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dowel/tenon clearance question

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Forum topic by Belg1960 posted 05-27-2014 11:46 AM 534 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Belg1960

828 posts in 1790 days


05-27-2014 11:46 AM

Guys, I’m wondering when drilling or routing for loose tenons is it necessary to have some extra room at the end of the dowels/tenons? I made some doweled joints this weekend for a screen door and I guess because the glue had nowhere to go it blew out on one of my joints. I was able to save it but alot of extra work. Thanks Pat

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!


5 replies so far

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

641 posts in 1738 days


#1 posted 05-27-2014 03:05 PM

Pat—Having the holes the dowels go into a little deeper is good so none of the dowels bottom out and prevent the pieces from coming together.

The problem youʻre having with blowing out the joint is caused purely by hydraulics.

Dowels used for joints with glue should have grooves (straight the full length or spirial) to allow excess glue a place to go.

If you donʻt have these types of dowels, you can use a V-chisel to create grooves from one end to another…. at least 4 grooves. Another way is to slightly sand 2 flat spots on opposite sides of the dowels.

Hope this tip helps.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA

View neverenougftackle's profile

neverenougftackle

195 posts in 571 days


#2 posted 05-27-2014 04:12 PM

Bevel the top corners of your mating Mortice’s,—chisel. Giving a place for the glue to sit. Since these floating tenons joints are meant to be a tight fit, I don’t believe very much glue at all necessary, but spread evenly across to cover all surfaces.. Similar to the difference between clamping and non clamping a companion glue joint. It was/is always advisable to clamp and hold the wood tight for a good glue joint, not that much glue is needed.
An after though; is you glue a bit old, and has become too thick ?

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tyvekboy

641 posts in 1738 days


#3 posted 05-27-2014 04:46 PM

I agree with the previous reply as to the amount of glue needed in these type of joints.

Also rounding (chamfering) the ends of dowels as well as chamfering the ends of your tenons (or floating tenons) will also ease the assembly of the joint.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1378 posts in 908 days


#4 posted 05-27-2014 05:23 PM

+1 to chamfering the dowels/tenons, and for making the mortises a little deeper than the dowel/tenon.

I usually run a bead just on the edges of the mortise and an even amount on the tenon. It’s easy to over-glue the joint, which just makes a mess.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

828 posts in 1790 days


#5 posted 05-28-2014 10:18 AM

Thanks for the help guys. At least now I know the technical term for what went wrong. I was using spiral grooved dowels but I think my biggest mistake was squirting glue into the hole which was more than likely way too much glue.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

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