LumberJocks

Solid wood humidor

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by Sirgreggins posted 05-12-2014 04:00 PM 1598 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Sirgreggins's profile

Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1700 days


05-12-2014 04:00 PM

Hey guys,
My cousin works at a local cigar and smoke shop and his boss wants someone to make humidors for his business. I know most humidors are made of spanish cedar and are veneered but I’m curious about using solid wood for them. I would like to use cherry, walnut, or mahogany and use 1/4” spanish cedar as a liner. Any thoughts about these woods being used for humiodrs? Stable enough? I would be doing dovetail joints as they will lock everything together so that movement wont harm the integrity of the joints.


6 replies so far

View JonHitThingWithRock's profile

JonHitThingWithRock

97 posts in 1187 days


#1 posted 05-12-2014 04:53 PM

I built a humidor for a buddy for christmas, made the sides out of solid cherry, and did corner post dovetails with walnut and just lined the inside with about a quarter inch of spanish cedar. Also, back when i wasn’t a woodworker but was into cigars, I bought a $900 humidor made out of wenge and lined with a quarter inch of spanish cedar. So in short, yes, that will totally work, of course the obvious thing to remember is not to put any finish on the cedar, or anywhere where it can offgas into where the cigars are, I solved this by using a thin piece of cork on the top of the cedar lining between the main box and the top, the custom built one I bought had the lip of the cedar liner protruding about 1/8” above the top of the main box, either way will work, but cork is easier.

Jon

View Sirgreggins's profile

Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1700 days


#2 posted 05-12-2014 05:35 PM

Thanks Jon. Much appreciated!. I thnk im going to get a Porter cable 4212 dovetail jig so i can get perfect dovetails for multiple boxes. not to mention i can use it when i redo my kitchen and anything else i want dovetails when im doing multiple items.

View JonHitThingWithRock's profile

JonHitThingWithRock

97 posts in 1187 days


#3 posted 05-12-2014 06:42 PM

that’s one way to go, I splurged on an Incra Ts/Ls Supersystem and I do all my box joints and dovetails with it

View Sirgreggins's profile

Sirgreggins

298 posts in 1700 days


#4 posted 05-13-2014 08:35 PM

are there any woods to stay away from due to stability issues? maybe he’ll want an exotic but stability might not allow for it…

View JonHitThingWithRock's profile

JonHitThingWithRock

97 posts in 1187 days


#5 posted 05-14-2014 03:28 AM

I wouldn’t think so, due to all the glued joinery involved holding everything in place, but I’m far from a wood movement expert

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

732 posts in 2530 days


#6 posted 05-14-2014 02:30 PM

Been building humidors for years. I line my hardwood boxes with 5/16 or 3/8 Spanish cedar because they will take a mating joint better than 1/4. The lining allows you to go hog wild on the design of the box itself . Any solid wood will do from common domestics to high priced exotics. You can really dress us a simple box with some inlay, stringing or just a glued up pattern. Make sure to get a good fit between the lid lining and the box lining. I use a rule joint with one side on the lid and the other on the box. You can make various sizes and configurations and make dividers and trays for the inside with Spanish cedar too. Use good quality hinges (brusso, etc) and get a good humidification device to keep the puros at 70 degrees and 70% humidity. As was said, DONT seal the Spanish cedar lining. Make sure to use breathing protection as the Spanish Cedar dust can be a little irritating. YOU WILL HAVE A BLAST MAKING THESE. Almost any good basic corner joint (except butt) will do, if properly cut and assembled square. You can get fancier with dovetails or splined miters or miter joints with complementary different wood stringing. Start with some cheaper stock and practice, because lidded boxes can be tricky sometimes, and MUST be square. Most of my humidors have been commissions with varying price and size, so I established the customer’s budget before the design and construction. That way there are no surprises for anyone.. The hardware is where you will get into the cost with quality hinges, locks, handles, feet and humidification device and humidity gauge etc.. Work safely and have fun.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com