LumberJocks

Routing with a tall bit

  • Advertise with us

« back to Jigs & Fixtures forum

Forum topic by rrdesigns posted 05-27-2014 02:05 AM 730 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View rrdesigns's profile

rrdesigns

502 posts in 1904 days


05-27-2014 02:05 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jig

I want to make moulding for a shadow box that is 2 1/4” inches wide. I have found a bit to do the job but it requires pushing the bulk of the stock against the fence while only 3/4” is riding on the table. Featherboards help, but only at the bottom. I tried cutting it in stages, but as the profile gets closer to completion, it starts to rattle around and messes up the cuts as it loses its registration against the outfeed portion of the fence. Anybody know of a jig to help stabilize the piece as it is fed? I am working with 6 foot long stock.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs


16 replies so far

View tonybrews's profile

tonybrews

144 posts in 762 days


#1 posted 05-27-2014 02:56 AM

Rocker sells a stacked feather board system and it works well for me.

-- Tony, Colorado, tonybrews@comcast.net

View tonybrews's profile

tonybrews

144 posts in 762 days


#2 posted 05-27-2014 05:48 PM

There is a plan for a Router-table push-block in the Dec/Jan 2013/2014 issue of Wood magazine, and it looks like exactly what you need. (page 18) it is 9 1/2” tall, 8” wide, with an “L” bottom. Made of plywood and designed for maximum support of upright pieces!

-- Tony, Colorado, tonybrews@comcast.net

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

580 posts in 887 days


#3 posted 05-27-2014 06:02 PM

Glue it to another piece of wood (not nessecary 2 1/4 high) and after profiling saw it. Or do it without a featherboard and make a gutter.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View Loren's profile

Loren

7808 posts in 2366 days


#4 posted 05-27-2014 06:03 PM

It’s a bit hard to visualize but you may want to consider
gluing, clamping or screwing the moulding stock to
a “carrier board”. You can rip off the excess wood after
cutting the profile if you glue.

I made this comment thinking of a panel raising bit
but now I think you’re using a tall moulding bit. Gluing
a piece of scrap to the narrow edge to make the part
L-shaped would give you a bearing surface to push
down on. Again, you’d just rip it off when done.

The work can also be fed in between the fence and
the bit. This is a bit unorthodox and a solid featherboard
setup will be required. Feed direction will be opposite
to what you’re used to but of course the flat back of
the moulding will bear against the fence so tipping
won’t be an issue.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View rrdesigns's profile

rrdesigns

502 posts in 1904 days


#5 posted 05-27-2014 06:41 PM

@ Loren, I like your idea about gluing a scrap to the narrow edge. However, my bit is already close to the clearance available on my fence. I have no room to raise it up any higher. Maybe I need to build a fence with taller clearance for the bit and a channel to put a couple of featherboards to hold the stock down. Then I could use your glued on scrap idea with more featherboards in the slot on the table.

Your reverse procedure sounds interesting, albeit a little scary. Can you describe your solid featherboard set up in more detail?

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

View Loren's profile

Loren

7808 posts in 2366 days


#6 posted 05-27-2014 06:47 PM

I mean that the featherboards should be set up correctly. It’s
kind of a pain to do it right sometimes. Considering the
objective of a clean profile and minimized sanding, going
to the trouble will be worth it. Magnetic featherboards
are a lot quicker to set up but of course you need
a steel table to stick them to. Because the profile can’t
be cut in one pass, the featherboards will be pushing
against an irregular shape and this can make setting them
up more of a hassle.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View rrdesigns's profile

rrdesigns

502 posts in 1904 days


#7 posted 05-27-2014 06:53 PM

@Loren, I just realized I may have misunderstood. Is your glued on piece on top? That could potentially stop the tipping. And eliminate the need for a taller clearance fence. Or I could start with wider stock and cut it down after profiling.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

View tonybrews's profile

tonybrews

144 posts in 762 days


#8 posted 05-27-2014 07:25 PM

Is this what you need?

-- Tony, Colorado, tonybrews@comcast.net

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1283 posts in 791 days


#9 posted 05-27-2014 07:31 PM

Is there a way you can post the bit model or pic. There are many solutions, and sooo many moldings it would help me to help you to know what molding you are cutting. Many times I have built custom ‘catch’ fences to help run thin tall moldings. I also use stacked featherboards as well to hold a tall piece. In general any router table molding IMO is run with four feather boards. side and top, before and after the bit. The cradle suggested would likely also work.

Often times these tall moldings can also be run in a horz. router set up. Allowing the pressure to be on the wider surface. Just some thoughts, please post the profile.

-- Who is John Galt?

View Loren's profile

Loren

7808 posts in 2366 days


#10 posted 05-27-2014 07:32 PM

There would be many ways to approach it I think. I would
just try the one that seems the least trouble to set up
first.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1283 posts in 791 days


#11 posted 05-27-2014 07:36 PM

Tony That works great, unless his piece has most of the material taken at the top. sooo. rrdesigns it sounds like you should raise your fence height, then leave extra material at the top of your molding, to be ripped of after the pass. Then you could use the jig Tony shows as an outer fence, with feather board holing down from the Top. At 6’ I don’t see that design working well as a sled as pictured.

-- Who is John Galt?

View rrdesigns's profile

rrdesigns

502 posts in 1904 days


#12 posted 05-27-2014 08:24 PM

This is the bit I am trying to run. It is a Freud Molding Router Bit #402. I am going to try and start with wider stock to give the piece more registration against the fence after the profile is cut coupled with a stacked featherboard on both the
infeed and outfeed. Hopefully that will do the trick. Thanks for all the help, fellow LumberJocks.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 667 days


#13 posted 05-28-2014 02:05 AM

I have / use similar bits. I made a feather board from a 4×4. I run the piece through in 2 passes. The biggest thing I learned was to make extra pieces, run everything at once, and hold the material in a way that you can run it through nonstop. If you stop the odds are your piece will have a defect.
These are the lessons I’ve learned.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1283 posts in 791 days


#14 posted 05-29-2014 07:02 PM

  • Shawn Masterson* ” hold the material in a way that you can run it through nonstop. ” that brings to my mind, that when running moldings in my shop that I can’t run on the power feed, I do tend to use a two man set up, one person pushing and one pulling. Yes I am paying them to be here for me… but maybe you have some friends or something? Also +10 on extra pieces, and extra length.

-- Who is John Galt?

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 667 days


#15 posted 05-29-2014 09:37 PM

my RT top is 2’x4’. I try to run stock less than 6’. Anything over that and it gets challenging to hold the stock down to the top.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase