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Forum topic by MrRon posted 05-24-2014 09:48 PM 1348 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

3927 posts in 2711 days


05-24-2014 09:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

While reviewing the various 10” saw blades available at a reasonable price, I came up with the following:
Bosch 60T thin kerf made in Taiwan $48.32
Milwaukee 60T thin kerf made in Japan $43.97
Irwin/Marples 60T thin kerf made in Italy $42.97

Has anyone had a personal experience with any of these blades. I’m making an assumption that the “made in Japan” blades may be the best ones. All blades below this price point are made in China. How say thee?


14 replies so far

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

968 posts in 2533 days


#1 posted 05-24-2014 09:57 PM

Ron, I got a recommendation from one of the editors of Woodsmith, that they really like the Irwin/Marples and after buying one myself I have to say I’m really happy with it. I bought the 12” 98 tooth version for my mitersaw but I would assume the quality is consistant accross the brand. They had a 10” version on their tablesaw. Pat Just my 2 cents.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View thetinman's profile

thetinman

294 posts in 1006 days


#2 posted 05-24-2014 10:04 PM

Irwin as long as it is the Marples series. I tried to 50T combo based on a recommendation/review. Liked it so much bought the 60T. Smooth cuts. Less chips.

-- Life is what happens to you while you are planning better things -Mark Twain

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7226 posts in 2843 days


#3 posted 05-25-2014 12:08 AM

The Irwin Marples series gets very positive comments. I wouldn’t assume that the Japanese made blades are better….the Italian made blades are really good, and some seem to corner the market in value. Infinity, CMT, Freud, and Irwin Marples blades are all made in Italy, and are all very well regarded. I’d definitely include the Freud Diablo D1060X for ~ $42 on your list.

There are some really good US made closeouts currently available:
The 80T Oldham Pro 100PT80 is $20 + s/h….made in the USA, and is a fine blade at that price. Most modern Oldham blades are doo-doo IMHO, but this is a good blade.

The Delta Industrial 35-7657 40T ATB is also made in the USA, and is a great blade that happens to be on sale for $18 + s/h.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View jbartle's profile

jbartle

15 posts in 1513 days


#4 posted 05-25-2014 04:14 AM

Irwin Marple has been my preferred brand. I have several including the dado set, 60t, 40t, even one on my skill saw.
I think they are very good quality for the price.

View paxorion's profile

paxorion

1102 posts in 1513 days


#5 posted 05-25-2014 12:37 PM

Are you looking specifically for 60T blades? What material are you cutting? I use Freud Diablo and Irwin Marples blades (not the 60 tooth) and found lines to be very good performers.

-- paxorion

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2229 days


#6 posted 05-25-2014 02:43 PM

I can’t speak for those blades, however I LOVE my 12 ” dia. 96 carbide tooth blade I bought from Harbor Freight for $36. Runs true and leaves a almost polished cut. I have been using it for a year now. Best blade I have ever had!

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3927 posts in 2711 days


#7 posted 05-25-2014 04:04 PM

Right now I have Freud blades on my cabinet saw, RAS and miter saw. I am satisfied with them. I don’t think I will need any blade greater than 50 teeth. I have a HF dado set and it works well. I just made a small bookrack from melamine covered particle board and the dados were clean with no chipping. I have a Forrest WW II, but so many of the teeth are chipped that it would not pay to be re-tipped.

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1914 days


#8 posted 05-25-2014 04:20 PM

I used to always use thin kerf blades (Freud,Infinity) only because I was told the thin kerf blades are better than full kerf for lower HP table saws.
Well ,my saw has an old one horsepower motor on it so I never thought I should bother with a full kerf blade until I found a great deal on a Freud (LM72R010) 10’’ 24tpi Heavy Duty Ripping Saw Blade.

It has been the only blade I use in my table for ripping 2” thick Ash or Maple ,Oak is great,it cuts easily,the saw never bogs down because of the full kerf blade ,and the cuts are surprisingly smooth.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1189 days


#9 posted 05-25-2014 04:22 PM

I have several Freud D1040A thin kerf 40T blades that are made in Italy. I got them brand new at an auction for a song. They can be had for $35 – $45 typically. They work great as a combination blade, offer good quality crosscuts and can rip 12/4 hard maple as fast as I can push it through my table saw.

