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Scoop at the end of a cut

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Forum topic by PLLryc posted 04-26-2014 12:22 AM 1166 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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PLLryc

2 posts in 958 days


04-26-2014 12:22 AM

I’m new to this forum and would like to ask those who know more than me a question. I just bought a yardsale benchtop planer. I’ve never used one before. I noticed a nick in one blade so I got them sharped. Got them set up with no problem. My question is this. There is always a scoop at the end of a cut. Is there anything I can do to fix this? Or is it just a cheap planer? As soon as the board comes of the inboard table it drops and makes the scoop. Anything you can tell me would help.


15 replies so far

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

2526 posts in 1742 days


#1 posted 04-26-2014 12:33 AM

That scoop is called snipe. Pretty typical with planers. There is many sources on the web discussing ways to minimize snipe, some effective, some not. As an example of what’s out there, I did a search and copied and pasted the first thing I came across.

http://newwoodworker.com/plnrsuprt.html

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1538 days


#2 posted 04-26-2014 01:05 AM

If you would like to know how to minimize “snipe” (+1 op +1) let us know the brand of your planer. there are many ways to approach the basics in the linked article, according to brand.

-- Who is John Galt?

View Ted's profile

Ted

2785 posts in 1677 days


#3 posted 04-26-2014 02:02 AM

Try sending short piece of scrap of the same thickness right behind the one you’re planing so the scrap piece can take the snipe. Just but the scrap piece to the end of the good wood as the end enters the planer.

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

1094 posts in 1169 days


#4 posted 04-26-2014 02:06 AM

I’ve had good success with making light cuts. The other thing to do is cut the board long and cut the snipe off when done planing. But with light cuts, I get very little snipe if any.

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

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Ted

2785 posts in 1677 days


#5 posted 04-26-2014 03:56 AM

Agreed, leaving the board a bit long is the best option. My suggestion of chasing it with a scrap was assuming no room for waste. I don’t see “less” snipe as a solution, because it is still there. If snipe makes the board 1/64” thinner, it is still thinner.

-- The first cordless tool was a stick. The first power tool was a rock.

View runswithscissors's profile (online now)

runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1491 days


#6 posted 04-26-2014 07:08 AM

Perhaps we could make snipe a desirable feature in our work, rather than something to avoid.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22033 posts in 1804 days


#7 posted 04-26-2014 08:37 AM

Lift slightly on the board as it reaches the end of the board. Snipe is often caused by the board dropping as it comes through, the heavy end drops and pushes the end in the planer up into the blades.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2413 posts in 2387 days


#8 posted 04-26-2014 01:54 PM

As Monte Pittman said :Lift the end of the board slightly as it enters and leaves the planer. This will convince you that this will correct the problem. Then adjust the infeed and outfeed tables to do this lifting automaticly every time and away goes the snipe. I did this on my DeWalt planer and it works very well.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1116 posts in 2591 days


#9 posted 04-26-2014 02:04 PM

yep… ditto. i’ve got a DeWalt and must lift upon entry and exit. also the thinner or more figured the grain the greater the chance if it being pulled up into the blades. sometimes i have to really bend a board to eliminate snipe.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

1094 posts in 1169 days


#10 posted 04-26-2014 02:09 PM

Watch your fingers if you lift the end of a short board!

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View Andy Ponder's profile

Andy Ponder

232 posts in 1173 days


#11 posted 04-27-2014 03:09 AM

I have the older Dewalt planer. The in feed and out feed tables are kind of a pain to adjust, but I get zero snipe even on short pieces now.

Andy

-- AP--I thought growing old would take longer.

View NiteWalker's profile

NiteWalker

2735 posts in 2042 days


#12 posted 04-27-2014 03:38 AM

What Andy said. I adjusted my dewalt planer tables so the ends are a bit higher than the bed and I get zero snipe.

-- He who dies with the most tools... dies with the emptiest wallet.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13504 posts in 1322 days


#13 posted 04-27-2014 03:44 AM

Lots of good advice here. I do a combination of these things. I do lift up and it helps a lot as the piece exits. If your planer has the cutter head lock you can use that. What I’ll do instead of locking it every time is just do it on the last pass or two. The best way to deal with it is make it long and cut it later, but that’s not always possible.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View PLLryc's profile

PLLryc

2 posts in 958 days


#14 posted 05-03-2014 01:36 AM

Thanks all for the good advice

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8257 posts in 2894 days


#15 posted 05-03-2014 02:45 AM

I bought a laminated MDF shelf and cut it to 4’ long. It becomes an auxiliary bed. No more snipe.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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