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Help With #5C Plane Identification

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Forum topic by kdc68 posted 05-26-2014 02:52 PM 1629 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kdc68

2526 posts in 1742 days


05-26-2014 02:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question plane

I picked up this #5C 14” jack plane cheap recently. The owner called it an unmarked student plane. Corresponding back and forth I didn’t question his identification, I figured he knew what it was.

I bought it cheap on a whim because I wanted a user and wasn’t concerned too much with anything else. I received it in the mail and am now curious with what it is.

I’m a novice (obviously) and don’t know enough to determine whether this is a genuine Stanley or a copy. I cannot find any identifiers on this plane anywhere except on the iron. The 2” iron says Stanley Made in the USA. I’m hoping the experts here can help.

Here’s some photos. If you need more I will take more and post them on request.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once


20 replies so far

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bandit571

14599 posts in 2148 days


#1 posted 05-26-2014 03:27 PM

Frog has alateral lever that says “Union”. Rear deck MIGHT have the number “5” cast on to it. It MIGHT have been that Stanley made this plane in the early 1920s after they bought out Union. Or, someone one put a replacement Stanley iron on the plane ( about like people today putting Hock blades on old planes)But, everything ellse on this #5 Jack plane is by Union

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1742 days


#2 posted 05-26-2014 03:48 PM

Thanks for the reply bandit. That’s more info than I knew before.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Deycart

444 posts in 1723 days


#3 posted 05-26-2014 04:06 PM

A picture of the back of the lever cap would help. Also remove the screw from the front knob and take a picture of the hardware. Is the depth adjuster (brass wheel) turn like a normal screw or is is backwards? Also a close up of the depth adjuster can tell us stuff. How long are the frog screws?

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1742 days


#4 posted 05-26-2014 04:06 PM

Couple more photos

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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bandit571

14599 posts in 2148 days


#5 posted 05-26-2014 04:16 PM

Yep, made either by Union Plane Co. or by Stanley after they bought out Union. Sometime around 1917-1920.

Note where the rivet is on the lateral lever. it is above the bearing, not below it. Union frog. Front knob is too.

Depth adjuster wheel should have right hand threads.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1742 days


#6 posted 05-26-2014 04:30 PM

Bandit and Deycart…hope this helps

Frog screws are 1/2”. Depth adjuster turned to the left retracts the iron, to the right advances the iron.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Deycart

444 posts in 1723 days


#7 posted 05-26-2014 04:33 PM

Yeah, I agree with bandit. The screw for the knob and the LH depth adjuster says Union to me. How ever I think it is a hybrid, just after Stanley bought them. Union used long brass nuts and had the name cast in the bed with a smooth lever cap. Later Union planes have your type of knob hardware and had “Union” cast in to the lever cap with a blank body.

The other possibility is that the lever cap was also replaced.

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1742 days


#8 posted 05-26-2014 04:36 PM

Bandit and Deycart.... Thank you both for helping this novice ! GREATLY appreciated !

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Don W

17969 posts in 2033 days


#9 posted 05-26-2014 09:59 PM

I’m going to agree on the union and add its probably after Stanley bought them based on the ring missing on the knob.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1742 days


#10 posted 05-26-2014 10:58 PM

Thanks Don !...
Is this a commonly found plane of this era and being unmarked ?

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Don W

17969 posts in 2033 days


#11 posted 05-26-2014 11:21 PM

I haven’t had many unions, but I’ve got a #3 just like it. I’m not sure if it was typical for Unions to be unmarked, or maybe it was one made for another reseller and was only marked on the cutter that wound up replaced.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1742 days


#12 posted 05-26-2014 11:38 PM

Don......Gotcha. I was hoping that maybe it was something unique or somewhat rare.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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JayT

4784 posts in 1676 days


#13 posted 05-27-2014 01:22 PM

Looks nearly identical to the one I cleaned up this weekend, right down to the knob and tote color and screws.

The difference is exactly what Don surmised—the iron on that one is stamped “HSB & Co” and “Revonoc”. If the iron is original, it would make it a private label plane made by Stanley/Union for the Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co hardware giant.

The only reason I have a pic is that the plane is on display in my cubicle. HSB started the True Value brand, which was later bought out by John Cotter to use as the brand for his hardware co-op. Wanna take a stab at what hardware brand my boss’s stores are under?

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1742 days


#14 posted 05-27-2014 01:45 PM

JayT.....Wow great looking plane !..... I think you inspired me to clean up mine as well …...

Edit: And thanks for the additional information….much appreciated

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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JayT

4784 posts in 1676 days


#15 posted 05-27-2014 01:55 PM

Thanks. I was shocked at how well it cleaned up. I found it at an estate/yard sale totally covered in rust and grime for $5. For that price, I figured maybe some of the parts would at least be usable. Didn’t even take a before pics because I thought it was going to be too much of a basket case to save in one piece. Imagine my surprise to find a totally complete plane with intact and undamaged wood and 95% japanning underneath.

It’s going back home with me tonight and will be turned into my primary cambered jack. I just brought it into work to show to the owner, as he loves the hardware history stuff—the family owned company I work for goes back to 1890.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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