LumberJocks

Looking for Hand Planes.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Trade & Swap forum

Forum topic by BrutalForce posted 05-24-2014 09:51 PM 950 views 0 times favorited 32 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View BrutalForce's profile

BrutalForce

41 posts in 946 days


05-24-2014 09:51 PM

I have found the love of wood working recently. For the last 2 years I have been collecting the used power tools necessary to size my own rough lumber, but then I learned that to actually work it (especially smaller items where accuracy is called for) I need some decent hand tools.

I have been stocking my tool chest with some new but mostly used tools. Unfortunately I live in Central Florida where we don’t have a ton of wood working stores or people selling off their tools. So I have to resort to either the one Woodcraft 50 miles round trip from here or CL/Ebay.

I have picked up already a good #4 Stanley, a Woodcraft Low angle Block Plane, and a Veritas Shoulder plane (owch!). I am looking to get a #7 and a #5 Stanley still in good condition with a price that won’t break the bank. Unfortunately the prices on Ebay are inflated grossly not to mention some people charging $25+ for shipping. I was hoping to find someone who has a #7 and a #5 for sale, that I could pick up for less than $50 each shipped. Also, I space out my tool purchases to 1 per paycheck.

If there is anyone here who can help me out, please send me a PM. I’d really appreciate it.


32 replies so far

View Deycart's profile

Deycart

384 posts in 915 days


#1 posted 05-25-2014 05:28 AM

I buy and sell planes on the regular. The 5 can be had for around 25 easy. You just need to look for someone who wants to end the auction at some weird time in the day like the morning or late night. They can go for even less if you are willing to do some work.

The 7 is going to be harder. I would recommend getting a 6 until you can save up for a good 7 or 8. Because that size has had some negative press you can get them for around 45-50$ The 7 will cost you around 70-80 for one that is ok, and you will want to probably get a really good 7 or 8 because you will want one that is actually flat. You will probably use the 6 more anyway and will end up wanting one after you get the 7. Most work can be done with a well tuned 6. Unless you are trying to join something longer than 4’ or so. Most projects will work fine with less.

View knotscott's profile (online now)

knotscott

5471 posts in 2033 days


#2 posted 05-25-2014 10:18 AM

You’ll get more opportunities by including some of the excellent models of the older Record and Millers Falls planes in your search too…..they’re definitely on par with the Stanley’s IMHO.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View BrutalForce's profile

BrutalForce

41 posts in 946 days


#3 posted 05-25-2014 10:38 AM

Thank you everyone for the tips and information. As for my choice of planes, it is based off of lots of reading and my knowledge of the planes I currently own. Since I own 3 different ones off 3 different brands you can see I am not dedicated to only one brand. If I was wealthy I would probably buy a complete. Set of LV or LN. Alas, I am not. However the tips here will have me looking at other brands as well.

View Don W's profile

Don W

15045 posts in 1225 days


#4 posted 05-25-2014 11:52 AM

I buy and sell as well. I sell as found and completely restored and tuned. https://timetestedtools.wordpress.com/tools-for-sale-2/

I agree with Doc. Finding a #7 for $50 including shipping, in good shape will be a good find.

Good luck in your search.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View BrutalForce's profile

BrutalForce

41 posts in 946 days


#5 posted 05-25-2014 12:15 PM

Would you agree that maybe I should consider a 6 over a 7 first? I am 5’6” and 170lbs. Also until now 4’ is probably the Max I will be flattening. If you agree, then a 6 before a 5, or a 5 first?

Let me add that I do have a 6” Craftsman Jointer and a 12 Delta planer, but I loathe the noise and the space they take up.

View JayT's profile

JayT

2280 posts in 868 days


#6 posted 05-25-2014 12:24 PM

I would agree with Deycart on all points. I use a #6 for the vast majority of jointing and flattening chores and really like it.

Which first depends on how you are buying and dimensioning lumber. If you need to do quite a bit of scrubbing off rough cut, taking out twist and planing to dimension, a cambered #5 jack is invaluable. If you are doing that work with machines or buying surfaced lumber and need to get glue ready joints and flatten glued up panels, then the #6 or 7 would get used more.

In other words, you will probably end up needing both, so get the one for your immediate projects and add the other later.

Edit: Just saw your addition. Learning to use hand planes makes it easy to do away with a power jointer, but you might consider keeping the planer around, at least for a while. Thicknessing lumber can be done with hand planes, and I’ve done it, but finally broke down and bought a lunchbox planer just to save some time on stock prep.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View Don W's profile

Don W

15045 posts in 1225 days


#7 posted 05-25-2014 12:24 PM

I love my #6 size. I use it a lot. For some reason I never understood, it probably one of the hardest sizes to resell. If 4’ is the max, you will find a #6 very useful.

The nice thing about #5s is they are common, and if patient can be found reasonable. I almost never use a #5 unless I’m doing rough work, which is what it’s designed for.

I would look for a #6 or 7 and grab the first deal you like. It’s my opinion if you’re going to be serous about using hand planes, you’ll eventually have both.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View BrutalForce's profile

BrutalForce

41 posts in 946 days


#8 posted 05-25-2014 12:30 PM

Well… I have found for production (breaking down large stock) that power tools is the way to go. As for accuracy and details hand tools seem to do the job as quickly and much cheaper without all the muss and fuss of setting up. Maybe I will start with a 6 and see how far that takes me.

I’ll be in touch with one of you guys on Friday and see what’s for sale.

Thank you.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15814 posts in 1524 days


#9 posted 05-25-2014 02:39 PM

I still see some good deals on Ebay. However, most of my hand planes I bought on Ebay but it was several years ago and the prices seemed to be a little lower then.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View BrutalForce's profile

BrutalForce

41 posts in 946 days


#10 posted 05-27-2014 02:10 AM

Just won a bid on a No. 6 that looks in decent shape for $24.50 the top of the tote is chipped off, so I will need to pick up a new tote at a later time, but now I will have a 6 and can use it for jointing. Thanks for the tips.

View Deycart's profile

Deycart

384 posts in 915 days


#11 posted 05-27-2014 02:16 AM

Great deal.
Don’t buy a new tote. Just repair it. There are numerous examples on lumberjocks and the net.

A Rosewood tote that has an excellent finish can go for more than your plane. Around 35 or so.

View BrutalForce's profile

BrutalForce

41 posts in 946 days


#12 posted 05-27-2014 02:19 AM

Thanks, I will see if i can find the examples. I didn’t even think about that. I hope I did good.

This is the culprit,

View JayT's profile

JayT

2280 posts in 868 days


#13 posted 05-27-2014 02:19 AM

Congrats, that should make a great user. It’s pretty easy to fix a tote where the horn is broken off. Here is a pretty good tutorial of the process. If you just want the plane to be a user, not a collector piece, you can use whatever wood you have handy to repair the tote. I’ve used walnut to do that repair on rosewood totes a couple times.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View Deycart's profile

Deycart

384 posts in 915 days


#14 posted 05-27-2014 02:22 AM

Looks like a solid plane. SW era or so. Large knob, Large Depth adjust no nickel. That’s a keeper!

View BrutalForce's profile

BrutalForce

41 posts in 946 days


#15 posted 05-27-2014 02:25 AM

Thanks for the Link JayT. Yeah, following that tutorial will make for an easy repair, just a little bit of TLC and it’ll be good as new. The seller said it was in good shape, I hope everything else is in decent shape. from the pics, the iron has a little bit of life still in it.

showing 1 through 15 of 32 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase