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CNC router under construction

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Forum topic by MrRon posted 04-28-2014 08:21 PM 1026 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


04-28-2014 08:21 PM

I have had a CNC router under construction for over two years. other projects have put it on a back burner, but mainly cost has been the biggest obstacle to completion. Its pretty much complete, except for the electronics. I hope to be able to work aluminum as well as wood in support of my large scale locomotive construction.


8 replies so far

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Underdog

902 posts in 1499 days


#1 posted 04-28-2014 08:25 PM

What?!!! No pix of the build?

Wanna see!

Locomotives sound fun too.

-- "woodworker with an asterisk"

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#2 posted 04-29-2014 04:36 PM

Progress so far. Actually I’m a bit further along.

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Underdog

902 posts in 1499 days


#3 posted 04-29-2014 04:37 PM

Oh, WHEW! I was needing the fix…

Nice looking build so far. Love to see more as it progresses. You guys that build your own are inspiring!

-- "woodworker with an asterisk"

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#4 posted 04-29-2014 05:02 PM

The size is 42”x84” and constructed from MDO and MDF. I borrowed ideas from other machines. This whole CNC thing has a learning curve and I am ascending somewhere on that curve. My final objective is to be able to cut aluminum, but I think the size of my machine will not be rigid enough. I will continue developing this machine with machining wood only in mind. I won’t need anything as large for metal, so I will either design a smaller one (small = more rigid), or add CNC to my vertical mill. I have been reading on some CNC forums that any machine can work aluminum, but you are limited to extremely shallow (.003”) cuts and many multiple passes. That has led me to realize my machine would not be suitable for aluminum as it is now. But this is a learning curve. My problem really is; a lack of money. I know there are a lot of components out there that can be assembled into a rigid machine, but cost is high. I’m trying to do this on a shoestring. So far, I have about $300 invested. My goal is to keep it under $1000. 3-D printing is now getting my attention; there are parts that could be made with 3-D technology that would fit right in with my large scale train interest. I will be 80 in a few months, so I hope I don’t run out of time before I can get this machine up and running.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#5 posted 04-29-2014 05:07 PM

The base is made from MDF, the parts shown as white are MDO. The top is a torsion box. Everything runs on Vee groove rollers riding aluminum angle track. The drive is chains and sprockets. I probably spent $150 just for the hardware alone (screws, nut, bolts, etc.)

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1184 days


#6 posted 04-29-2014 05:16 PM

I would think you’d have pretty good rigidity from a torsion box top. In fact I was going to recommend just that if you hadn’t mentioned it in the last post.

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#7 posted 04-30-2014 03:47 PM

The torsion box gives a flat surface which a CNC router must have. It’s the gantry that has to be rigid in order to work with aluminum. The slightest amount of unwanted movement anywhere in the moving parts inventory will be magnified at the router spindle.

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Mainiac Matt

5992 posts in 1792 days


#8 posted 04-30-2014 04:39 PM

Looks like a fun project…. good luck finishing it up.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

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