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The Ultimate Router Jig Thread

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Forum topic by thedude50 posted 05-06-2014 06:22 AM 1992 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


05-06-2014 06:22 AM

OK We all know when it comes to versatility and bang for your buck the router is the king of the shop. From Mortise Jigs to Multi Routers to the Woodrat to the Leigh dovetail Jig to the cheep homemade circle jig the router is so versatile and what makes it so Jigs Jigs Jigs. So wither you built your favorite Jig or you bought it tell us all about it show us pictures and give us the low down on a great tool in your shop.

My Favorite Router Jigs are the Keller Dovetail Jig and the Woodrat both the 900 and the 600 are great tools for your shop I am also fond of the Multi Router a great jig and then of coarse my router table here are a few Photos of some of my Favorite Jigs and a look at one of my favorite Jigs the Woodrat.

WoodRat WR600

Smaller in size and more affordable, the WoodRat WR600 is the little brother to the WoodRat WR900. With only a few limitations, it is every bit as high quality as its bigger brother. This tool could evolve your shop into a high performance work center.

We began this review several months ago while we were testing dovetail jigs. The problem we had at the time was that this machine is so much more than just a dovetail jig. In fact it’s not really a jig at all, this machine is so revolutionary that it could possibly make the router the single most versatile tool in the shop all by itself.

When reviewing tools objectively, you’re not supposed to fall in love with them. Instead the goal is to evaluate them on their merits, test scientifically and form an opinion regarding overall quality and functionality. In this case, the resulting positive opinion was obvious. Next, is it a shop necessity? I must confess my shop would never be the same without the WoodRat WR600. To ensure more objectivity I ran through several tests again making dovetails, mortises, tenons, box joints and also edge routed sliding dovetails producing approximately 60 different joints in all. It is no wonder there are few extensive reviews done on the WoodRat due to the fact that it is impossible to force it into any single category. Because of its versatility, the WoodRat is easily the most adaptable tool in the shop and I confess to liking it very much. Reviewing the WoodRat is a difficult challenge because it does so many jobs so well. At the beginning we got it to test as a dovetail jig. At the time we were testing Keller, PORTER-CABLE, and Leigh. Each one of these dovetail jigs had their merits. However none of them performed as well as the WoodRat. The WoodRat allows the user to make half blind dovetails, through dovetails, blind dovetails, and sliding dovetails. It is only limited by your skill and imagination as a joint maker. If you do not know how to make a joint you must learn to do that first in order to perform the task on the WoodRat. In other words the WoodRat is not a magic bullet that will make you a better woodworker if you lack skills. That fact not withstanding and even if it may involve some hard work, the rewards are enormous.

One of the greatest things about the WoodRat is its ability to make many types of dovetails. We were able to easily perform the task of through dovetails during this test, simply done on the WR 600. With the use of the parallelogram, you simply lay out the dovetail marking the starting and ending points with a pencil on the frame of the WoodRat WR600. You track the with the crank, slide the router on the guides and now you have beautiful through dovetails. It’s actually so simple that it’s scary. As long as one does not get caught up in trying to measure everything the WoodRat performs flawlessly. When one tries to become the master of measurements one will undoubtedly run into problems. Now you may ask yourself how the WoodRat could work without measuring and the answer is because you laid it out using the parallelogram to the width of the blank. You could even leave one whole dovetail out and it will make no difference on your joint. It will still look nice and gives you enough versatility to mimic hand cut work. While you can cut any of these joints on the WoodRat with a bit from any manufacturer, WoodRat stands alone in using high quality high-speed steel router bits made to their own specifications. You’re going ask yourself why in this world of tungsten carbide tipped bits, anyone would make high-speed steel router bits for use today? The answer is simple, HSS bits can be sharpened to a much finer edge. Also, because they are engineered from a single piece of steel HSS bits can be crafted to match the shape of a traditional hand cut dovetail, even at miniature sizes. TCT bits are useful for working down the grain. We also found half blind dovetails were a fairly simple task on the WR600. It did not disappoint in any way, the ease of setup is remarkable.

