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Forum topic by 93mwm posted 01-16-2009 05:59 AM 772 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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93mwm

59 posts in 2109 days


01-16-2009 05:59 AM

Topic tags/keywords: boat question lumber materials help

Hey everyone! Thanks in advance for responding to this with helpful posts ;)!
I am currently in the thought procces of a boat build and i was just wondering if anyone has any helpful design/material hints! thanks

-- mwm! Before you criticise walk a mile in their shoes, and when you do criticise you will be a mile away and have their shoes!


11 replies so far

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2583 days


#1 posted 01-16-2009 02:09 PM

its a lot easier just to cash your paycheque, stand outside and wait for a really strong wind and throw the cash into the air.

I’ve built one kayak, one canoe, and re-built a 1956 14’ mahogany Chriscraft inboard runabout

and I stick with my first sentence

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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Moron

4666 posts in 2583 days


#2 posted 01-16-2009 02:30 PM

Hi Dave

Hmmmm, I would have to say that it is way less expensive to buy one then build one albeit the self satisfaction isnt the same.

The stand is the first tip. It has to be straight, level, and plumb and it it has to STAY straight level and plumb as to miss this step could reveal a canoe thats really good at moving in circles.

Canoe # 1…..........redwood with ash accents, to the tune of 2 grand in materials, one wife and a 200,000 divorce. I actually took a chain saw and cut the canoe in half, gave her the front half and I kept the back and mine made a great looking bookcase. Her lawyer quit asking for more money after she recieved her “gift”.

Kayak number 1….........cedar, compass, inlays etc…...........2 grand, another wife and 250,000 divorce.

Chriscraft….........after 10 grand I quit counting. When it was done a very large crowd gathered at the boat launch which was really cool for the ego. Sounded like a Harley in the water and I was somewhat overjoyed until the carberator and fuel pump puked…............after having a new fuel pump and carb re-build….....I sold it. I was single at the time and am now on #3 with no plans on building another…..yet. Maybe a schooner or a tall ship next?

Its kinda odd, but I remember each and every mistake that I made on each boat/canoe/kayak.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View dan_fash's profile

dan_fash

47 posts in 2115 days


#3 posted 01-16-2009 02:38 PM

boat——big hole in the water you throw money into.

Never built a boat, find it intriguing, will follow this post, see how I feel after the LJ’s have at it

-- "If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most logical explantion is that I was made for another world." -C.S. Lewis

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2583 days


#4 posted 01-16-2009 02:48 PM

nothing has the possibility of being more rewarding then the maiden launch of a hand crafted water vessel…...........and there is always the possibiilty of severe dissappointment!

Its bad Karma to use the words, he, him, boy, man. Always use she, her, girl.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View NY_Rocking_Chairs's profile

NY_Rocking_Chairs

500 posts in 2287 days


#5 posted 01-16-2009 03:23 PM

I am working on canoe #1. It is a cedar strip. There are several building techniques. The strip, lap, stitch and glue, etc. Depends on what you want to build, how many tools you have, etc.

There are companies that sell complete kits with the strips all cut and shaped, or kits for the stitch and glue. A normal s&g kayak kit will run about $800 and a strip kayak kit around $1200.

With canoe #1 I bought some left-over cedar decking from my wood supplier and the router bits to shape the strips. So far I am into (with fiberglass and form costs) about $700. For schedule reasons I am going on 20 months though.

Then you need a way to transport said boat, trailer, roof rack, put wings and an engine on it, etc.

Good luck.

-- Rich, WNY, www.nyrockingchairs.com

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1489 posts in 2451 days


#6 posted 01-16-2009 03:41 PM

I have always wanted to build a cedar strip canoe. Upon closer observation and study, I decided to purchase one instead. Even a smallish 15 foot canoe would dominate a lot of space in the shop for a long time. And then there is the messy fiberglass application with highly toxic and flamable chemicals.

Best to you if you proceed, be sure to work in an area that can be adequately ventilated.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View 93mwm's profile

93mwm

59 posts in 2109 days


#7 posted 01-18-2009 01:34 PM

Hey guys thanks for the replies. I was thinking of a traditional old school row boat probably 2 maybe four seater. As for the building technique not really sure probably go with lap ( it doesnt have to be too sturdy(just for lake in my backyard)) what im having trouble with is the wood. Is cedar a good choice? Where i am i have acces to lots of very dense heavy timber but im not sure about the floatability. Ive got all the standard equipment tblesaw, bandswa, jointer/planer, all hand tools, i dont have a spokeshave but thats about it i was just wondering if i need any special equipment.
cheers

-- mwm! Before you criticise walk a mile in their shoes, and when you do criticise you will be a mile away and have their shoes!

View dan_fash's profile

dan_fash

47 posts in 2115 days


#8 posted 01-18-2009 02:23 PM

Sir Bedevere: There are ways of telling whether she is a witch.
Peasant 1: Are there? Oh well, tell us.
Sir Bedevere: Tell me. What do you do with witches?
Peasant 1: Burn them.
Sir Bedevere: And what do you burn, apart from witches?
Peasant 1: More witches.
Peasant 2: Wood.
Sir Bedevere: Good. Now, why do witches burn?
Peasant 3: ...because they’re made of… wood?
Sir Bedevere: Good. So how do you tell whether she is made of wood?
Peasant 1: Build a bridge out of her.
Sir Bedevere: But can you not also build bridges out of stone?
Peasant 1: Oh yeah.
Sir Bedevere: Does wood sink in water?
Peasant 1: No, no, it floats!... It floats! Throw her into the pond!
Sir Bedevere: No, no. What else floats in water?
Peasant 1: Bread.
Peasant 2: Apples.
Peasant 3: Very small rocks.
Peasant 1: Cider.
Peasant 2: Gravy.
Peasant 3: Cherries.
Peasant 1: Mud.
Peasant 2: Churches.
Peasant 3: Lead! Lead!
King Arthur: A Duck.
Sir Bedevere: ...Exactly. So, logically…
Peasant 1: If she weighed the same as a duck… she’s made of wood.
Sir Bedevere: And therefore…
Peasant 2: ...A witch!

-- "If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most logical explantion is that I was made for another world." -C.S. Lewis

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2583 days


#9 posted 01-18-2009 02:30 PM

cedar and redwood are both good choices and also, marine grade plywood. All three are light. The solid woods need either canvas, or epoxy resin coated firbreglass, otherwise they need a long soak and re-inforced hull strips.

I really hate seeing yet another redwood come down…............thats just me.

Good Luck

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1281 posts in 2426 days


#10 posted 01-18-2009 06:41 PM

93mwm,

You might look at Pygmy boats. They make wooden boat kits. They have one model of a lapstrake rowing skiff
that is very good and easy to make. They will ship the kits pretty much anywhere. I have visited their place in Washington state and they make an excellent product.

http://www.pygmyboats.com/

John

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View 93mwm's profile

93mwm

59 posts in 2109 days


#11 posted 01-19-2009 04:56 AM

Thanks for the advice John + Roman (im not gonna use redwood ;))

-- mwm! Before you criticise walk a mile in their shoes, and when you do criticise you will be a mile away and have their shoes!

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