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Wood X legs angle help please!!!

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Forum topic by jscore08 posted 82 days ago 539 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jscore08

4 posts in 82 days


82 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: cedar milling joining modern tip question miter saw bandsaw clamp tablesaw

I am having trouble determining the angles of to make x legs for a wooden table base. I am using 4×4 cedar pieces and need to make x legs that are 37.5 inches tall and the top can be a maximum of 24 inches wide from edge to edge. I wondered if anyone has a formula or a way to determine what the top and bottom angles are so that the wood legs lock in to be those specs previously stated. My friend made these legs previously (in the picture) but the height and width were different. Any help or direction would be greatly appreciated.


14 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

4995 posts in 2317 days


#1 posted 82 days ago

To do it math-free create some full size templates and lay ‘em out to fit your specs. Once you’ve got them laid out mark your intersections on the templates and off you go.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

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Rick M.

3793 posts in 984 days


#2 posted 82 days ago

There was a thread about this a week or so ago and the gist is that the math is deceptively complicated. You are better off making a full size pattern as Mark suggests, drawing and measuring the angles, or lay them out using the materials and measuring the angles with a bevel gauge.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3638 posts in 1972 days


#3 posted 82 days ago

Ditto on what Rick said!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Rob's profile

Rob

251 posts in 1675 days


#4 posted 82 days ago

The math isn’t that difficult if you remember some basic trig (SOHCAHTOA) or the Pythagorean theorem (e.g., a 3-4-5 triangle), but personally I’d just whip it up in Sketchup and measure the angle with the protractor tool if I didn’t feel like flexing my math muscles.

View woodchuckerNJ's profile

woodchuckerNJ

868 posts in 238 days


#5 posted 82 days ago

Do the math…
But if you are too lazy or don’t know how.
Get some help by sketchup. Do the diagram in sketchup.
Then you have the dimensions.

BTW it’s

Asquared + B squared=c squared
you know A and B
You know the height, you now the width, the hypotenuse is the leg

-- Jeff NJ

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woodchuckerNJ

868 posts in 238 days


#6 posted 82 days ago

So I created a 1.5 ” leg
I don’t know why sketchup and calc don’t agree.
but I’ll let you work it out.

edit: ok, I know why the math doesn’t match. Because the math is based on a line, the sketchup is based on 1.5” leg
So 24-1.5 squared matches

-- Jeff NJ

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

3793 posts in 984 days


#7 posted 82 days ago

ok, I know why the math doesn’t match. Because the math is based on a line, the sketchup is based on 1.5” leg

Exactly, it’s more complicated than simple Pythagoras.

The angle for 4” wide stock will be 55° (rounded). If it’s really 3.5” stock then the angle will be different.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

1910 posts in 473 days


#8 posted 82 days ago

Thickness matters. You need to know the rate of the top/bottom cut. (Length of the cut). Not knowing angles means it’s more difficult to know the rate of the cut. You need to figure the 37” rise, (a constant because we’ve seen in the photo that the top and bottom cut are parallel to the floor and each other) and the 24” width MINUS the rate of the cut. (Once, not twice. Then you are effectively working the center of the board, and the angles of the theoretical centerline are the same as the edge). But wait…. There’s more.

We only figured the top and bottom cuts…. Right? What about the angles at the intersection? Subtract from 90? Nope.

Multiply times 2 then subtract from 180.

-- Bucket, any person that spends 10k on a bicycle is guaranteed to be a $@I almost started to like you. -bhog

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Rick M.

3793 posts in 984 days


#9 posted 81 days ago

I’ve never heard the term “rate of cut” used in that context, is that a carpentry phrase? I googled the phrase and the only usage I could find meant feed rate or blade speed. Not arguing (can’t always tell on the internet), just curious.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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Buckethead

1910 posts in 473 days


#10 posted 81 days ago

It is just what I have heard it called in the framing world here in Florida. It may be absolute bunk. Southern professional carpentry is often lacking in tradition and terminology.

-- Bucket, any person that spends 10k on a bicycle is guaranteed to be a $@I almost started to like you. -bhog

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1942 posts in 881 days


#11 posted 81 days ago

Rick M.
I’ve never heard the term “rate of cut” used in that context, is that a carpentry phrase?
v

Bucketheads first sentence answers your question….

Thickness matters. You need to know the rate of the top/bottom cut. (Length of the cut)......

Edit: nevermind he posted as I was cutting and pasting…lol

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

3793 posts in 984 days


#12 posted 81 days ago

@kdc, “Bucketheads first sentence answers your question….”

It would if my question had been, ‘what does it mean;’ but that wasn’t my question. I was just curious if it was a term from some particular industry.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1942 posts in 881 days


#13 posted 81 days ago

Rick M.
Gotcha….my apologies…

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Rick M.

3793 posts in 984 days


#14 posted 80 days ago

Think nothing of it. Hope your weekend is full of woodworking!

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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