LumberJocks

How much to sell these for?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Sweating for Bucks Through Woodworking forum

Forum topic by DarthMaverick posted 04-25-2014 12:54 AM 1519 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View DarthMaverick's profile

DarthMaverick

22 posts in 236 days


04-25-2014 12:54 AM

Topic tags/keywords: skull patio bench sale finished question pallet pirate money pine

So here is a question for all you LJ’s. I just completed a new set of patio furniture for my wife. Living on a busy corner, I have had a lot of people stop by to ask me to make them a set. My question is, how much should I sell these for? I made my set out of cheap pallet wood. I would make these out of better pine boards for sale purposes. I just have no idea where to price them, I want to be fair in my price but make enough to make it worth the extra work, this is by no means a full time, part time, or any time job for me. I build things because I enjoy to, if I can make a buck here and there to add to my habit, then that would be great. Below are some pictures of what people want me to make. Any help on any of the items would be great. Should I sell them finished or unfinished and what should the price gap be between if it is finished or not? Should I charge different for costume designs?

Any help would be great!!!

Skull Bench

Skull Chair

Pirate Stool / Side Table


30 replies so far

View robdem's profile

robdem

325 posts in 1258 days


#1 posted 04-25-2014 01:09 AM

Can’t help with pricing but those are some cool looking projects .

View DarthMaverick's profile

DarthMaverick

22 posts in 236 days


#2 posted 04-25-2014 01:13 AM

Well thank you Rob, I am happy with the way they turned out.

View mnguy's profile

mnguy

161 posts in 2050 days


#3 posted 04-25-2014 01:15 AM

Look at what nice cedar or pine Adirondack chairs are going for in your area, and, assuming you will be offering similar functional quality and materials, I’d start at 3 times that price; if you make at least 2x your material cost at that price, you are doing ok. NEVER charge less than 2x your materials (personal philosophy).

Don’t use pricing on bare bones chairs at a big box store as your basis, either.

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1427 posts in 420 days


#4 posted 04-25-2014 01:39 AM

What those symbols represent?

-- earthartandfoods.com

View DarthMaverick's profile

DarthMaverick

22 posts in 236 days


#5 posted 04-25-2014 01:46 AM

mnguy, that sounds like a good personal philosophy to live by.

mrjinx007, it is the symbol for the east india company. My wife has a pirate theme for the back yard, pirates would often take east india company ships for their own being that they were normally filled with valuable loot ripe for the taking. So it would be common to find the logo for the east india company on pirate cargo.

View Puzzleman's profile

Puzzleman

331 posts in 1596 days


#6 posted 04-25-2014 01:57 AM

How long did it take you to make them? How much would lumber cost? How much would the paint cost? How much do the screws, nails or fasteners cost?

Once you answer those questions, you can start to determine a price. I would add 10% to the cost of wood and supplies. How much do you want to make per hour? If $10, then multiply that by the number of hours it took you. Add that number to the previous number and that would be your minimum price.

Don’t be scared if your price comes out higher than what you initially thought. Remember that you are making a very unique product that the customer cannot get anywhere else. Remember that you are worth every penny.

Jim

-- Jim Beachler, Chief Puzzler, http://www.hollowwoodworks.com

View DarthMaverick's profile

DarthMaverick

22 posts in 236 days


#7 posted 04-25-2014 02:01 AM

Awesome advice Jim! Thank you for your insight.

View mantwi's profile

mantwi

312 posts in 548 days


#8 posted 04-25-2014 02:21 AM

Where do you live, 0001 Cemetery Lane cause it looks like the Addam’s families lawn furniture. Or maybe you live at 1313 Mockingbird Lane in Herman and Lilly Munsters old place.

View DarthMaverick's profile

DarthMaverick

22 posts in 236 days


#9 posted 04-25-2014 02:37 AM

mantwi, Mockingbird Lane sounds appropriate.

View UpstateNYdude's profile

UpstateNYdude

443 posts in 635 days


#10 posted 04-25-2014 02:57 AM

+1 for at minimum double the materials cost.

-- Nick, “Discovering the truth about ourselves is a lifetime's work, but it's worth the effort.” ― Fred Rogers, Be My Neighbor

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1967 posts in 2117 days


#11 posted 04-25-2014 03:18 AM

2 times materials, ALL, materials is a good starting point.
I find work for family and friends tends to be FREE. If you charge what you are worth, they are mad or disappointed. If you charge what they think you are worth, you are bitter or disappointed. Free works great for family and friends. Off the street clients start at two times materials and goes up from there.
Good luck

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View Loren's profile

Loren

7548 posts in 2300 days


#12 posted 04-25-2014 03:25 AM

People go away when they get a price.

Most folks don’t even know what lumber costs.

Start throwing out numbers from 2x to 6x and watch the faces.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View DarthMaverick's profile

DarthMaverick

22 posts in 236 days


#13 posted 04-25-2014 12:51 PM

Loren, I was afraid of that, but then again, I am really not trying to make a living here. I have a few people expressing interest, that are not friends (I will have to agree with BTKS on that one). If I have any takers I can use that money to add to my habit, if not oh well. I do wan’t to be fair though to both the costumer and myself.

View Marcus's profile

Marcus

1046 posts in 672 days


#14 posted 04-25-2014 12:52 PM

Not a big fan of 2x,3x whateverX material cost. Actually figure out what it costs you to make these. There was a good thread recently on this with a link to the blog post detailing how one person prices out their work. Basically take your materials expense, labor expense, shop expense and add a bit of profit in for yourself. You’ll come up with a true number for what it costs to make the chair and then you can nudge the number up or down a bit depending on the area you’re in if the price looks way off for the area. Just remember that you’re cheating yourself if you lower it from your actual cost to produce.

View DarthMaverick's profile

DarthMaverick

22 posts in 236 days


#15 posted 04-25-2014 01:09 PM

Thank you Marcus, I will need to try to find that thread. It is a great way to look at the overall question instead of 2×3x etc.

What does everyone charge for their time? Remember this is not my full time job, just a hobby I love.

showing 1 through 15 of 30 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase