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segmented bowl question.

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Forum topic by Mark posted 05-02-2014 05:13 PM 477 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark

454 posts in 663 days


05-02-2014 05:13 PM

Morning all. I have a bunch of strips leftover from “ripping” 4/4 Cherry boards. About 1” square and about 16” long. I was thinking of cutting these to about 1-3/4 L by 1” sq. Cutting the appropriate angle on them. Doing a glue up and creating a segmented bowl blank. The only issue I can see is I’d be cutting end grain all the time. Can you see a problem with this? Thanks in advance.

-- Mark


5 replies so far

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4137 posts in 1068 days


#1 posted 05-02-2014 05:50 PM

You could although I’d hate cutting all that end grain, tear out would be a nightmare. I would orient them the other way so you will not be cutting end grain. That leaves you with only 1” thickness so the bowl slope will be slight but much easier to turn and a nicer finish.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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TheDane

3862 posts in 2351 days


#2 posted 05-02-2014 05:53 PM

Mark—End grain in segmented bowls would be tough to get a decent finish cut on.

Maybe I am not understanding, but it seems as though you would actually be turning side/long grain. I am assuming the 16” length is with the grain and you would be cutting those into 1 3/4” long pieces which would be glued end-grain to end-grain. Correct?

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Mark's profile

Mark

454 posts in 663 days


#3 posted 05-02-2014 05:57 PM

Thanks for the input Rick. I kinda figured that. Gerry, I’d be gluing edge grain to edge grain with the end grain…on each end. I kinda thought it might be nasty, but I had to ask the question.

-- Mark

View harveysoriginals's profile

harveysoriginals

101 posts in 175 days


#4 posted 05-02-2014 06:15 PM

It would be much easier, IMHO, to do this if you are using carbide tools!

-- The most dangerous tool in my shop is the one I am currently using! Harvey

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TheDane

3862 posts in 2351 days


#5 posted 05-02-2014 08:27 PM

harveysoriginals—Each to his own, but IMHO carbide tools would make just as much or more of a mess in end-grain than sharp HSS tools. Despite using the nomenclature ‘cutters’, the carbide inserts used on most woodturning tools are actually scrapers and they tear the grain instead of slicing it.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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