Next we tested mortise and tenon joints. The WoodRat does these with ease. You can even install the mortise rail add-on and make multiple mortises on projects like Mission style tables, beds, or chairs. You can make tenons that are square and round so you have the choice of speed or tradition. After using this wonderful tool for over a year we were finally masters of the machine. We could do any joint with it and they are all worthy of fine furniture.

We were pleasantly surprised when we received a call from Martin Godfrey, the designer and owner of WoodRat letting us know of a new development. He wanted me to test the new Pathfinder jig that would revolutionize the daily use of what has become my favorite router tool in the shop. I spent another month working with and mastering the Pathfinder, and found that it has unlimited potential for making any joint by simply following the template. That’s right, you read that correctly, the templates that were included gave me mortise and tenon joints as well as all types of dovetails. You can do almost anything on this machine and with a vastly reduced set up time. What is even cooler, you can copy any joint in minutes rather than hours. The setup is simple.

The only question this review should leave you with is not whether you should purchase a WoodRat WR600, but whether you choose the WR600 or the WR900. I know I am saving up for my second rat. I want to get a WR900 and set it up to do just dovetails. This would allow me to leave the WR600 set up for mortises.

One more thing on the Pathfinder, if you have great ideas for a template to make other shapes or joints, you can have them made on any CNC machine or put the shape into the blank template, and they will work perfectly.

In Conclusion I would give the WoodRat our highest rating of 5 stars on my star scale. It is truly the finest router machine made today. I will choose to have no less than the original WoodRat WR600 in my shop.

Or this Classic WoodRat WR600

Smaller in size and more affordable, the WoodRat WR600 is the little brother to the WoodRat WR900. With only a few limitations, it is every bit as high quality as its bigger brother. This tool could evolve your shop into a high performance work center.

We began this review several months ago while we were testing dovetail jigs. The problem we had at the time was that this machine is so much more than just a dovetail jig. In fact it’s not really a jig at all, this machine is so revolutionary that it could possibly make the router the single most versatile tool in the shop all by itself.

When reviewing tools objectively, you’re not supposed to fall in love with them. Instead the goal is to evaluate them on their merits, test scientifically and form an opinion regarding overall quality and functionality. In this case, the resulting positive opinion was obvious. Next, is it a shop necessity? I must confess my shop would never be the same without the WoodRat WR600. To ensure more objectivity I ran through several tests again making dovetails, mortises, tenons, box joints and also edge routed sliding dovetails producing approximately 60 different joints in all. It is no wonder there are few extensive reviews done on the WoodRat due to the fact that it is impossible to force it into any single category. Because of its versatility, the WoodRat is easily the most adaptable tool in the shop and I confess to liking it very much. Reviewing the WoodRat is a difficult challenge because it does so many jobs so well. At the beginning we got it to test as a dovetail jig. At the time we were testing Keller, PORTER-CABLE, and Leigh. Each one of these dovetail jigs had their merits. However none of them performed as well as the WoodRat. The WoodRat allows the user to make half blind dovetails, through dovetails, blind dovetails, and sliding dovetails. It is only limited by your skill and imagination as a joint maker. If you do not know how to make a joint you must learn to do that first in order to perform the task on the WoodRat. In other words the WoodRat is not a magic bullet that will make you a better woodworker if you lack skills. That fact not withstanding and even if it may involve some hard work, the rewards are enormous.

One of the greatest things about the WoodRat is its ability to make many types of dovetails. We were able to easily perform the task of through dovetails during this test, simply done on the WR 600. With the use of the parallelogram, you simply lay out the dovetail marking the starting and ending points with a pencil on the frame of the WoodRat WR600. You track the with the crank, slide the router on the guides and now you have beautiful through dovetails. It’s actually so simple that it’s scary. As long as one does not get caught up in trying to measure everything the WoodRat performs flawlessly. When one tries to become the master of measurements one will undoubtedly run into problems. Now you may ask yourself how the WoodRat could work without measuring and the answer is because you laid it out using the parallelogram to the width of the blank. You could even leave one whole dovetail out and it will make no difference on your joint. It will still look nice and gives you enough versatility to mimic hand cut work. While you can cut any of these joints on the WoodRat with a bit from any manufacturer, WoodRat stands alone in using high quality high-speed steel router bits made to their own specifications. You’re going ask yourself why in this world of tungsten carbide tipped bits, anyone would make high-speed steel router bits for use today? The answer is simple, HSS bits can be sharpened to a much finer edge. Also, because they are engineered from a single piece of steel HSS bits can be crafted to match the shape of a traditional hand cut dovetail, even at miniature sizes. TCT bits are useful for working down the grain. We also found half blind dovetails were a fairly simple task on the WR600. It did not disappoint in any way, the ease of setup is remarkable.

Next we tested mortise and tenon joints. The WoodRat does these with ease. You can even install the mortise rail add-on and make multiple mortises on projects like Mission style tables, beds, or chairs. You can make tenons that are square and round so you have the choice of speed or tradition. After using this wonderful tool for over a year we were finally masters of the machine. We could do any joint with it and they are all worthy of fine furniture.

We were pleasantly surprised when we received a call from Martin Godfrey, the designer and owner of WoodRat letting us know of a new development. He wanted me to test the new Pathfinder jig that would revolutionize the daily use of what has become my favorite router tool in the shop. I spent another month working with and mastering the Pathfinder, and found that it has unlimited potential for making any joint by simply following the template. That’s right, you read that correctly, the templates that were included gave me mortise and tenon joints as well as all types of dovetails. You can do almost anything on this machine and with a vastly reduced set up time. What is even cooler, you can copy any joint in minutes rather than hours. The setup is simple.

The only question this review should leave you with is not whether you should purchase a WoodRat WR600, but whether you choose the WR600 or the WR900. I know I am saving up for my second rat. I want to get a WR900 and set it up to do just dovetails. This would allow me to leave the WR600 set up for mortises.

One more thing on the Pathfinder, if you have great ideas for a template to make other shapes or joints, you can have them made on any CNC machine or put the shape into the blank template, and they will work perfectly.

In Conclusion I would give the WoodRat our highest rating of 5 stars on my star scale. It is truly the finest router machine made today. I will choose to have no less than the original WoodRat WR600 in my shop.

Some of the best things in woodworking are old ideas and this is true of most hand tools and how to use them. The art has often gone backwards and has struggled to retain its high level of impressive artisan ship from the past. However in the world of power tools, the reverse is mostly true. The world is full of cheap crappy tools lacking in performance, quality and safety, but better tools are out there also. If a guy wants to buy a great tool today, fences, motors and safety are generally a vast improvement to the past and most are better engineered,but some new tools are simply junk while others are far superior to yesterday’s best. So buyer be ware.

Now going back about forty some years to 1976 a woodworker named David Keller developed an ingenious little jig for cutting dovetails with a router. The Jig is only for through dovetails but it’s elegantly simple. The Keller Dovetail jig was revolutionary and has earned a place in my shop. Even though I have jigs that are more versatile and that will do half blind, blind and sliding dovetails,the Keller Jigs key feature is ease of use, repeatable quality and speed that are unmatched by any other Dovetail Jig, and its been this way since 1976. I have had the Keller 1601 in my shop since 1995 and use it every single week. I mostly use it to make my drawer boxes and other boxes. The Keller 1601 is simple and sometimes simple is the best way to go. Another use for the Keller system is for box joints, capable of producing some of the best box joints that can be made and they are faster than doing it on the table saw.

Here is how the system works: There are two 16 inch templates that are each screwed to shop supplied backer boards. You simply clamp the project tails board to the backer board with the template positioned over the end grain. Set the dovetail bit depth deep enough to accommodate the thickness of the adjoining “pins”board. You can either put the board in a vise and rout or you can flip the board over and use your router table to rout the tails. Once your done routing all your tails you switch bits and templates. The second part is so easy,you just mount the pins board vertically in your vise, place the tails board you just cut over the end of the pins board with the tails over the end grain of the pins board and scribe one of the tails into the end grain with a marking knife. Line up the pins template exactly over the scribe marks and clamp the project board to the backer board. Set the straight pattern bit depth deep enough to accommodate the tails board thickness and rout out the waste.

Be sure to check out the new video below on the Keller Dovetail Jig and its use so you can see how simple this jig is to use. This timeless idea is simply the best for ease of use, accuracy, no test cuts, no wasted materials and an extremely easy learning curve. Two manufacturers using this system are Keller and the Wood Rat, so it’s not a surprise they are two of my favorite jigs. The first time I used the Keller Dovetail jig was in 1977 in high school wood shop. Mr. Davi introduced the Keller and said it was a game changer that would enable the small shop to compete with the commercial shop. Mr. Davi was right, you can get the look of hand cut dovetails in a fraction of the time. At under $300 the Keller 1601 and a full set of bits is all the small shop needs to compete with the big shop. Once set up and ready to go with all the blanks you can do close to 25 drawer boxes in one hour which would not be a bad days work. I give the Keller 4.5 stars out of 5 The only downfall to this jig is its fixed spacing which you can play with a bit if you work at it

So No Matter What what Jig you love show it to us and tell us why you love it and what makes it so cool.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech


16 replies so far

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2859 posts in 1929 days


#1 posted 05-06-2014 05:23 PM

Very true about the versatility of the router and the need for jigs to obtain that versatility. I build large scale locomotives and need to make spoked drivers about 8” diameter. I have designed jigs to make those drivers. With a well made jig, I can make many drivers and they will all be identical. I don’t save the jigs. I make them for each size driver I need. When I’m designing my projects on Autocad, I also do the jig at the same time. My 60 years engineering background has served me well. Some engineers are 9-5 engineers. I’m a full time engineer. It is a normal part of my life.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4341 posts in 1734 days


#2 posted 05-06-2014 05:34 PM

MrRon, I would be interested to see some of your work on LJ.

-- Bert

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#3 posted 05-07-2014 09:09 AM

any photos mr ron

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2859 posts in 1929 days


#4 posted 05-07-2014 07:52 PM

I’m currently building a box joint jig for the Bosch box joint set. This will be a “keeper” as I’m using metal parts for accuracy and long life. Will finish it in a few days; I will post a picture then.

I use jigs all the time, but they are mostly “one off” jigs to produce identical parts. Once done, they usually get scrapped.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2859 posts in 1929 days


#5 posted 05-07-2014 08:08 PM

The first picture is of a resaw fence for a bandsaw. The next is for router surfacing a large surface. In this case, 42”x96”.

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thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#6 posted 05-10-2014 03:56 AM

Thanks for the post

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2859 posts in 1929 days


#7 posted 05-12-2014 08:04 PM

I just finished this box joint jig. It works only with the Freud box joint set. 1st picture front view shows spacer key and interchangeable 3/8” finger; (1/4” finger installed)
2nd picture rear view
3rd picture bottom view showing runners and non-friction UHMW strips

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thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#8 posted 05-14-2014 08:11 AM

Very Cool MR Ron Not a router jig but really cool.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2859 posts in 1929 days


#9 posted 05-14-2014 04:47 PM

I must be losing my mind. “Router” not table saw.

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thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#10 posted 05-20-2014 05:53 AM

its okay I like the jig and it is something a good shop should build do you have any router Jigs ? Here is a reprint from my Website On another great ROUTER jig

When we first received a CRB7 Daniel and I worked the tool out a great deal and Daniel wrote a great review of the M Power CRB7. About a year later the CRB7 MKII was released and it actually fit more routers than the original. Below you will find Daniels review of the Original and the MKII. Today I am very happy to inform you that we are testing the CRB7 MK3, the latest and the best CRB7 so far. One of my favorite uses for the CRB7 is using it as an electric version of a router plane. The extra-large base lets you flatten the bottom of a half lap, wide notches or large hinge mortises. The joints on my workbench were made much easier than they could have been before I got the CRB7.

