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Getting boards flat without a planner

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Forum topic by Aubster posted 07-02-2007 04:34 AM 3149 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Aubster

132 posts in 4108 days


07-02-2007 04:34 AM

Hi all,

I was just in my shop trying to get a bow out of a peice of reclaimed wood with my jointer, and I was wondering how do I get the top part of the bow out without a planner? I tried doing it with the jointer but the board comes out uneven.

-- A man who moves mountains starts one stone at a time.


11 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13754 posts in 4177 days


#1 posted 07-02-2007 05:14 AM

You could do it with handplanes. In general you need a jointer and a planer to get boards flat, square and paralell. I’ve seen jigs for planers that allow you to flatten a board but not the other way around.

Hey Karson, you have any ideas?

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View woodspar's profile

woodspar

710 posts in 4179 days


#2 posted 07-04-2007 02:48 AM

As Wayne says, you really need both. I have neither, so I am concentrating on the hand tools at this point. The planer rollers just push the board down and scrape the top – you need to use the jointer first to get a flat side. The planer makes the sides parallel, so if you have a flat side, it will make the other side parallel to the flat side which is what you want.

-- John

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 4077 days


#3 posted 07-04-2007 06:15 AM

If the bottom is truly flat from the jointer (as it should be), you could use that first flat face as a reference. From that face you could use a marking gauge set at the thickness you’d like the board to be and scribe a line all the way around the board. Use a hand plane (a jointer plane or a jack plane – or any dang bench plane that you have) to bring everything down to that line, working more on the high spots.

There can be a bit more to this, including the use of winding sticks and what have you, but this is a general way to do it without a planer. Also, if what you describe really is bow, you’d have to work more in the center of the board at first to take down the high spot in the middle.

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

13754 posts in 4177 days


#4 posted 07-04-2007 06:18 AM

Also, I would think about rough cutting the board before flattening if I did not need the full length of the board. This will reduce the amount of the bow and you will not need to remove as much material.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Karson's profile

Karson

35128 posts in 4480 days


#5 posted 07-04-2007 06:28 AM

I agree with Wayne. Cut the board up into the pieces size that you need giving you some ectra on length and width. So that it can be trued up after flattening.

The amount of bow and twist and cup is usually made smaller with smaller pieces.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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Aubster

132 posts in 4108 days


#6 posted 07-04-2007 09:04 PM

Thanks guys for the input. I just hoped there was a way to flatten a board just with a jointer. I knew that a Planer should have been my next tool buy, but I found a perfectly working jointer in the paper for $150 and could not pass it up. Well, I already got the hand plane sharpened and I guess it time to start my workout.

Talk to you later,

Aubrey

-- A man who moves mountains starts one stone at a time.

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 4077 days


#7 posted 07-05-2007 12:19 AM

best of luck – have fun with it! Until you get a planer…

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6860 posts in 4059 days


#8 posted 07-05-2007 12:53 AM

Hi Aubster;

Here’s a method you can try. It requires a couple pieces of wood that are flat, and about the same thickness as the board you want to plane. They must be somewhat longer also. They will serve s runners.

Lay the board you want to plane on a flat surface. Screw those two pieces to the edges of your workpiece, taking care not to move the position of the workpiece. Also, make sure your two boards are flat on the work surface. Now you can mount a router to piece of plywood, and slide it over the two runners. I would do it with the highest part of the bow up, and the edges of the workpiece facing down. (So the center has some space under it). After completing the first side, repeat on the opposite side.

I hope I explained this clearly. As you can see in my picture, I was thinking about it.

Good luck,
Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Aubster's profile

Aubster

132 posts in 4108 days


#9 posted 07-05-2007 06:58 AM

Thanks Lee,

That sounds like a good idea, and I will try it tomorrow. Your explaination was good. I undrestood it perfectly. I will let you know how it worked.

Aubrey

-- A man who moves mountains starts one stone at a time.

View Karson's profile

Karson

35128 posts in 4480 days


#10 posted 07-05-2007 07:01 AM

Mark Decou wrote a blog about flattening wide boards. I did something like Mark to flatten my Bowling Alley Work bench surface. 30” X 96”

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View Aubster's profile

Aubster

132 posts in 4108 days


#11 posted 07-05-2007 07:09 AM

Oh, I almost forgot.

Dorje, I did use your scribe idea today and it worked good. But hand planning in a 90+ degree shop was getting the boards a little wetter than I wanted. Thanks for the help

Aubrey

-- A man who moves mountains starts one stone at a time.

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