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Forum topic by Tokolosi posted 84 days ago 655 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tokolosi

653 posts in 956 days


84 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

I found this pallet the other day. Its two distinct hardwoods. One reminds me of mahogany but its too heavy and dense and the lighter one I think is cherry. I was hoping some of you knowlegable LJ’s may be able to I’d them. Thanks!

-- “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” ~ JRR Tolkien


13 replies so far

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

186 posts in 122 days


#1 posted 84 days ago

I would guess walnut. 35 years ago a guy who operated a pallet company sold me 1000 bf of walnut for $200 because he didn’t have the heart to make pallets out of it. Often it’s more cumbersome for a pallet operation to just use the prized lumber rather than to try and pick it out.

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1048 posts in 1726 days


#2 posted 84 days ago

I know this gets asked for alot, but cut and clean some end grain for us to see.
Face grain, figure, and color can be deceptive, but often the growth rings tell a better story.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

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Tokolosi

653 posts in 956 days


#3 posted 84 days ago

Thanks for the replies gents.

@ Yonak: I suppose it could be walnut but it doesnt have that distinctive walnut smell when you cut it. It smells like Bubinga when you cut it. And its very red. At this point I want to lean towards it being in the Bubinga family

@EPJartisan: here you go. I should have thought about this myself.

-- “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” ~ JRR Tolkien

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EPJartisan

1048 posts in 1726 days


#4 posted 83 days ago

WOW.. that throws me completely… it is obviously not a tropical tree with those distinct growth rings…BUT it seems to have interlocking grain. I have to only guess at Claro Walnut, California Black Walnut.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

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Tokolosi

653 posts in 956 days


#5 posted 83 days ago

I’m pretty certain its not Black Walnut. I use that a l lot and its harder and denser and smells different. Now the Claro Walnut looks promising. The images I have found online does resemble this wood a lot. And considering I found it in the US where it most likely was manufactured then a indigenous wood is probably the likely choice. Lets just say I don’t see many Bubinga trees in my neck of the wood.

Admittedly I do not know much about trees. Would you please explain your growth ring comment? Every opportunity to learn something new…

-- “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” ~ JRR Tolkien

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1321 posts in 368 days


#6 posted 83 days ago

If it is walnut, it smells like walnut.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View RossC23's profile

RossC23

15 posts in 318 days


#7 posted 83 days ago

Looks like Jatoba to me. Especially the end grain. Color, density, weight all match up.

View Tokolosi's profile

Tokolosi

653 posts in 956 days


#8 posted 83 days ago

@ mrjinx007: I have used black walnut a lot and love that unique, chocolaty smell but I’ve not used Claro Walnut. Does it have the same distinctive smell?

@ RossC23: Jatoba! It looks the same from pictures I see on the net.

-- “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” ~ JRR Tolkien

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1321 posts in 368 days


#9 posted 83 days ago

Tokolosi, Yes, they smell pretty much the same. Even Persian walnut or English walnut which are a lot more dense than American walnuts smell like “walnut”.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Yonak's profile

Yonak

186 posts in 122 days


#10 posted 83 days ago

It seems to me if you can tell what was on the pallet originally you can tell where the pallet was made. They’re not going to import wood to make a pallet.

View richardwootton's profile

richardwootton

1087 posts in 556 days


#11 posted 83 days ago

Does the wood have an oily feel to it?

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1048 posts in 1726 days


#12 posted 83 days ago

Tokolosi, though admittedly there are far more knowledgable people on here …this is a very general description.

Growth rings mark the seasonal growth of trees. Trees that live in areas with cold / warm seasons develop early wood, often very porous so as the leaves grow the tree can pull up a lot of nutrients and water for the roots, but then late in the autumn before the tree hibernates for winter, the tree grows denser… the combo creates distinct lines that can be counted and examined by the year. Most tropical trees live in areas of wet and dry instead of cold/warm. Often tropical trees change the direction of the cells and grain to accommodate absorption or retention of nutrients and water, so the growth rings are less able to be noticed.

From end grain, you can see if it has rings, open cells, tylosis (inclusions of chemicals and stuff) or parenchyma cells (rays in Quartersawn White oak)... etc. things that can not be known by looking at the face grain.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

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Tokolosi

653 posts in 956 days


#13 posted 83 days ago

The wood is dry and does not seem oily. But it could be from exposure. Unfortunately I can’t track where it came from. No marks or labels. And found in a community trash enclosure.

And thanks for that EPJ. Very informative.

-- “There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” ~ JRR Tolkien

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