Now feature packed, the MK3 has a great edge guide that works like a fence on the base. Also they have added a large circle cutter that makes cutting large circles a breeze. The new fence is great for trenching out a dado. Originally the CRB7 would perform 7 unique tasks but I now count close to 20 functions I can do with the base. You can still flush edge trim and you can clearly do dados, rebates and mortises. There are simply so many tasks you can do with the CRB7 MK3 that are above the advertised features, you would be able to invent new tasks as the need arises. The jig is my personal favorite I use it daily and I will continue to find new uses for the MK3. The CRB7 MK3 is the best CRB7 so far and the legend grows. We are currently filming the CRB7 MK3 to post soon. Keep your eyes peeled for more videos as we move more reviews to that medium.

Here is Daniel’s review on the CRB7. It is a well written and informative review:

M-Power has produced many excellent tools so it was a privilege to test their brand new CRB-7 Combination Router Base. Assembling the CRB-7 was easy as there are very few pieces to put together. Attaching the base plate to the selection of routers in my shop couldn’t be easier. Using the router’s horizontal mounting holes (shown here), makes the variety of routers able to utilize the CRB-7 a large list to be sure.

Made from steel and high impact plastic the CRB-7 is built to last. Changing the configuration of the router base is also very simple and can be accomplished with very little work. The micro-adjust wheel allows you to carefully set the distance in very small increments. I have always had affection for tools that can multi-task and the CRB-7 is just such a tool. The CRB-7 has 7 basic functions; the M-Power website lists them as follows:

The CRB-7’s main tool functions:

Adjustable Dado-ing or Trenching with a clamp guide – Set the clamp guide once and adjust the position of the router via the CRB7’s Micro Adjuster. The CRB7 increases router to clamp guide surface contact area and reduces clamp guide set up time –eliminating it in some cases.
Adjustable Mortising –a unique feature that allows “Centered and Off Centered” mortises plus you can decide on and precisely control the actual width of the mortise.
Anti Tilt Support –Another first, variable height triangulated stabilization –Usually most of the router base remains unsupported when edge routing – CRB Anti tilt leg eliminates router tilt especially important when routing work-pieces with a high aspect ratio.
Compass – Route precision circles and holes that are actually smaller than the base of the router – CRB can route circles and wheels from: ¾”to 8-¾”radius (19 to 225mm). That is diameters ranging 1-½”to 17-½”(38 to 450mm) with a ¼”or 6mm straight router cutter.
Off Set Base Plate – Increases overall router stability –reducing errors when edge molding by more than doubling the surface contact area between router and work piece. CRB also moves the pivot hand guiding the router toward the centre of the panel smoothing out the router pass action and reducing the chance of burn marks.
Adjustable false panel rebate copier – The CRB provides a simple and exceptionally quick way of accurately repeating a molded dado for production batch quality faux or false paneling.
Flush Trim Lipping Kit – With virtually no set up time – quick fit the Trim Jig riser pad to accurately machine trim hard wood and iron on lipping flush with the core board in seconds. (requires accessory kit)

Next you can see the features that M-Power lists on their webpage.

CRB-7’s tool features:

One Time Set Up –Set up the CRB7 to fit your favorite router just once with a set of 4 x injection molded shims and 4 sets of screws – job done
Quick Change –Unlike most router jigs, CRB can be fitted/removed in less than 10 seconds, with no fiddly screws or cantering jigs required.
Micro Adjuster –High precision router cutter position can be attained and repeated using the knurled and indexed micro adjuster.
2” Bakelite Ball Handle –Ergonomic design, comfortable to the touch, allowing for easy hours of consecutive use.
Indexed Rule –The self adhesive Imperial/Metric rule is another feature to ensure fast easy readings of router cutter position.
2 Section Anti Tilt Leg – Supports and stabilizes the router, when routing materials varying in thickness from 3/8”to 3-1/4”- (10mm to 82mm). The 2 leg sections accommodate combinations of router position and work piece thickness.
Magnetic Pivot Pin Storage –A no-lose home for this essential component, safe and easily accessible when ever needed.
Professional Grade Build –Made in England the CRB is manufactured to the highest standards including a hard anodized machined solid aluminum bridge. Laser cut 5mm thick acrylic base plate and precision turned steel and brass components.
2 Year Guarantee –Our extended guarantee is testimony to the build quality of the CRB and ensures our customers can buy in confidence.

