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Forum topic by mramseyISU posted 05-27-2014 04:40 PM 1104 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1008 days


05-27-2014 04:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router

I’m in the middle of making a few cutting boards and while that’s all well and good I’m having a terrible time getting the right bit for making the juice groove in it. I’d like to have a flat bottom groove and all of my straight bits burn the hell out of the groove. Would switching over to one of the spiral upcutting bits work? If that would work what about a center cutting endmill? I’ve got access to lots of those at work.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.


10 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3935 posts in 1956 days


#1 posted 05-27-2014 06:57 PM

Typically a burn is caused by a dull bit, or a speed that’s to fast, or a router that’s moving to slow.. Spiral upcut bits are nice, but you might find a fuzzy edge around the groove, and if they are dull they burn just as much. A spiral downcut doesn’t leave the fuzz, but it clears chip much more slowly. Are the bits you’re using sharp? BTW, just a comment: most folks make those with a slightly rounded bottom because it’s a little easier to clean than a sharp, square bottom.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2312 days


#2 posted 05-27-2014 07:09 PM

I use a core box bit for the perimeter, and then go a bit deeper in one corner and add a triangular “well” where excessive liquids would accumulate, look in my projects, the top right corner is the “well”. Species of wood can make a difference, but mostly its as Fred said speed & sharpness.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

419 posts in 1008 days


#3 posted 05-27-2014 07:26 PM

I was wondering about the core box bit after reading Fred’s reply. That may be more what I’m after. I don’t think the bits I’m using are dull, unless they showed up dull because I think prior to using them on the cutting boards I’ve used them for about 6 linear feet of cutting total in the MDF top of the router table I built. Looks like Rockler sells those bowl cutting bits for about $40 and I’m thinking I might give one a shot.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2523 posts in 2900 days


#4 posted 05-27-2014 07:27 PM

Burning bit.. dull, or going too fast (sounds counter intuitive but faster burns), or you’re taking too much at a time.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

2526 posts in 1740 days


#5 posted 05-27-2014 07:54 PM

Maybe this will help….

1.) I don’t know how much material you are removing in one pass. You may be removing too much at a time so route in shallow passes….

2.) Route down to within say 1/32” (or around there) of the depth you want…Then the final pass remove that last 1/32” (or around there) and chances are it might be burn free

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1008 days


#6 posted 05-27-2014 08:02 PM

I’m not taking a whole lot of material as it is, maybe 1/16” or so. Dropping it down takes some effort to get the cutter to that depth.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1470 posts in 2101 days


#7 posted 05-27-2014 08:36 PM

I’m not very experienced with router stuff, but I have burned a board or two with a router. It’s inevitable that the bit gets hot. The slower you go, the more time the hot bit has to heat the wood. I have found that when I was feeding a board across the router table hand over hand, the burn marks were at the places where the board slowed down or stopped. Cutting less, using a sharper bit, feeding faster (up to a point) should equal less burn.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3935 posts in 1956 days


#8 posted 05-27-2014 09:26 PM

MDF is very hard on cutting edges, especially router bits. Depending on the brand, that 6’ may well have been enough to dull them.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

419 posts in 1008 days


#9 posted 05-27-2014 09:41 PM

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

2526 posts in 1740 days


#10 posted 05-27-2014 09:50 PM

What kind of wood are you using in your cutting boards ?

Woods like maple and cherry, for instance, are just prone to burning…..

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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