View JohnMcD348's profile

JohnMcD348

50 posts in 1065 days


#10 posted 05-26-2014 07:40 PM

Thanks for the recommendations all. I’m looking at buying a few different blades for my Table saw and something to put on my cheapo miter saw. Both 10”. I’m currently using the Irwin Marathon blades and haven’t been too upset on the results but I’m not doing any precision cutting either, it’s all been pretty much chop cutting for rough construction projects.

In the future though, I’d like to work on my skills and create projects that I’d be proud to show off to friends and family.

I will say, I’ve never heard of Oldham though, but I’m pretty new to this stuff.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3927 posts in 2711 days


#11 posted 05-26-2014 08:02 PM

You need to keep in mind that even an el cheapo saw blade from China will cut wood; not as smoothly as a Forrest, CMT, Freud or Tenyu, but well enough for most projects. Accuracy of cut is a function of saw construction and alignment. The best blade on a saw that is not aligned correctly is no more as good as a cheap blade on a fine machine. The difference between a cheap blade and an expensive blade is how well the carbide has been ground. I am in a unique position than most people. I can sharpen my own carbide saw blades. With that capability, I can take a cheap blade and sharpen it so it cuts almost as good as the expensive blades. There are other factors involved; the plate of a cheap blade might not be perfectly flat or there may not be enough carbide to grind. I would have to take this into account before deciding whether to sharpen or not.

JohnMcD348, Any blade you use will be fine until you begin doing projects that require clean cuts.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7226 posts in 2843 days


#12 posted 05-26-2014 09:31 PM

”...I’m currently using the Irwin Marathon blades and haven’t been too upset on the results but I’m not doing any precision cutting either, it’s all been pretty much chop cutting for rough construction projects….

...I will say, I’ve never heard of Oldham though, but I’m pretty new to this stuff.”

Stepping up to something like the Irwin Marples line (or comparable) from their Marathon line is likely to be a pretty pleasant experience.

Oldham used to an excellent brand, but their current lines are intentionally mediocre aimed at the larger lower end market. The Oldham Pro 80T linked above, is not part of their regular offerings….it appears to be a small run done in the same plant as the DeWalt Precision Trim series back when they were still made in the US. DW and Oldham were all part of the same parent company at the time those were made.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View JohnMcD348's profile

JohnMcD348

50 posts in 1065 days


#13 posted 05-27-2014 01:12 AM

Thanks.

What little I’ve learned recently about saw blades is from reading threads like this, a few articles in magazines and the varying books I’ve started collecting on woodworking and equipment.

I do notice, with the Marathon blade, it does produce less saw marks than the Porter Cable blade that came with my PC270TS. I think the Marathon blades are stamped blades whereas the Marples and Higher ends are cut? I also notice a bit of side to side movement difference between the two blades between my PC and the Marathon having less, but still noticeable. I would assume the higher end blades would cut better and be flatter

View Loren's profile

Loren

8315 posts in 3116 days


#14 posted 05-27-2014 01:26 AM

You might consider buying locally so returning a blade is
no big deal. I’m not that picky about general use
table saw blades but I will say for sure that you want
one with a flat plate. Tolerances may vary. The heat
from brazing carbide to a plate can distort it and
obviously if it’s not tensioned properly afterwards
it will never cut as nicely as it was designed to do.

I had a rather plain Craftsman saw blade sharpened by
Forrest once and it cut very well after that. I’m not
sure if I still have it but Forrest made it sharper than
new. They can/will also tune a blade flat for you –
it’s done on a machine by a skilled worker.

Check out ebay. You can search for saw blades by
adding a country name like “germany” to your search
and sometimes find real bargains on top-shelf blades
that lack name recognition in the states. The Germans
and Italians are like Japan, they don’t mess around
when it comes to machine tooling.

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