One of the first configurations I tested was making the CRB-7 an edge shaping jig. An excellent feature of the base is the adjustable leg that lends support to the offset side of the base plate. Adjusting the leg is a simple matter of turning one bolt. Once adjusted the leg easily holds the router level while it cuts. Typically used for edge cutting this configuration is just one in the CRB-7’s repertoires.

Setting up the CRB-7 as a small circle cutter is simple. It is just a matter of attaching a pin to the base then adjusting the distance of the bit from the center pin, then you are able to cut a circle ranging from 1-½”to 17-½”(38 to 450mm) with a ¼”or 6mm shank straight cutting router bit. I made several circular cuts in a variety of sizes and each time the CRB-7 made the cuts smooth and accurate, the whole while keeping the router steady and eliminating the risk of tipping and ruining the cut. The center pin has a magnetic hole on the side of the frame for storage.

Another useful configuration is as an offset router base. It is a simple base that will easily follow a guide clamp to produce dados or other similar cuts like false panel cuts across any width you need. The router cut was kept very straight and the CRB7 made the side that rides along the guide much wider then the typical router base alone. At just under 11”, as opposed to just the round edge of the typical base plate, the CRB-7 gives you much needed stability in your routing.

Next I set up the CRB-7 as a mortise cutter. I was able to precisely adjust the size and depth of the joint to exactly how I wanted it. Using this same configuration you can also cut rabbits (or rebates as our friends across the pond call them). Again the stability of the elongated edge guide and the support of the adjustable leg make these cuts a breeze.

The investment for the CRB-7 is only $80.00 so it is not too hard on the wallet.

With the attachment of the CRB-7’s edge guide (sold separately for $30.00), you are able to make cuts along an edge with measurements as follows:

Edging width maximum 15mm (19/32”) with bearing Edging width maximum 25mm (63/64”) without the bearing Edging projection maximum 5mm (13/16”) Router bit diameter a maximum of 25mm (63/64”)

(Got to love the metric system)

So over all I liked working with the CRB-7. After the redesign of the rod width adjustment feature I was able to fit the base to more routers making the base far more useful. If I should get hold of the extended rod accessory, I will write an addendum at the bottom of this article.

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View Marv88's profile

Marv88

40 posts in 585 days


#11 posted 05-29-2014 02:41 AM

I cut many different size circles regularly (I build home/auto speaker cabinets and speaker baffles/adapters “on the side”) and have made several circle jigs over the years however this one is the quickest at setting up without having to measure and has excellent dust collection with the PC 890 plunge router. It has a range of about 2 1/2” to 28” depending on which hole I use/which way I orient the sliding pivot pin assembly and that can easily be extended by making a longer pin assembly (since the pics I have added an English/metric tape since a lot of the speaker specs I get are metric).

-- "Post count on a forum does not denote level of knowldege, skill nor experience"

View redSLED's profile

redSLED

687 posts in 578 days


#12 posted 05-29-2014 12:48 PM

Oh boy, this is going to be a good thread. I am watching for amazing pictures of jigs made by people who are smarter than me.

-- Perfection is the difference between too much and not enough.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6948 posts in 1600 days


#13 posted 05-29-2014 02:17 PM

Made this horizontal router-based mortising machine about 2-1/2yr ago. IMO, floating tenons are the way to go.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/56897

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1163 days


#14 posted 05-30-2014 03:22 AM

Both nice Router Jigs I have been meaning to make one of those mike but I have two woodrats and dont know if it will do something I cant with the rat

That circle jig is sick do you have a sketch up of the plan

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View Marv88's profile

Marv88

40 posts in 585 days


#15 posted 05-30-2014 02:52 PM

Thanks! I built that on the fly from ideas in my head so I don’t have an actual plan for it however I’ve been meaning to try my hand at sketch up and if I get the hang of it I’ll post a plan.

-- "Post count on a forum does not denote level of knowldege, skill nor experience"

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