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Forum topic by Jesse posted 05-28-2014 02:07 PM 1253 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jesse

58 posts in 1090 days


05-28-2014 02:07 PM

I know a lot of us are hobby woodworkers but I’m guessing a lot of you have worked in millwork and cabinet shops, woodshops, etc. I am wondering what is out there for production work where you have to make a lot of repeatable parts and pieces and stuff like that. I know it is expensive but what is out there for the big companies to use as far as wood working goes. Of course we all know about the CNC routing machines, wide belt sanders, and edge banding machines but is there other good innovative stuff out there?


13 replies so far

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1643 posts in 1781 days


#1 posted 05-28-2014 02:16 PM

My personal favorite are the hot presses and film adhesives used at the formerly named Carl Booth Veneer company. It just takes a minute to cut the glue to size then send the panel through the press. It comes out the back end flawless.

Tumbler systems are fun but mysterious. Nobody talks about how they’re being used in the wood industry but I know a lot of companies utilize them for bulk production of small parts.

Veneer guillotines are another favorite. Straight cuts on thick, long stacks of veneer are things only possible in the small shop via the use of slow and clumsy jig setups. Most of them take minutes to accomplish at best and require sacrificial panels. Not so with the guillotine.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#2 posted 05-28-2014 03:17 PM

We had a few that I liked in the mill work shop I used to work in: 16” Delta/Invicta jointer, 14” Delta RT-40 table saw, DeWalt 18” radial arm saw. 24” Delta/Invicta planer. Some of it would have been nice to have when they liquidated before going under.

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Loren

8303 posts in 3112 days


#3 posted 05-28-2014 04:53 PM

I find an overarm router useful for making jigs and curved
parts. You can get one pretty cheap at auction these
days since they’ve been generally replaced by CNC.

I haven’t worked in a big shop with exotic machinery.

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JAAune

1643 posts in 1781 days


#4 posted 05-28-2014 05:02 PM

I haven’t actually worked in any large shops. My knowledge about heavy equipment comes from a lot of research, tours, experimentation, auctions and talking to people. Even though I can’t afford the heavy equipment, the concepts often apply on a smaller scale so it’s good to know about them.

That veneering hot press would run over $60,000 new based upon my conversation with a dealer. That’s out of my budget for now but one never knows what the future holds. Even if I can’t buy that, there’s still a chance I can find a way to build a miniature version if it ever becomes necessary.

People always talk about how hard it is to make a living as a woodworker but taking a look at how the profitable companies manage can be eye-opening. That’s my motivation for acquiring knowledge of high-dollar machines.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View rrww's profile

rrww

263 posts in 1577 days


#5 posted 05-28-2014 05:20 PM

The more uncommon ones I have:
Stroke Sander = happiness

furniture assembly press – like a case clamp

Pin router

Used heavy equipment is cheap, but the costs come in rigging, and power requirements.

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Loren

8303 posts in 3112 days


#6 posted 05-28-2014 05:30 PM

My stroke sander. Got it at auction for under $300. Table is folded
down for storage here.

Hess edgebanding press. It cures RF/hot press compatible glue in
about a minute. Got it at auction for like 20 cents a pound.

I have one of these too. It flush trims solid wood edgebanding
with copy wheels top and bottom. It spins up to speed like
a Messerschmitt… something like 9000 rpm at the dual
4” cutterheads.

View rrww's profile

rrww

263 posts in 1577 days


#7 posted 05-28-2014 05:37 PM

I love the mini max stroke sander, I wish my beach folded up & had electric lift!

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2018 posts in 1632 days


#8 posted 05-28-2014 05:48 PM

Pictures tells more then woords.

Italian kitchen cabinet making:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4eCFAWuRkY

Dutch window making
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tj8EbAgS5tQ

German stair making
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD7jkfnzPp8

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1185 days


#9 posted 05-29-2014 02:28 AM

$300 is a screaming deal for a stroke sander. I’ve used one before and they are the best for panels! Most have a standard frame motor that can be found in single phase if you don’t have three phase.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1643 posts in 1781 days


#10 posted 05-29-2014 02:30 AM

The other hidden cost behind industrial machines would be space. They usually consume a large footprint and square footage can be expensive.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View redSLED's profile

redSLED

790 posts in 1357 days


#11 posted 05-29-2014 12:53 PM

Dunno about innovative, but I would love to acquire a big mechanical press to laminate sheetgoods, and a CNC router setup. These both have a 99% chance of not happening however.

-- Perfection is the difference between too much and not enough.

View Jesse's profile

Jesse

58 posts in 1090 days


#12 posted 05-29-2014 01:38 PM

Those are some cool videos. I agree about the hidden costs of industrial machines. The space is not so much an issue for me as my shop is about 3000 sqft. The power requirements can be a bit taxing though and I really hate having to rent a forklift to move stuff. As the company grows though I just wanted to be aware of the other options out there that I may not have known about so this thread has been interesting for me so far, keep them coming!

One larger industrial type of saw that looks really dangerous but is fun to see old pictures of is those giant pendulum saws (some called them swing saws).

View rrww's profile

rrww

263 posts in 1577 days


#13 posted 05-29-2014 06:58 PM

I hear ya.. I think the next thing I need is a all terrain forklift. Only problem is they cost 10x most of equipment I get a auction. That sucks.

Once the machines are in they get put on pallets or beams so most of them can be moved with pallet jacks. It also is nice if you want to improve the layout for better flow.

I have found that there is a ton of a lot of very niche equipment that you may never even heard of – it all depends on what your doing. And then you have to figure out how to adapt it to whatever it is that you are doing.

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