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DeWalt DW735 "streaks" on wood

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Forum topic by Matt Przybylski posted 05-05-2014 02:35 PM 1451 views 1 time favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Matt Przybylski

528 posts in 1842 days


05-05-2014 02:35 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planing dewalt dw735

Hey everyone,
I have a DeWalt DW735 and it’s a very reliable machine. I have, however, noticed that I sometimes see what look like streaks on wood after planing. I’ll attach an image, but from what I can gather it looks like some of the chips that accumulate on the beds during planing get “pressed” into the wood during the feed and create these, at least that’s what I think is going on. My DW735 is hooked up to a Thien separator which is hooked up to the HF 2HP DC. I do get some chips that land on the beds but I figured that’s just par for the course when planing. I know that the DW735 has its own chip ejection but from what I’ve read you can still hook it up to a DC and it shouldn’t be an issue.

Any ideas on what I can do to get rid of this problem? I mean, I’m still sanding afterwards, but I’d like the wood to be a bit better looking coming out of the planer than what I’m seeing right now.

Please see the lighter colored portions on the image below. The right piece with the two “eyes” and just to the bottom of the right eye is where you can most see it as well as on the bottom side of the board. This was planing cherry on the dimensioning setting of the DW735 and pretty light passes being taken.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com


17 replies so far

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GrandpaLen

1643 posts in 1737 days


#1 posted 05-05-2014 03:28 PM

If that’s a raised ridge you may have a nick in the blades. If that’s the problem, you can loosen one blade and shift it to the right or left, if this helps but doesn’t completely solve the ridge problem, loosen one of the other blades and shift it in the opposite direction.

...just a thought.

Best Regards. – Len
Work Safely and have fun.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1741 days


#2 posted 05-05-2014 03:31 PM

+1 GrandpaLen….

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View Matt Przybylski's profile

Matt Przybylski

528 posts in 1842 days


#3 posted 05-05-2014 03:32 PM

Hey Len,
Apologies but maybe the image and description was a bit hard to decipher. I’ve modified the photo outlining what I’m referring to. It’s not raised and it’s not continuous. It’s almost as if its a small dent in the wood, actually, though its rather light, but it does definitely affect the color where it “dented” the wood. I don’t know how best to explain it :\

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1741 days


#4 posted 05-05-2014 03:44 PM

Might be debris on the feed rollers…??... To repair you wood if it is a dent (and not tearout) you can raise the wood fibers with a damp rag and an iron. Place the damp rag over the dent and apply the iron over the damp rag….sometimes it helps to place a droplet of water in the dent….I do this all the time with a temp setting on the iron set for cotton….your iron setting may vary

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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Matt Przybylski

528 posts in 1842 days


#5 posted 05-05-2014 03:46 PM

I think that’s exactly what it is, debris on the feed rollers, but during a long planing session I’d like to alleviate that somehow and make it stop doing that so I don’t have to go through all my boards and iron them out. Is there something I can put on the rollers or some other solution that would help combat this from happening?

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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kdc68

2526 posts in 1741 days


#6 posted 05-05-2014 03:52 PM

I periodically check my planer for debris on the rollers and clean with mineral spirits….right or wrong I don’t know but thats what I do….maybe somebody will reply with a better alternative than using mineral spirits….

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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GrandpaLen

1643 posts in 1737 days


#7 posted 05-05-2014 03:55 PM

Well that could very well be caused by errant chips which flipped back onto the board and were then pressed in by the feed rollers. You can steam the dent and probably raise it back level. The color variation, on the other hand, is a mystery.
Spritz the area with water and see what that lighter spot looks like, and would look like after it has a finish coat on it….assess, adapt, recover. ;-) good luck.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

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Matt Przybylski

528 posts in 1842 days


#8 posted 05-05-2014 04:05 PM

Thanks guys, both of these make sense. I’ll keep a close eye on the rollers to see if they have debris stuck on them or if the chips are flipping back onto the wood (which would definitely make sense since like I said earlier there are a lot of chips being put back onto the beds as well). Appreciate the feedback.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#9 posted 05-05-2014 04:57 PM

I get the same thing with my 733. I believe that it is chips coming back around. Seems to happen more with sappy woods. It is a clue to me to clean the rollers with mineral spirits as kdc68 mentioned. May help to clean the knives too as they may get pitch build up on them while planing conifers.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1537 days


#10 posted 05-05-2014 05:41 PM

It sounds like you have a good dust collection set up, but I have had problems in the past with ‘back pressure’ on the 735. When running into a 2 1/2” hose, which it can be set up for, I have had problems with it creating back pressure, and not clearing chips as well. The impeller creates a lot of air movement and without a 4” hose, and good DC set up I have seen this happen. This can also caused premature wear on the impeller housing. This is another cause for loose chips. ALL of my 735’s eventually wear at the back of the housing, and start spitting chips into the case. It is cheap and easy to replace both halves of the housing, but maybe part of the problem?

-- Who is John Galt?

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Matt Przybylski

528 posts in 1842 days


#11 posted 05-05-2014 06:10 PM

Joey, I have a 4” hose connected to the DW735 using Rockler’s Dust Right connection system.

How long does it usually take you to wear out the impeller housing? I’m just a hobbyist and I’ve probably not planed as much as a regular user, but how can I check for that?

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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woodchuckerNJ

1154 posts in 1098 days


#12 posted 05-05-2014 06:15 PM

Minor tearout?

-- Jeff NJ

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joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1537 days


#13 posted 05-05-2014 08:26 PM

Matt If you open the case it should be fairly clean. It is sealed from the cutting area on that model. If there is any chips in it, it has likely failed. It cannot be seen without removing at least one half. It always fails at the back. One half comes off quite easy, with two screws that you can looses with the factory wrench and then three spring clips around the back. It then pulls off. If you don’t see the groove run all the way around the housing it has failed. It depends on what you plane as well as how much. I usually change a housing per year, but use the planer probably 4 days a week, and in a heavy duty setting. It would be hard for me to translate that to home use. However, in a pinch I hooked one to a shop vac, the back pressure killed that housing in one afternoon :(

Anyhow, even with this consideration, you still won’t get every little chip on every run and some woods, especially alder, are prone to ‘chip bruising’, for lack of a better term, so sand away.

-- Who is John Galt?

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Matt Przybylski

528 posts in 1842 days


#14 posted 05-06-2014 02:45 AM

I think I found the culprit of the issues I was having. I raised the rollers as far as they go and inspected them and it does seem like there are chips getting stuck to them in between boards. These chips are probably then digging into the stock and causing what I outlined. I’ll have to keep a closer eye on the rollers from now on and clean them off more diligently. Thanks for everyone’s help.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

View Wolfdaddy's profile

Wolfdaddy

300 posts in 1299 days


#15 posted 05-06-2014 03:28 AM

I’ve seen this sort of thing quite a bit, and in my experience it actually seems to be caused by chips smacking the board with enough force to dent it. I have had this happen in the moulder I run on a part of the profile that is not touched by the feed rollers. Sometimes it is reduced by increasing the feed speed, but I don’t know if that is an option with your machine.

-- "MOM! I think there's something under our house! I'm gonna need a jackhammer, a fish bowl, some air tanks, and maybe a few pipes."

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